Author Topic: Athletics in the Catholic family  (Read 2896 times)

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Offline MaterDominici

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Athletics in the Catholic family
« on: September 29, 2012, 11:49:37 PM »
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  • I know at least a couple of you guys really seem to want to talk about this, so here you go! : )

    Tell me, what does it look like in your opinion?
    When do you start? What sorts of involvement are allowed or not allowed? How far do you go with allowing and/or encouraging pursuit of athletics? How are these things different for boys vs. girls.

    There's an article out there called "The League of St. Liniment" from Integrity magazine that covers the topic and speaks very favorably of participation in sports. I honestly don't remember much of what it says, but you can find it online. I think the article focused on boy participation, but could be wrong.

    My problems with athletics usually come in the from of undesired side effects. For example, the article mentioned above was written in the 1940s, so the circumstances regarding the other participants was quite different than today where worldly influences from group settings is a serious concern for children of a young age. When it comes to female participation, you can add to the problem the issue of modesty. Neither of these are necessarily inherent to the sport, but pose real difficulties in making decisions for a Catholic family.
    "If I could only make the faithful sing the Kyrie, the Gloria, the Credo, the Sanctus and the Agnus Dei ... that would be to me the finest triumph sacred music could have, for it is in really taking part in the liturgy that the faithful will preserve their devotion. I would take the Tantum ...

    Offline Vladimir

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    « Reply #1 on: September 30, 2012, 12:21:01 AM »
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  • Martial arts for the boys. Start young.

    For the girls, maybe stick with less "martial" arts like Tai-chi, etc.

    No or very few issues of modesty there!




    Offline Marcelino

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    « Reply #2 on: September 30, 2012, 01:09:05 AM »
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  • To me sports are all about competition and making war.  I don't really see the point for girls.  It seems like they should focus on things like posture, poise, balance, flexibility (the old walking with a book balanced on her head routine, plus a lot of stretching).  Also, some kind of general fitness, everyone needs cardio, but that isn't sports.  

    Dancing is something girls usually enjoy and as long as it isn't "dirty dancing," i don't see why it could not be a part of home life.  

    Boys learn sports/fighting sports at home, from their dad and brothers.  They use books and videos to study the basics of a sport and then use each other to practice on.  That can be enough;  sort of like "home sports," to go with "home school" and it can really rock n roll, if dad sets it up (even better if he has learned to compete himself -z.e.r.-, so that he knows what he needs to teach them to win) and mom supports it.  

    Of course, with that foundation, there's all kinds of other things they can participate in, in the community, to take it further, but then they risk "exposure" to "the zombies"   :jester:


    Offline Traditional Guy 20

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    « Reply #3 on: September 30, 2012, 07:50:50 AM »
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  • Quote from: MaterDominici
    I know at least a couple of you guys really seem to want to talk about this, so here you go! : )

    Tell me, what does it look like in your opinion?
    When do you start? What sorts of involvement are allowed or not allowed? How far do you go with allowing and/or encouraging pursuit of athletics? How are these things different for boys vs. girls.

    There's an article out there called "The League of St. Liniment" from Integrity magazine that covers the topic and speaks very favorably of participation in sports. I honestly don't remember much of what it says, but you can find it online. I think the article focused on boy participation, but could be wrong.

    My problems with athletics usually come in the from of undesired side effects. For example, the article mentioned above was written in the 1940s, so the circumstances regarding the other participants was quite different than today where worldly influences from group settings is a serious concern for children of a young age. When it comes to female participation, you can add to the problem the issue of modesty. Neither of these are necessarily inherent to the sport, but pose real difficulties in making decisions for a Catholic family.


    I think it's okay to start both boys and girls in middle school. In terms of involvement well of course women shouldn't box but I have no problem with feminine sports. I would encourage athletics and physical fitness very early on and put it on equal encouragement with acedemics. For me there doesn't seem to be a difference in encouragement. Sport is used for staying healthy and that applies to both genders. For boys football, basketball, baseball, and boxing should be encouraged and for girls feminine sports and cheerleading, in my opinion at least.

    Well you know in terms of modesty some people on here think boys should run around in trousers and covered up, which is absolutely rediculous. Now I'm usually for modesty but when it comes to sports modesty has to be practical. As for the worly concerns we shouldn't go under a rock and hide ourselves in fear from it but face it head on.


    Offline Traditional Guy 20

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    « Reply #4 on: September 30, 2012, 07:59:23 AM »
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  • Quote from: Traditional Guy 20
    For boys football, basketball, baseball, and boxing should be encouraged


    And swimming and weightlifting.


    Offline Jaynek

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    « Reply #5 on: September 30, 2012, 09:12:48 AM »
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  • Quote from: Marcelino
    To me sports are all about competition and making war.  I don't really see the point for girls.  It seems like they should focus on things like posture, poise, balance, flexibility (the old walking with a book balanced on her head routine, plus a lot of stretching).  Also, some kind of general fitness, everyone needs cardio, but that isn't sports.  


    Girls/women need strength exercises too.  They are necessary for proper bone development. But I agree that sports and activities for girls should not encourage competitiveness.

    Offline PenitentWoman

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    « Reply #6 on: September 30, 2012, 10:13:44 AM »
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  • *If* a girl is interested in athletics, I think solo sports such as golf or tennis are best.

    Team sports like soccer, basketball, softball etc. do not seem feminine.

    Cheerleading would have to move back about 70 years to remove the immodesty and competitive elements.

    The reason I wish ballet was okay is because it promotes gracefulness and teaches poise. Classical ballet doesn't have the same immodesty you have to worry about in contemporary ballet, which incorporates elements of (suggestive) modern dance.

    Long tutus and ruched, modified leotards could possibly be modest. I'm not sure.

    Little girls do not need strength training beyond household chores and playing outside
    ~For we are saved by hope. But hope that is seen, is not hope. For what a man seeth, why doth he hope for? But if we hope for that which we see not, we wait for it with patience. ~ Romans 8:24-25

    Offline MaterDominici

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    « Reply #7 on: September 30, 2012, 10:58:25 PM »
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  • I saw a blog somewhere (sorry, don't remember where) in which many of the family's children participated in competitive folk dance. I thought that was pretty neat as your performace is either solo or group, but either way, you choose/design your own costumes. I got the impression that they learned how to do these dances from their parents, though, so I don't know how easy it would be to find someone to teach this sort of thing.
    "If I could only make the faithful sing the Kyrie, the Gloria, the Credo, the Sanctus and the Agnus Dei ... that would be to me the finest triumph sacred music could have, for it is in really taking part in the liturgy that the faithful will preserve their devotion. I would take the Tantum ...


    Offline MaterDominici

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    « Reply #8 on: September 30, 2012, 11:11:27 PM »
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  • Quote from: MaterDominici
    I saw a blog somewhere (sorry, don't remember where) in which many of the family's children participated in competitive folk dance. I thought that was pretty neat as your performace is either solo or group, but either way, you choose/design your own costumes. I got the impression that they learned how to do these dances from their parents, though, so I don't know how easy it would be to find someone to teach this sort of thing.


    OK, I did a Winnie-the-Pooh "think. think. think." and remembered the blog name.  :smile:

    This is where I saw it:
    http://starryskyranch.typepad.com/starry_sky_ranch/2012/03/gone-feising.html
    It looks like they were living in Germany at the time and so their children were in a German folk dance studio there and did a bit of traveling in Europe for competition. That's my impression right now, anyhow.
    "If I could only make the faithful sing the Kyrie, the Gloria, the Credo, the Sanctus and the Agnus Dei ... that would be to me the finest triumph sacred music could have, for it is in really taking part in the liturgy that the faithful will preserve their devotion. I would take the Tantum ...

    Offline PenitentWoman

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    « Reply #9 on: September 30, 2012, 11:15:46 PM »
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  • That's neat...minus the outfits.  ;)

    I took an Irish Jig class once. That was lots of fun.
    ~For we are saved by hope. But hope that is seen, is not hope. For what a man seeth, why doth he hope for? But if we hope for that which we see not, we wait for it with patience. ~ Romans 8:24-25

    Offline Marcelino

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    « Reply #10 on: October 01, 2012, 01:16:06 AM »
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  • Quote from: Jaynek
    Quote from: Marcelino
    To me sports are all about competition and making war.  I don't really see the point for girls.  It seems like they should focus on things like posture, poise, balance, flexibility (the old walking with a book balanced on her head routine, plus a lot of stretching).  Also, some kind of general fitness, everyone needs cardio, but that isn't sports.  


    Girls/women need strength exercises too.  They are necessary for proper bone development. But I agree that sports and activities for girls should not encourage competitiveness.


    Yeah, i know, for "toning."  
     :roll-laugh1:


    (yes, i am six years old)  



    Offline Marcelino

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    « Reply #11 on: October 01, 2012, 01:29:39 AM »
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  • Seriously, i think basic cardio and calesthentics are sufficient for everyone's health, but men need to take that further, in order to reach their goals.  Men do get buy without it, but I don't know any man who ever said, gee, i wish i played less sports or gosh, i wish i didn't punch like a jack hammer.  

    I don't know why women would need to get involved in sports;  it seems like it would be a diversion (as in not getting closer to their goals).  That kind of ballet p.w. was talking about i could see, because it seems like that sort of affirms that traditional female ideal, of virtue and grace.  




    Offline Marcelino

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    « Reply #12 on: October 01, 2012, 01:31:38 AM »
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  • Offline Marcelino

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    « Reply #13 on: October 01, 2012, 01:32:48 AM »
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  • Offline poche

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    « Reply #14 on: October 05, 2012, 03:16:58 AM »
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  • Evangelization is not the domain of just a few priests and nuns, it is the responsability of everybody. When somebody has a particular talent or gift, that could become a vehicle for the evangelization of the Catholic faith, Remember how during the Olympics the runner who ran with the image of the blessed Virgin. Of course, it's incumbant on parents to give a good formation to their children so that they will be able to engage the world in a constructive manner and give glory to God.

     

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