Author Topic: The Black Nazarene  (Read 635 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline poche

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13284
  • Reputation: +430/-843
  • Gender: Male
The Black Nazarene
« on: January 10, 2018, 02:16:25 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!2
  • A massive crowd of mostly barefoot Filipino Catholics joined a raucous procession of a centuries-old life-size statue of Jesus Christ under extra-tight security Tuesday after the Philippines came under a disastrous militant attack last year.
    Although the Philippine police and military said they have not monitored any specific threat, they deployed more than 6,000 personnel, including snipers and bomb squads backed by a surveillance helicopter and drones, to secure the annual procession of the wooden Black Nazarene along Manila's streets. By nightfall, nearly 1,000 devotees had been treated by Red Cross volunteers, mostly for minor injuries and ailments and exhaustion.
    Authorities imposed a gun ban, cellphone signals were jammed sporadically in the vicinity of the procession and a team of bomb experts walked sniffer dogs along the route ahead of the crowd. Concrete barriers blocked the route, partly to prevent the kind of attacks that have been witnessed in Europe, where Islamic radicals have rammed vehicles into crowds, a military official said.
    Hundreds of local and foreign militants laid siege for five months last year to southern Marawi city, leaving more than 1,100 combatants and civilians dead in the worst IS group-linked attack so far in Asia. Troops crushed the uprising in October, but an unspecified number of extremists managed to escape and other small but brutal groups in the country's south still pose threats.
    Security officials said they were also concerned with possible stampedes in a dawn-to-midnight event that national police chief Ronald dela Rosa said drew about 2.6 million devotees. It's unclear how the police came up with the crowd estimate given that people joined and left the procession constantly.
    Mobs of devotees in maroon shirts dangerously squeezed their way into the tight pack of humanity around a carriage carrying the Jesus statue. They threw small towels at volunteers on the carriage, which was being pulled by ropes, to wipe parts of the cross and the statue in the belief that the Nazarene's powers would cure ailments and foster good health and fortune.
    Ronald Malaguinio, a 38-year-old worker, carried a small replica of the Nazarene on a steel platform bedecked with yellow and white flowers for several kilometers (miles) from his home in Manila's Tondo slum district to join the procession and pray for a son recovering from a heart ailment.
    "If the doctor says your son has a 50-50 chance of surviving, where will you go?" Malaguinio asked. "If money can't cure diseases, the only other option is prayers. Ours have been heard and we're here to thank the Nazarene."
    Another devotee, Jeffrey Nolasco, said he joined the procession for the fifth year in a row to pray that his four children will finish school, his impoverished family could eat three times a day and he could overcome a bad habit.
    "I'm a drunkard," said Nolasco, who walked barefoot on the hot pavement and carried a small statue of the cross-carrying Nazarene.
    Jim Coffin, an anthropology professor from Muncie, Indiana, said he and his wife flew in as tourists and were "absolutely moved" by the massive but peaceful procession and display of religious faith by the devotees, many of them poor.
    "We watched them as they threw towels on the statue and rubbed it on their bodies," Coffin said as the procession inched its way nearby. "If the people in power appreciate how bad off the people are and they truly want to better their lives, the people in power have got to be moved by this."
    Crowned with thorns and bearing a cross, the Nazarene statue is believed to have been brought from Mexico to Manila on a galleon in 1606 by Spanish missionaries. The ship that carried it caught fire, but the charred statue survived. Some believe the statue's endurance, from fires and earthquakes through the centuries and intense bombings during World War II, is a testament to its powers.
    The spectacle reflects the unique brand of Catholicism, which includes folk superstitions, in Asia's largest Catholic nation. Dozens of Filipinos have themselves nailed to crosses on Good Friday in another tradition to emulate Christ's suffering that draws huge crowds each year.

    https://www.yahoo.com/news/huge-philippine-procession-secured-tightly-amid-terror-fears-044409064.html

    Offline poche

    • Hero Member
    • *****
    • Posts: 13284
    • Reputation: +430/-843
    • Gender: Male
    Re: The Black Nazarene
    « Reply #1 on: January 11, 2018, 01:38:35 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!1
  • After 22 hours since its procession began, the Black Nazarene statue was returned to its home, Quiapo Church at Plaza Miranda, at 3:00 a.m. on Wednesday, ending the grand Traslacion this year.
    As the image was pulled into the church, devotees raised their arms, chanting, “Viva Poong Hesus Nazareno!”
    Police had formed a barricade along the entrance of the basilica to ensure the quick passage of the Andas, or the platform carrying the statue.

    Escorted by millions of barefoot devotees, the revered image left Quirino Grandstand early Tuesday morning, at 5:07 a.m., making its way through Manila’s old streets toward the Minor Basilica of the Black Nazarene, more commonly known as Quiapo Church.
    At least 4.5 million devotees attended this year’s Traslacion – or about two million more than last year, according to police estimates.
    However, contrary to the earlier prediction of Director General Ronald dela Rosa, chief of the Philippine National Police, the barefoot procession, which started at 5:30 a.m., lasted just as long as last year – 22 hours.

    Held every year on Jan. 9, the Traslacion is widely considered as one of the biggest religious events in Asia as millions of barefoot devotees follow the Black Nazarene hoping to get a chance to kiss, touch, or rub cloth on the icon.
    In an interview with reporters at Quiapo Church on Tuesday afternoon, Dela Rosa said the “smoother” flow of this year’s procession was due to the changes introduced by police to ensure the safety of devotees.
    Among these is the signal interruption of cellular services within a 1-km radius of the procession routes, as well as some of Manila’s neighboring cities, which Dela Rosa said was done to reduce terrorism threats.
    The procession was generally peaceful, marked by zero casualties and more than 1,000 people injured mostly due to hypertension, according to figures from the Philippine Red Cross (PRC).
    In its 1:00 a.m. report  on Wednesday, the PRC said more than 400 were reported injured from from over a thousand devotees it tended throughout the six-kilometer procession. /atm

    Read more: http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/958888/nazarene-back-in-quiapo-church-after-22-hour-procession#ixzz53rKlN5HP
    Follow us: @inquirerdotnet on Twitter | inquirerdotnet on Facebook

    http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/958888/nazarene-back-in-quiapo-church-after-22-hour-procession


    Offline poche

    • Hero Member
    • *****
    • Posts: 13284
    • Reputation: +430/-843
    • Gender: Male
    Re: The Black Nazarene
    « Reply #2 on: January 12, 2018, 04:01:33 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • For over four centuries, a historical and iconic miraculous statue of Jesus Christ carrying his Cross has become an emblem of passion, struggle and faith for Filipino Catholics.
    The life-size statue of Jesus is enshrined in the famous minor basilica popularly known as the Quiapo Church, located in the Archdiocese of Manila. The statue has survived the blazing fires that destroyed the church twice, two earthquakes, the floods of numerous typhoons and bombings during World War II.
    The church which hosts the statue never sleeps. It welcomes devotees early in the morning till late evening. During the day, it holds continuous Masses and healing services. During the night, the church shelters poor homeless people. In the early morning, the church is cleaned and again reaches out to the pilgrims and devotees.
    Every year on Jan. 9, the annual feast day, millions of devotees gather to celebrate the Feast of the Black Nazarene. They take part in the spectacular religious procession known locally as the “Traslacion,” during which devotees carry a replica of the statue across Manila.
    Up to 18 million participants take part in the annual procession and the festivities that surround it.
    Pope Innocent X specially recognized the Philippines’ strong devotion to the Black Nazarene of Manila in 1650.
    Msgr. Jose Clemente Ignacio, the rector of the Minor Basilica of the Black Nazarene, said that some people wait in line for seven hours without complaint, simply to touch the image.
    “They say Filipinos are resilient, but where is this resiliency coming from? It’s the practice of our faith,” he told CNA.
    Msgr. Ignacio spoke more about the Black Nazarene and its related devotions. The text of the interview is below, edited for clarity and brevity.

    https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/understanding-the-fierce-devotion-behind-the-black-nazarene-83225

    Offline poche

    • Hero Member
    • *****
    • Posts: 13284
    • Reputation: +430/-843
    • Gender: Male
    Re: The Black Nazarene
    « Reply #3 on: January 17, 2018, 03:53:25 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • CNA:  Could you describe Quiapo Church for us?
    Msgr Ignacio: The church is one of the most popular churches in the country as it is home to the miraculous Black Nazarene, a much-venerated statue of Jesus Christ which many people believe has miraculous attributes.
    St. John Paul II recognized the church as the Minor Basilica of the Black Nazarene because of its role in strengthening a deep popular devotion to Jesus Christ and because of its cultural contribution to the religiosity of the Filipino people.


    https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/understanding-the-fierce-devotion-behind-the-black-nazarene-83225

    Offline poche

    • Hero Member
    • *****
    • Posts: 13284
    • Reputation: +430/-843
    • Gender: Male
    Re: The Black Nazarene
    « Reply #4 on: January 18, 2018, 04:37:15 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • CNA: What is the historical background of the Black Nazarene statue of Quiapo?
    Msgr. Ignacio:  A first group of Augustinian Recollect missionaries landed in Manila in 1606 from Mexico. They brought with them a dark image of Jesus Christ kneeling on one knee and carrying a large wooden cross. The image was first enshrined in St. John the Baptist Church at Luneta in 1606 and after two years was moved to a bigger church nearby. Over a century and a half later, in 1767, the image was transferred to Quiapo Church whose patron is also St. John the Baptist.
    In 2006, we celebrated the 400th anniversary of the arrival of the image of Black Nazarene in Manila.


    https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/understanding-the-fierce-devotion-behind-the-black-nazarene-83225


    Offline poche

    • Hero Member
    • *****
    • Posts: 13284
    • Reputation: +430/-843
    • Gender: Male
    Re: The Black Nazarene
    « Reply #5 on: January 25, 2018, 02:02:38 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • CNA:  Explain to us the devotion to the Black Nazarene at Quiapo.
    Msgr. Ignacio: In the words of Archbishop of Manila, Cardinal Luis Antonio Tagle, “To understand the devotee you have to be a devotee. Only a devotee could best understand a devotee.”
    People have sensed the spiritual wealth in Quiapo Church and there is a huge attendance for Mass every day and especially on Friday.
    However, it’s the feast day that gathers together millions of devotees who walk in the procession, called the “Traslacion” of the Black Nazarene. Here in Quiapo Church you can witness many stories of the faith of the people, those who are patiently lining up for seven hours without any complaints. They just want to pray and touch the image of Black Nazarene. There are huge queues for confessions.
    They say Filipinos are resilient, but where is this resiliency coming from? It’s the practice of our faith. 


    https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/understanding-the-fierce-devotion-behind-the-black-nazarene-83225

    Offline poche

    • Hero Member
    • *****
    • Posts: 13284
    • Reputation: +430/-843
    • Gender: Male
    Re: The Black Nazarene
    « Reply #6 on: January 27, 2018, 02:03:11 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • NA: Tell us more about the procession called “Traslacion” of the Black Nazarene.
    Msgr. Ignacio: “Traslacion” means the transfer of the Image of Black Nazarene. In a way it is imitating the Calvary experience: the sacrifice and suffering that our Lord endured for our salvation like when Jesus was walking barefoot, carrying the cross to Mount Calvary.
    The devotees also want to give back to God by participating in the suffering of our Lord and entering into the Paschal mystery of Christ.
    It is also commemorating the transfer of the image from Lunetta to Quiapo, when we first received the statue in 1868. Since then, because of the many answered prayers, people have been celebrating the feast on January 9.
    The barefoot procession of an almost 4.3-mile journey starts from the Quirino Grandstand at Luneta and snakes its way towards the narrow streets. Passing through the city’s winding roads, after 19 hours of spiritual euphoria, the procession eventually reaches Quiapo at the Basilica Minore de Nazareno. The devotees flood by to touch the image and throw cloths to touch the image, before receiving the cloths back. 
    Our culture is a culture of touch and, significantly, in a way we want to touch heaven.

    https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/understanding-the-fierce-devotion-behind-the-black-nazarene-83225

    Offline poche

    • Hero Member
    • *****
    • Posts: 13284
    • Reputation: +430/-843
    • Gender: Male
    Re: The Black Nazarene
    « Reply #7 on: January 29, 2018, 04:19:12 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • NA: How do you explain this popular devotion and its importance to bring people to faith?
     
    Msgr. Ignacio: Maybe in the past in the Western world the contemplatives' experience of undergoing retreats in monasteries, retreat houses etc. was a contemplative way of entering into the mystery of Christ.
    But there was also another, lay-focused way of having retreats by making pilgrimages. St. Francis of Assisi, St. Anthony, St Ignatius of Loyola--they also undertook pilgrimages which involved suffering and bodily penance in the process of entering into the Paschal mystery of Christ.
    The devotion in Quiapo is somewhat similar to a pilgrimage experience and every year they come and somehow something changes in the people.
    Popular religiosity is not being encouraged because there are elements that need purification... but we cannot dismiss this, because through popular piety our faith has been introduced in our home and in our families. We have been introduced to the prayers, the Rosary, the statues of the saints, the Way of the Cross.
    Somehow it has a value and I guess the people here know that there is a very deep gold mine of the spiritual fruits that they can experience in Quiapo Church.
    Somehow some theologians have not fully grasped this wealth that is these popular religious devotions. The Second Vatican Council encourages them and does not dismiss them. Pope Francis is asking us to support and strengthen, understand and find meaning in popular piety.

    https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/understanding-the-fierce-devotion-behind-the-black-nazarene-83225


    Offline poche

    • Hero Member
    • *****
    • Posts: 13284
    • Reputation: +430/-843
    • Gender: Male
    Re: The Black Nazarene
    « Reply #8 on: February 02, 2018, 11:12:19 PM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • CNA: Tell us more about the procession called “Traslacion” of the Black Nazarene.
    Msgr. Ignacio: “Traslacion” means the transfer of the Image of Black Nazarene. In a way it is imitating the Calvary experience: the sacrifice and suffering that our Lord endured for our salvation like when Jesus was walking barefoot, carrying the cross to Mount Calvary.
    The devotees also want to give back to God by participating in the suffering of our Lord and entering into the Paschal mystery of Christ.
    It is also commemorating the transfer of the image from Lunetta to Quiapo, when we first received the statue in 1868. Since then, because of the many answered prayers, people have been celebrating the feast on January 9.
    The barefoot procession of an almost 4.3-mile journey starts from the Quirino Grandstand at Luneta and snakes its way towards the narrow streets. Passing through the city’s winding roads, after 19 hours of spiritual euphoria, the procession eventually reaches Quiapo at the Basilica Minore de Nazareno. The devotees flood by to touch the image and throw cloths to touch the image, before receiving the cloths back.  
    Our culture is a culture of touch and, significantly, in a way we want to touch heaven.

    https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/understanding-the-fierce-devotion-behind-the-black-nazarene-83225

    Offline poche

    • Hero Member
    • *****
    • Posts: 13284
    • Reputation: +430/-843
    • Gender: Male
    Re: The Black Nazarene
    « Reply #9 on: February 05, 2018, 11:39:30 PM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • CNA: How do you explain this popular devotion and its importance to bring people to faith?

    Msgr. Ignacio: Maybe in the past in the Western world the contemplatives' experience of undergoing retreats in monasteries, retreat houses etc. was a contemplative way of entering into the mystery of Christ.
    But there was also another, lay-focused way of having retreats by making pilgrimages. St. Francis of Assisi, St. Anthony, St Ignatius of Loyola--they also undertook pilgrimages which involved suffering and bodily penance in the process of entering into the Paschal mystery of Christ.
    The devotion in Quiapo is somewhat similar to a pilgrimage experience and every year they come and somehow something changes in the people.
    Popular religiosity is not being encouraged because there are elements that need purification... but we cannot dismiss this, because through popular piety our faith has been introduced in our home and in our families. We have been introduced to the prayers, the Rosary, the statues of the saints, the Way of the Cross.
    Somehow it has a value and I guess the people here know that there is a very deep gold mine of the spiritual fruits that they can experience in Quiapo Church.
    Somehow some theologians have not fully grasped this wealth that is these popular religious devotions. The Second Vatican Council encourages them and does not dismiss them. Pope Francis is asking us to support and strengthen, understand and find meaning in popular piety.

    https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/understanding-the-fierce-devotion-behind-the-black-nazarene-83225

     

    Sitemap 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16