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Apologies if this has already been posted. This priest has intestinal fortitude; sadly he is not informed, it seems, of the full state of crisis, as he has faith in the "Great Pope St John Paul the Second". Be that as it may, I was delighted to hear his message to the current incumbent on the papal throne.


https://remnantnewspaper.com/web/index.php/fetzen-fliegen/item/3565-catholic-priest-to-be-excommunicated-if-he-doesn-t-pledge-fidelity-to-francis-agenda
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Politics and World Leaders / Re: Trouble in Paradise
« Last post by poche on Today at 02:08:26 AM »
As a young priest, the Rev. Fidelis Mukonori collected evidence of atrocities during Zimbabwe's brutal civil war. The reports filtered to Robert Mugabe, then a leading figure in the liberation struggles.
Decades later, Mukonori helped persuade Mugabe to relinquish power.
In his first interview since Zimbabwe's apparent coup and peaceful transfer of power, Mukonori described hours of debate and discussion at the presidential residence, State House, and Mugabe's personal residence.
Mukonori met daily with Mugabe, who is 93 years old and had been the nation's leader for almost four decades.
The Rev. Fidelis Mukonori
He became lead negotiator because both Mugabe and the military trusted him. The 70-year-old Jesuit priest from Zimbabwe said he's mediated between bitter political rivals in the past.

http://www.cnn.com/2017/11/24/africa/mugabe-resignation-mediated-by-priest/index.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+rss%2Fcnn_topstories+%28RSS%3A+CNN+-+Top+Stories%29
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The Catholic Bunker / Re: The oldest person?
« Last post by poche on Today at 01:35:42 AM »
At age 113, Sister André is one of the oldest religious sisters in the world.
 According to French newspaper Le Parisien, Sister André is the oldest person in France. She told the newspaper that this “very much surprised me because I never even thought about it.”
 Sister André, who is blind, currently resides in the Sainte-Catherine-Labouré retirement home for religious in Toulon, a city in southeast France near the Mediterranean.
 She was born Lucille Randon on Feb. 11, 1904 in the town of Alès , about 140 miles northwest of Toulon. The nun told the French daily La Croix that she grew up in a poor Protestant family. Her paternal grandfather was “a pastor, very strict. The services lasted forever and you had to follow the entire sermon without budging or falling asleep! So my parents no longer practiced their religion. But that troubled me.”
 When she was 27, she converted to Catholicism. “I gradually progressed, following my Catholic faith,” she said.
 During her youth, she worked as a teacher and governess for various families including the Peugeots, who founded and owned the French car manufacturer.
 At age 40, she joined the Daughters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul and took the name André in honor of her brother André, whom she said was like a parent to her.
 After World War II began, the nun started working in a hospital in the town of Vichy in central France, taking care of the elderly and children.
 “Some of them were orphans, some placed there by their parents because they were no longer able to feed them,” she recalled.
 Sister André cared for children in that hospital for nearly 30 years, and said that “some of them have looked me up and still come to see me.”
 In 2009, the nun moved into the Sainte-Catherine-Labouré retirement home in Toulon.
 “I am really fortunate to be here, because I'm very well cared for here,” she said. “That's very reassuring at my age.”
 “When my brothers died when I was 70, I thought that it would be my turn soon,” she said. But several decades later, she is still alive, and grateful for all the blessings God has continued to send her.
 Sister André told La Croix that she worked until she was 104 years old. What she misses now is that she can no longer “read, write, draw, embroider and knit.” However, she said that she still enjoys experiencing the nice weather.
 “The good Lord has guided me well,” she reflected.
 
 
 https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/...ings-14217
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Crisis in the Church / Re: St Pius X and the holy synod of russia
« Last post by poche on Today at 01:32:07 AM »
The implications of this are twofold.

1st is that the rules for communicatio in sacris really predate Vatican II

2nd is that Pope Pius X was a pope of ecumenical dialog. 
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 What glory does St. Michael receive from his feast day on earth?
When the feast of a saint is celebrated on earth, he receives an increase of accidental glory in Heaven, even if he is not actually remembered on earth. He receives a special recompense in memory of some particular act of heroic virtue, or of some increase of glory, which he procured for God at a given time. This reward consists in an increase of accidental glory joined to the happiness which the memory of his work on earth causes him. The accidental glory which the Archangel receives is far above that of the other saints, because this glory is proportioned to the greatness of the merit of the recipient and also to the value of the action which merits the reward.

http://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/view.cfm?id=6253
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Crisis in the Church / Re: St Pius X and the holy synod of russia
« Last post by Maria Regina on Today at 01:25:27 AM »
This is not surprising. Pius X died in 1914, three years before the satanic atheistic Russian revolution.

Jesuits and Catholic theologians had been teaching in Russian Orthodox seminaries for many years, paving the way for a possible Orthodox-Catholic reunion.
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Health and Nutrition / Re: Friday or not, whats your dinner?
« Last post by poche on Today at 01:22:46 AM »
Today for dinner I had potatoes with onions, celery, peppers, collard greens, macaroni and cheese.
mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
:chef: :chef: :chef:
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Crisis in the Church / St Pius X and the holy synod of russia
« Last post by PG on Yesterday at 09:50:21 PM »


At minute 17 charles coulombe talks about how st pius x and the holy synod of russia during the russian japanese war struck a deal allowing intercommunion for the orthodox/catholic prisoners.  What were the implications of this?  Did it extend beyond prisoners?  And, I am not being terribly serious here, but maybe this is why our lady wanted a consecration of russia.  We were already inter communing with them.  
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Crisis in the Church / Re: ROTTEN FRUITS OF VATICAN II
« Last post by Marlelar on Yesterday at 09:23:32 PM »
I think the biggest problem with Vatican 2 is that it deconstructed the Catholic faith, hence you get men like Barron who do not have the slightest idea of what God requires of his children. 

He should be run out of town on a rail. 
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Genuinuely curious here - how do those who reject BOD understand the following from the Council of Trent and St Alphonsus in regards to the same?

ouncil of Trent 1545-1563
Canons on the Sacraments in General: - (Canon 4):
   "If anyone shall say that the sacraments of the New Law are not necessary for salvation, but are superfluous, and that although all are not necessary for every individual, without them or without the desire of them (sine eis aut eorum voto), through faith alone men obtain from God the grace of justification; let him be anathema."

Decree on Justification - (Session 6, Chapter 4):
   "In these words a description of the justification of a sinner is given as being a translation from that state in which man is born a child of the first Adam to the state of grace and of the 'adoption of the Sons' (Rom. 8:15) of God through the second Adam, Jesus Christ, our Savior and this translation after the promulgation of the Gospel cannot be effected except through the laver of regeneration or a desire for it, (sine lavacro regenerationis aut eius voto) as it is written: "Unless a man be born again of water and the Holy Spirit, he cannot enter in the kingdom of God" (John 3:5).

St. Alphonsus Liguori 1691-1787
Moral Theology - (Bk. 6):
   "But baptism of desire is perfect conversion to God by contrition or love of God above all things accompanied by an explicit or implicit desire for true Baptism of water, the place of which it takes as to the remission of guilt, but not as to the impression of the [baptismal] character or as to the removal of all debt of punishment. It is called 'of wind' ['flaminis'] because it takes place by the impulse of the Holy Ghost Who is called a wind ['flamen']. Now it is de fide that men are also saved by Baptism of desire, by virtue of the Canon 'Apostolicam De Presbytero Non Baptizato' and the Council of Trent, Session 6, Chapter 4, where it is said that no one can be saved 'without the laver of regeneration or the desire for it.'"
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