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Offline Pelly

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What happens in this case?
« on: February 26, 2015, 11:18:57 AM »
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  • This year, Good Friday will be on a First Friday.
    What should have to be done? (You know, there is neither Mass nor Communion Service on that day)

    Offline Nadir

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    What happens in this case?
    « Reply #1 on: February 26, 2015, 03:16:54 PM »
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  • The Good Friday Liturgy takes priority over the devotion of the first Fridays.


    Offline Miseremini

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    What happens in this case?
    « Reply #2 on: February 26, 2015, 05:57:27 PM »
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  • This has happened many times since the start of the devotion.

    We were told that Good Friday counted as part of the 9  then when Communion was given on Good Friday that of course solved the problem as Communion is part of the devotion not Mass.

    Nadir is of course right,  Good Friday takes priority over the devotion, but you don't have to start the devotion all over again.

     :geezer:
    "Let God arise, and let His enemies be scattered: and them that hate Him flee from before His Holy Face"  Psalm 67:2[/b]


    Offline steelcross

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    What happens in this case?
    « Reply #3 on: February 26, 2015, 09:20:00 PM »
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  • Good to know. :)

    Offline poche

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    What happens in this case?
    « Reply #4 on: March 19, 2015, 11:38:50 PM »
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  • Fr Mcnamara gave what I think is a good response to this same question.

     Q: I have been making an effort to complete the nine Masses for First Friday devotion. April will be my eighth month, but there is no Mass on the first Friday -- it is Good Friday. I will be attending Good Friday service and receive the Eucharist. How does this affect the devotion? Does it count for No. 8, or will May be No. 8, or does May become No. 1 because there was no Mass? -- M.W.

    A: Our correspondent is referring to the last of the so-called 12 promises of the Sacred Heart to St. Margaret Mary Alacoque (1647-1690). These promises are the following:

    1. "I will give them all the graces necessary in their state of life."

    2. "I will establish peace in their homes."

    3. "I will comfort them in their afflictions."

    4. "I will be their secure refuge during life, and above all in death."

    5. "I will bestow a large blessing upon all their undertakings."

    6. "Sinners shall find in my Heart the source and the infinite ocean of mercy."

    7. "Tepid souls shall grow fervent."

    8. "Fervent souls shall quickly mount to high perfection."

    9. "I will bless every place where a picture of My Heart shall be set up and honored."

    10. "I will give to priests the gift of touching the most hardened hearts."

    11. "Those who shall promote this devotion shall have their names written in My Heart, never to be blotted out."

    12. "I promise thee in the excessive mercy of my Heart that my all-powerful love will grant to all those who communicate on the First Friday in nine consecutive months, the grace of final penitence; they shall not die in my disgrace nor without receiving the sacraments; my divine Heart shall be their safe refuge in this last moment."

    Since the promise of No. 12 refers to receiving Communion, and not to attending Mass, I think it is safe to say that reception of Communion at the Good Friday Celebration of the Lord's Passion is more than sufficient to comply with the requirements of this devotional practice. At the same time, when Mass is available on the other first Fridays, it is always preferable to communicate within Mass if possible.

    According to this devotion, the first Friday of each month was designated by Jesus himself as consecrated to honoring his Sacred Heart, to increase our love for him and to make reparation for past and present offenses against his love.

    The list of 12 promises has sometimes been the object of some controversy. These are not found -- as a list -- in the writings of St. Margaret Mary but are scattered about these writings in different forms and dates.

    A- A A+ http://www.zenit.org/en/articles/first-friday-devotion-and-good-friday
    First Friday Devotion and Good Friday
    TweetRome, March 17, 2015 (Zenit.org) Father Edward McNamara, LC | 1148 hits

    Answered by Legionary of Christ Father Edward McNamara, professor of liturgy and dean of theology at the Regina Apostolorum university.


    Q: I have been making an effort to complete the nine Masses for First Friday devotion. April will be my eighth month, but there is no Mass on the first Friday -- it is Good Friday. I will be attending Good Friday service and receive the Eucharist. How does this affect the devotion? Does it count for No. 8, or will May be No. 8, or does May become No. 1 because there was no Mass? -- M.W.

    A: Our correspondent is referring to the last of the so-called 12 promises of the Sacred Heart to St. Margaret Mary Alacoque (1647-1690). These promises are the following:

    1. "I will give them all the graces necessary in their state of life."

    2. "I will establish peace in their homes."

    3. "I will comfort them in their afflictions."

    4. "I will be their secure refuge during life, and above all in death."

    5. "I will bestow a large blessing upon all their undertakings."

    6. "Sinners shall find in my Heart the source and the infinite ocean of mercy."

    7. "Tepid souls shall grow fervent."

    8. "Fervent souls shall quickly mount to high perfection."

    9. "I will bless every place where a picture of My Heart shall be set up and honored."

    10. "I will give to priests the gift of touching the most hardened hearts."

    11. "Those who shall promote this devotion shall have their names written in My Heart, never to be blotted out."

    12. "I promise thee in the excessive mercy of my Heart that my all-powerful love will grant to all those who communicate on the First Friday in nine consecutive months, the grace of final penitence; they shall not die in my disgrace nor without receiving the sacraments; my divine Heart shall be their safe refuge in this last moment."

    Since the promise of No. 12 refers to receiving Communion, and not to attending Mass, I think it is safe to say that reception of Communion at the Good Friday Celebration of the Lord's Passion is more than sufficient to comply with the requirements of this devotional practice. At the same time, when Mass is available on the other first Fridays, it is always preferable to communicate within Mass if possible.

    According to this devotion, the first Friday of each month was designated by Jesus himself as consecrated to honoring his Sacred Heart, to increase our love for him and to make reparation for past and present offenses against his love.

    The list of 12 promises has sometimes been the object of some controversy. These are not found -- as a list -- in the writings of St. Margaret Mary but are scattered about these writings in different forms and dates.

    The list was first tabulated in a booklet published in French in 1863. In 1882 Philip Kemper, a wealthy German-American businessman from Dayton, Ohio, spread this list throughout the world, printing a huge amount of cards with the promises in some 238 languages.

    Although Kemper received a papal blessing for this "pious" and "useful" work from Pope Leo XIII in 1895, not all were in full agreement. For example, French Cardinal Adolph Perraud (1828-1906) considered that the promises in tabular form were different from the words and expressions used by St. Margaret Mary and would have preferred the original words to be used. For instance, while the published promises are in direct speech, St. Margaret Mary always used indirect speech: "Our Lord has made known to me that he would bless the homes in which the image of my heart .…" The direct form could indicate the Jesus dictated them to the visionary, which is not usually the case.

    There are also a number of instances in which words have been changed. For example, the 10th promise reads, "I will give priests the power of softening the hardest hearts." In her letter to Father John Croiset (circa 1650-1738), her spiritual director and first biographer, Alacoque wrote, "My divine Master has made it known to me that those who labor for the salvation of souls shall be successful in their labors and shall have the art of touching the most hardened hearts, if they have a tender devotion to his Heart and if they labor to inspire everyone with it and to establish it everywhere."

    These critiques would not appear to change the fundamental meaning of the promises and especially the 12th, as it appears in the saint's writings: "On Friday during Holy Communion, He said these words to His unworthy slave, if I mistake not: I promise you in the excessive mercy of my Heart that its all-powerful love will grant to all those who receive Holy Communion on nine first Fridays of consecutive months the grace of final repentance; they will not die under my displeasure or without receiving their sacraments, my divine Heart making itself their assured refuge at the last moment."

    Generally speaking, those who promote this devotion place the following conditions or recommendations so as to avoid this holy practice becoming something automatic or magical:

    (1) that Our Lord required Communion to be received on a particular day chosen by him;

    (2) that the nine Fridays must be consecutive;

    (3) that they must be made in honor of his Sacred Heart, which means that those who make the nine Fridays must practice the devotion and must have a great love for our Lord;

    (4) that Our Lord does not say that those who make the nine Fridays will be dispensed from any of their obligations or from exercising the vigilance necessary to lead a good life and overcome temptation; rather, he implicitly promises abundant graces to those who make the nine Fridays to help them to carry out these obligations and persevere to the end;

    (5) that perseverance in receiving Communion for nine consecutive First Fridays helps the faithful to acquire the habit of frequent Communion, which Our Lord eagerly desires; and

    (6) that the practice of the nine Fridays is very pleasing to Our Lord since he promises such great reward, and that all Catholics should endeavor to make the nine Fridays.

    http://www.zenit.org/en/articles/first-friday-devotion-and-good-friday


    Offline PerEvangelicaDicta

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    What happens in this case?
    « Reply #5 on: March 21, 2015, 12:44:17 AM »
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  • Holy Communion distributed on Good Friday in traditional churches?   I've not observed this.

    Offline Miseremini

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    What happens in this case?
    « Reply #6 on: April 09, 2015, 07:51:38 PM »
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  • BUMP
    "Let God arise, and let His enemies be scattered: and them that hate Him flee from before His Holy Face"  Psalm 67:2[/b]


    Offline Nadir

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    What happens in this case?
    « Reply #7 on: April 10, 2015, 01:17:10 AM »
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  • Quote from: PerEvangelicaDicta
    Holy Communion distributed on Good Friday in traditional churches?   I've not observed this.


    As long as I remember there has been Holy Communion distributed on Good Friday. The Sacred Hosts had been consecrated on Holy Thursday.

    I am rarely able to attend since I left the NO but before the changes we had Holy Communion on Good Friday.

    Did a search and found this:

    http://www.catholiceducation.org/en/culture/catholic-contributions/mass-of-the-pre-sanctified.html

    Quote
    Mass of the Pre-Sanctified
    FR. WILLIAM SAUNDERS
    What is the Mass of the Pre-sanctified?

    PiusXII2.JPG
    Pope Pius XII

    On Good Friday, we celebrate the Liturgy of the Passion. Since the earliest times of the Church, no Mass has been offered on Good Friday. Instead the service has consisted of a solemn procession, readings (including the Passion in the Gospel of St. John), a series of petitions, the veneration of the cross, and a Communion service. The simple Communion service includes the recitation of the Our Father, the proclamation "This is the Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world, happy are those who are called to His Supper," and then the reception of Holy Communion (which was consecrated at the Holy Thursday Mass of the Lords Supper) by the celebrant and the faithful. The omission of Mass reflects the deep sorrow the Church has in remembering the sacrifice of our Lord on the first Good Friday.

    The reception of Holy Communion was introduced to the Good Friday Liturgy about the year 800. Prior to that time, there was simply the service of readings, a series of petitions and the veneration of the cross. Because the Holy Eucharist is the best way that the memory of the passion of our Lord is renewed, the distribution of Holy Communion (again, consecrated the evening before at the Mass of the Lords Supper) became the practice, and both the celebrant and the faithful received.

    Unfortunately, the distribution became restricted to the celebrant alone in the late Middle Ages, a restriction officially mandated in the 1600s. Instead of the simple Communion Service, there was now "The Mass of the Pre-sanctified," which proceeded as follows: After the veneration of the cross, a procession formed and proceeded to the place where the Holy Eucharist had been reposed after the Holy Thursday Mass of the Lords Supper. The idea of the reposition being that the Lord had been "entombed." The Holy Eucharist (the large priests Host specifically) was then placed in a chalice and carried back to the altar in procession with lit candles. The celebrant and other ministers then approached the altar to celebrate "The Mass of the Pre-sanctified." (Note that although called "Mass," it was not a true Mass because there was no sacrifice and consecration. The Host had already been consecrated, hence "pre-sanctified.") The celebrant then incensed the Blessed Sacrament. The Host was then placed on the paten, and then the corporal, without the saying of any prayers. The deacon then placed wine in the chalice, and the subdeacon, water, with no blessings or prayers offered by them or the celebrant. The celebrant then incensed the "oblation" (i.e. referring to the Sacred Host and the chalice with the water and wine even though again technically there was no sacrifice), the cross and the altar. The celebrant then said to the people, "Pray, brethren, that my sacrifice and yours may be acceptable to God, the almighty Father." After the recitation of the Our Father, the celebrant elevated the Host so that it could be viewed by the people, and consumed the Host and then the chalice of wine in which he had placed a fragment of the Host. Given this description, one could see how it was like a Mass but not a Mass. After receiving Holy Communion, the priest concluded the liturgy similarly as we do today, and then he and the other ministers processed from the church.

    Pope Pius XII in 1955 (when he issued a new Holy Week Ordinal) suppressed the "Mass of the Pre-sanctified" to avoid the confusion of there being a Mass. He also reinstituted the distribution of Holy Communion for the faithful. The Liturgy of the Passion celebrated today therefore better reflects the practice of the early Church.



    Offline AlanF

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    What happens in this case?
    « Reply #8 on: April 10, 2015, 07:33:02 AM »
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  • Whoops, I didn't see this thread, then went and started another one on the same topic.

    Quote from: Miseremini
    This has happened many times since the start of the devotion.

    We were told that Good Friday counted as part of the 9  then when Communion was given on Good Friday that of course solved the problem as Communion is part of the devotion not Mass.

    Nadir is of course right,  Good Friday takes priority over the devotion, but you don't have to start the devotion all over again.

     :geezer:


    Interesting. So it would count as one of the nine even if one doesn't receive Holy Communion?

    Offline AlanF

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    What happens in this case?
    « Reply #9 on: April 10, 2015, 07:34:41 AM »
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  • Quote from: PerEvangelicaDicta
    Holy Communion distributed on Good Friday in traditional churches?   I've not observed this.


    It's a post-1955 thing. Pius XII replaced the Mass of the Pre-Sanctified with a Communion Service, just like in the Novus Ordo service. Churches that follow the 1962 missal will have Communion on Good Friday.

    Offline Miseremini

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    What happens in this case?
    « Reply #10 on: April 10, 2015, 10:26:24 AM »
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  • Quote from: AlanF
    Whoops, I didn't see this thread, then went and started another one on the same topic.

    Quote from: Miseremini
    This has happened many times since the start of the devotion.

    We were told that Good Friday counted as part of the 9  then when Communion was given on Good Friday that of course solved the problem as Communion is part of the devotion not Mass.

    Nadir is of course right,  Good Friday takes priority over the devotion, but you don't have to start the devotion all over again.

     :geezer:


    Interesting. So it would count as one of the nine even if one doesn't receive Holy Communion?


    Yes it would count and when you think about it it makes sense.
    The whole idea of the 9 Fridays is to make reparation.
    On Good Friday the whole day is spent in reparation.
    The denial of the ability to receive Our Lord on that day is a great sorrow that can
    be offered as a sacrifice in reparation.
    Our Lord took everything into account when He requested the devotion.

     :geezer:
    "Let God arise, and let His enemies be scattered: and them that hate Him flee from before His Holy Face"  Psalm 67:2[/b]



    Offline Nadir

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    What happens in this case?
    « Reply #11 on: April 10, 2015, 05:30:53 PM »
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  • Quote from: AlanF
    Quote from: PerEvangelicaDicta
    Holy Communion distributed on Good Friday in traditional churches?   I've not observed this.


    It's a post-1955 thing. Pius XII replaced the Mass of the Pre-Sanctified with a Communion Service, just like in the Novus Ordo service. Churches that follow the 1962 missal will have Communion on Good Friday.


    AlanF, the Mass of the Pre-sanctified IS a Communion service. There is nothing Novus Ordo about it (if that is what you mean by "just like in the Novus Ordo service". The practice has changed several times over the centuries.

    Here is a quote from http://www.catholic.org/encyclopedia/view.php?id=5860

    Quote
    Good Friday is now primarily celebrated by a service combining a number of separate features. We have first the reading of three sets of lessons followed by "bidding prayers ". This probably represents a type of a liturgical service of great antiquity of which more extensive survivals remain in the Gallican and Ambrosian liturgies. The fact that the reading from the Gospel is represented by the whole Passion according to St. John is merely the accident of the day.

    Secondly there is the "Adoration" of the Cross, equally a service of great antiquity, the earliest traces of which have already been noticed in connection with Ætheria's account of Holy Week at Jerusalem. With this veneration of the Cross are now associated the Improperia (reproaches) and the hymn "Pange lingua gloriosi lauream certaminis". The Improperia, despite their curious mixture of Latin and Greek -- agios o theos ;sanctus Deus , etc. -- are probably not so extremely ancient as has been suggested by Probst and others. Although the earliest suggestion of them may be found in the Bobbio Misal, it is only in the Pontificale of Prudentius, who was Bishop of Troyes from 846 to 861, that they are clearly attested (see Edm. Bishop in "Downside Review", Dec., 1899). In the Middle Ages the "creeping to the cross" on Good Friday was a practice which inspired special devotion, and saintly monarchs like St. Louis of France set a conspicuous example of humility in their performance of it.

    Finally, the Good Friday service ends with the so-called "Mass of the Presanctified", which is of course no real sacrifice, but, strictly speaking, only a Communion service. The sacred ministers, wearing their black vestments, go to fetch the consecrated Host preserved at the altar of repose, and as they return to the high altar thechoir chant the beautiful hymn "Vexilla regis prodeunt", composed by Venantius Fortunatus. Then wine is poured into the chalice, and a sort of skeleton of the Mass is proceeded with, including an elevation of the Host after the Pater Noster. But the great consecratory prayer of the Canon, with the words of Institution, are entirely omitted. In the early Middle Ages Good Friday was quite commonly a day of general Communion, but now only those in danger of death may receive on that day.


    Offline magdalena

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    What happens in this case?
    « Reply #12 on: April 10, 2015, 10:30:27 PM »
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  • http://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2010/07/reform-of-holy-week-in-years-1951-1956.html

    Here is a pretty good article on the subject matter which has on more than one occasion  appeared on this forum.
    But one thing is necessary. Mary hath chosen the best part, which shall not be taken away from her.
    Luke 10:42

     

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