Author Topic: Book Club recommendations  (Read 294 times)

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Offline Fluidicpuppet

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Book Club recommendations
« on: April 07, 2020, 09:02:44 AM »
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  • Me and some friends from my church are planning to do a book club online where we read and discuss a book while on lσcкdσωn. Do you have any recommendations for a traditional Catholic book that would be good for this purpose?

    Online Mithrandylan

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    Re: Book Club recommendations
    « Reply #1 on: April 07, 2020, 09:49:48 AM »
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  • A traditional Catholic book or a book for traditional Catholics?  Not sure if you're looking to read a devotional book or just a book that would generate good conversation among friends (with Catholic themes and the like).
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    Brideshead Revisited comes to mind.  It'll give you loads to talk about.
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    If you're looking for something explicitly devotional, you might read The Christian Father (if you're parents) or a classic in spirituality like S. Francis de Sales Introduction to the Devout Life
    More Catholic Discussion: http://thetradforum.com


    Offline Viva Cristo Rey

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    Re: Book Club recommendations
    « Reply #2 on: April 07, 2020, 02:18:27 PM »
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  • Me and some friends from my church are planning to do a book club online where we read and discuss a book while on lσcкdσωn. Do you have any recommendations for a traditional Catholic book that would be good for this purpose?
    St. Francis de Sales: Introduction to the Devout Life. 
    To live with the Saints in Heaven is all bliss and glory....To live with the saints on Earth is just another story!  (unknown)

    Offline songbird

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    Re: Book Club recommendations
    « Reply #3 on: April 07, 2020, 04:37:23 PM »
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  • Two come to mind.  The Cure of Ars, but for these times the Man of Tours, devotion to the Holy Face for the blasphemies of impious Jҽωs/ƈσmmυɳιsm.

    Offline StLouisIX

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    Re: Book Club recommendations
    « Reply #4 on: April 07, 2020, 05:48:00 PM »
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  • I recommend The Imitation of Christ by Thomas à Kempis, in particular the version known as My Imitation of Christ, which was produced by The Confraternity of the Precious Blood many years ago and has been reprinted.


    Offline songbird

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    Re: Book Club recommendations
    « Reply #5 on: April 07, 2020, 07:51:55 PM »
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  • My Great-great uncle was Father Rudolph Stoltz of the Confraternity of the Precious Blood.  He was ordained June of 1907.  He was Dean and then served Lincoln Nebraska Dioceses.  He died in 1944.  He left us a favor.  A letter, lost then found in 2000!  My mother wanted to know why he wanted to be a priest.  She stumbled on to the lost letter, folded 4 times.  Dated May 28, 1905 (May 28 is my mom's birth date of 1931).  The letter answered her question.  Fr. Stoltz(Peter) had a strong inclination to study for the priesthood on his Holy Eucharist day.

    Offline trad123

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    Re: Book Club recommendations
    « Reply #6 on: April 08, 2020, 08:24:29 PM »
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  • The Ideal of Reparation by Raoul Plus, S.J.

    https://archive.org/details/theidealofrepara00plusuoft/page/n5/mode/2up


    Characteristics of True Devotion by Jean Grou

    https://archive.org/details/characteristicso02grou/page/n5/mode/2up


    Right now I'm reading a book by Seneca:

    Seneca's Letters from a Stoic published by Dover, and translated by Richard Mott Gummere

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0486811247/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=0486811247&linkCode=as2&tag=httpwwwchanco-20 />

    Each letter comprises a short chapter.


    I'll give you an example of this latter book, Seneca recommends Cato or Laelius, but we could very well think of our Lord:


    Quote
    XI. ON THE BLUSH OF MODESTY

    YOUR FRIEND AND I have had a conversation. He is a man of ability; his very first words showed what spirit and understanding he possesses, and what progress he has already made. He gave me a foretaste, and he will not fail to answer thereto. For he spoke not from forethought, but was suddenly caught off his guard. When he tried to collect himself, he could scarcely banish that hue of modesty, which is a good sign in a young man; the blush that spread over his face seemed so to rise from the depths. And I feel sure that his habit of blushing will stay with him after he has strengthened his character, stripped off all his faults, and become wise. For by no wisdom can natural weaknesses of the body be removed.

    That which is implanted and inborn can be toned down by training, but not overcome. The steadiest speaker, when before the public, often breaks into a perspiration, as if he had wearied or over-heated himself; some tremble in the knees when they rise to speak; I know of some whose teeth chatter, whose tongues falter, whose lips quiver. Training and experience can never shake off this habit; nature exerts her own power and through such a weakness makes her presence known even to the strongest. I know that the blush, too, is a habit of this sort, spreading suddenly over the faces of the most dignified men. It is, indeed, more prevalent in youth, because of the warmer blood and the sensitive countenance; nevertheless, both seasoned men and aged men are affected by it. Some are most dangerous when they redden, as if they were letting all their sense of shame escape. Sulla, when the blood mantled his cheeks, was in his fiercest mood. Pompey had the most sensitive cast of countenance; he always blushed in the presence of a gathering, and especially at a public assembly. Fabianus also, I remember, reddened when he appeared as a witness before the Senate; and his embarrassment became him to a remarkable degree. Such a habit is not due to mental weakness, but to the novelty of a situation; an inexperienced person is not necessarily confused, but is usually affected, because he slips into this habit by natural tendency of the body. Just as certain men are full-blooded, so others are of a quick and mobile blood, that rushes to the face at once. As I remarked, Wisdom can never remove this habit; for if she could rub out all our faults, she would be mistress of the universe.

    Whatever is assigned to us by the terms of our birth and the blend in our constitutions, will stick with us, no matter how hard or how long the soul may have tried to master itself. And we cannot forbid these feelings any more than we can summon them. Actors in the theatre, who imitate the emotions, who portray fear and nervousness, who depict sorrow, imitate bashfulness by hanging their heads, lowering their voices, and keeping their eyes fixed and rooted upon the ground. They cannot, however, muster a blush; for the blush cannot be prevented or acquired. Wisdom will not assure us of a remedy, or give us help against it; it comes or goes unbidden, and is a law unto itself. But my letter calls for its closing sentence.

    Hear and take to heart this useful and wholesome motto: “Cherish some man of high character, and keep him ever before your eyes, living as if he were watching you, and ordering all your actions as if he beheld them.” Such, my dear Lucilius, is the counsel of Epicurus; he has quite properly given us a guardian and an attendant. We can get rid of most sins, if we have a witness who stands near us when we are likely to go wrong. The soul should have someone whom it can respect,—one by whose authority it may make even its inner shrine more hallowed. Happy is the man who can make others better, not merely when he is in their company, but even when he is in their thoughts! And happy also is he who can so revere a man as to calm and regulate himself by calling him to mind! One who can so revere another, will soon be himself worthy of reverence. Choose therefore a Cato; or, if Cato seems too severe a model, choose some Laelius, a gentler spirit. Choose a master whose life, conversation, and soul-expressing face have satisfied you; picture him always to yourself as your protector or your pattern. For we must indeed have someone according to whom we may regulate our characters; you can never straighten that which is crooked unless you use a ruler. Farewell.


    2 Corinthians 4:3-4

    And if our gospel be also hid, it is hid to them that are lost, In whom the god of this world hath blinded the minds of unbelievers, that the light of the gospel of the glory of Christ, who is the image of God, should not shine unto them.

    Offline Clemens Maria

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    Re: Book Club recommendations
    « Reply #7 on: April 08, 2020, 08:52:58 PM »
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  • If you’re not looking for something that is specifically Catholic, 1984 by George Orwell or Brave New World by Aldous Huxley might be apropos for a lσcкdσωn.  Or Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky.  Or Till We Have Faces by C S Lewis.  The Lord of the Rings by J R R Tolkien.  You can get summaries on Wikipedia to help you decide.

    If you are looking for something Catholic, you can’t go wrong with the lives of the saints.  TAN Books has a lot of very good ones.


    Offline Viva Cristo Rey

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    Re: Book Club recommendations
    « Reply #8 on: April 09, 2020, 06:21:01 PM »
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  • To live with the Saints in Heaven is all bliss and glory....To live with the saints on Earth is just another story!  (unknown)


     

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