Read an Interview with Matthew, the owner of CathInfo

Author Topic: St Notburga  (Read 544 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline poche

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 14714
  • Reputation: +636/-2269
  • Gender: Male
St Notburga
« on: September 14, 2013, 03:03:02 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • Patroness of poor peasants and servants in the Tyrol. Born in Rattenberg, in the Tyrol, she was the daughter of peasants. At eighteen she became a servant in the household of Count Henry of Rattenberg When Notburga repeatedly gave food to the poor, she was dismissed by Count Henry’s wife, Ottilia, and took up a position as a servant to a humble farmer. Meanwhile, Henry suffering a run of misfortune and setbacks, wasted no time restoring Notburga to her post after his wife died. Notburga remained his housekeeper for the rest of her life, and was famous for her miracles and concern for the poor.

    http://www.catholic.org/saints/saint.php?saint_id=4875

    Offline poche

    • Hero Member
    • *****
    • Posts: 14714
    • Reputation: +636/-2269
    • Gender: Male
    St Notburga
    « Reply #1 on: September 14, 2013, 03:45:10 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • Here is more on St Notburga;
    Notburga was a cook in the household of Count Henry of Rattenberg, and used to give food to the poor. But Ottilia, her mistress, ordered her to feed any leftover food to the pigs. To continue her mission, Notburga began to save some of her own food, especially on Fridays, and brought it to the poor.

    According to her legend, one day her master met her and commanded her to show him what she was carrying. She obeyed but instead of the food he saw only shavings, and instead of wine, vinegar. As a result of Notburga's actions, Ottilia dismissed her, but soon fell dangerously ill. Notburga remained to nurse her and prepared her for death.

    Next, Notburga worked for a peasant in Eben am Achensee, on the condition that she be permitted to go to church evenings before Sundays and festivals. One evening her master urged her to continue working in the field. Throwing her sickle into the air she supposedly said: "Let my sickle be judge between me and you," and the sickle remained suspended in the air.

    In the meantime, Count Henry had suffered difficulties, which he ascribed to his dismissal of Notburga, so he rehired her. Shortly before her death she is said to have told her master to place her corpse on a wagon drawn by two oxen and to bury her wherever the oxen stood still. The oxen drew the wagon to the chapel of St. Rupert near Eben, where she was buried.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Notburga


    Offline poche

    • Hero Member
    • *****
    • Posts: 14714
    • Reputation: +636/-2269
    • Gender: Male
    St Notburga
    « Reply #2 on: October 09, 2013, 02:44:06 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • Pope Francis has written a message to Bishop Manfred Scheuer of Innsbruck, Austria, commemorating the seven hundredth anniversary of the death of St. Notburga (c. 1265-1313).

    The German-language message, dated September 3, was posted on the Vatican website on October 8.

    St. Notburga, a maidservant, was “a simple person who had to make her daily living with her own hands,” Pope Francis noted. The Pontiff paid tribute to her fidelity in small matters, her willingness to fast so as to give food to the poor, her endurance of suffering, and her devotion to the sanctification of Sunday.

    “Without sacred space and sacred time, without the Lord’s Day we cannot live,” Pope Francis wrote. “Sunday not only gives us deserved rest, but also gives us the grace of encounter with the Creator and Source of all life.”


    http://www.catholicculture.org/news/headlines/index.cfm?storyid=19292

     

    Sitemap 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16