Author Topic: Spelling Challenge  (Read 6934 times)

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Offline Nadir

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Re: Spelling Challenge
« Reply #105 on: April 11, 2019, 05:42:11 PM »
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  • It might help to know the derivation: from Latin, 3rd person singular of the word "to hold", i.e. Tenet - he holds.

    By the way this post got thumbs up from me.

    Offline Kazimierz

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #106 on: April 11, 2019, 09:50:12 PM »
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  • Truly thou art tenacious ;)
    Da pacem Domine in diebus nostris
    Qui non est alius
    Qui pugnet pro nobis
    Nisi  tu Deus noster


    Offline Nadir

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #107 on: December 13, 2019, 01:23:32 AM »
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  • I've been a bit slack lately.

    Here's a common error:

    Anti-semetic political thought crime division in NYPD

    Think of the noun 'semite', then make it the adjective: semitic.

    Offline Nadir

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #108 on: December 13, 2019, 01:48:53 AM »
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  • This is from Anonymous who recommends improving skills to Anonymous.


    Quote
    Than he needs to develop the skills and / or education to earn that wage.  No one owes him noanything#, regardless if of he has no kids or a dozen.
    Someone (singular) wants a living wage? Than they he (requires singular pronoun) needs (matching verb for singular pronoun) to figure out how much they he needs to earn and then do what they he have has to do to develop the skills and knowledge to earn it.  
    It is no one else’s responsibility to take care of you...or your family.
    The confounding of then and than:
    Than is used in comparisons as a conjunction, as in "she is younger than I am," and as a preposition, "he is taller than me."
    Then indicates time. It is used as an adverb, "I lived in Idaho then," noun, "we'll have to wait until then," and adjective, "the then governor."

    # A double negative makes for a positive.

    Offline Kazimierz

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #109 on: December 13, 2019, 09:03:56 AM »
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  • Doubleplusgood  ;)
    Da pacem Domine in diebus nostris
    Qui non est alius
    Qui pugnet pro nobis
    Nisi  tu Deus noster


    Offline Nadir

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #110 on: February 04, 2020, 02:19:56 AM »
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  • Quote
    ...pretenses from a bad shepard, versus an individual believing they were healed of terminal ailments (via a bad shepard

    shep·herd
      (shĕp′ərd)
    n.
    1. One who herds, guards, and tends sheep.
    2. One who cares for and guides a group of people, as a minister or teacher.
    3. A German shepherd.

    ...

    [Middle English shepherde, from Old English scēaphierde : scēapsheep + hierdeherdsman.]

    Offline Nadir

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #111 on: August 01, 2020, 04:31:40 AM »
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  • So as not to derail the "Bishup (sic) Pfeiffer's Santeria Warlock" thread I am reviving this one:

    Quote
    This forum has archived rheems reams of information about strange and occult behavior of Father's sidekick.

    https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/ream

    Offline Nadir

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #112 on: October 02, 2020, 06:58:09 PM »
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  • Quote
    "Equity" for these people simply means "Re-distribution of wealth".

    another words, they intend to STEAL what you worked for ...
    Correction:
    Quote
    "Equity" for these people simply means "Re-distribution of wealth", in other words, they intend to STEAL what you worked for ...
    By using incorrect pronunciation, we internalise what we hear. Thus develops common usage of incorrect grammar.

    Clue: “another” is singular (an-other); “words” is plural.

    “An” is an adjective (isn’t it?) while “in” is a preposition.


    Offline claudel

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #113 on: October 03, 2020, 03:44:19 PM »
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  • “An” is an adjective (isn’t it?) while “in” is a preposition.

    Broadly, yes, although with a and the, an falls into the special category called "articles." Prior to 1800 or so, an was also used as a conjunction with the same meaning as if. Shakespeare's plays are full of instances where characters say "An it were true, then …" or something similar. Indeed, there might even still be rural or backwoods people in places such as Yorkshire and Kentucky who use conjunctional an. There certainly were when I was a boy sixty-plus years ago.

    Offline Nadir

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #114 on: October 03, 2020, 08:34:39 PM »
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  • Of course! It’s called an article. Why wouldn’t that come to mind?

    Thanks for the information, Claudel. Fascinating.

    Offline claudel

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #115 on: October 04, 2020, 12:24:49 AM »
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  • By using incorrect pronunciation, we internalise what we hear.

    When I wrote my earlier comment, Nadir, I meant to remark upon the very apt sentence above, but I simply forgot to. The phenomenon that the sentence points to is as characteristic of the way (i.e., the unfortunate way) young people learn nowadays as a related but also contrary phenomenon was characteristic of learning in most of the prior thousand years and more. Since ever fewer people now seem to read for pleasure, instruction, or information—most seem to reflexively look to videos for everything—the tendency when writing is simply to try to spell out, more or less faithfully, the usually badly pronounced words and crude usages of the speakers one hears. That the result often tends more to the catastrophic than the successful should hardly come as a surprise.

    The problem, of course, is that a large, flexible, responsive vocabulary and a comprehensive grasp of the tools available to one who has mastered the complexities of English grammar and semantics are not things that anyone ever acquired through listening to people talk, especially in the informal and familiar manner that everyone has come to expect in almost every contemporary situation, even funerals! For centuries it was common to hear students and young people mispronounce words that they had encountered only in reading but wanted to make part of their active vocabulary. (I was well into my thirties before I learned that I had been mispronouncing "Chimaera" since I first saw the word in the Iliad in high school!) Such errors, of course, were praiseworthy in that they were the side effects of a laudable desire for self-betterment. Would that we encountered more of them today!


    Offline forlorn

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #116 on: October 04, 2020, 02:21:02 PM »
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  • For centuries it was common to hear students and young people mispronounce words that they had encountered only in reading but wanted to make part of their active vocabulary. (I was well into my thirties before I learned that I had been mispronouncing "Chimaera" since I first saw the word in the Iliad in high school!) Such errors, of course, were praiseworthy in that they were the side effects of a laudable desire for self-betterment. Would that we encountered more of them today!
    Kai-mera?

    Woops...  :laugh1:

    Offline claudel

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #117 on: October 04, 2020, 05:47:55 PM »
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  • Kai-mera?

    Woops...

    You're easily amused, aren't you?

    Offline Nadir

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #118 on: November 18, 2020, 04:12:38 AM »
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  • Quote
    In my opinion, I think he would of loved to speak in front of this huge crowd of true Americans, but was probably told by his lawyers not to.  Also, I think it would not of been safe standing in front of millions of people….

     
    The abbreviated spoken form would’ve, for would have, causes the confusion here.


    Correction:

    In my opinion, I think he would have (would’ve) loved to speak in front of this huge crowd of true Americans, but was probably told by his lawyers not to.  Also, I think it would not have been safe standing in front of millions of people….
     
    subject + would + have + past participle


     

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