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Offline Cantarella

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St Joseph Feast
« on: March 19, 2014, 12:48:35 AM »
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  • Prayer for the Church Militant

    O glorious St. Joseph, you were chosen by God to be the foster father of Jesus, the most pure spouse of Mary ever Virgin, and the head of the holy family. You have been chosen by Christ's Vicar as the heavenly patron and protector of the Church founded by Christ. Therefore it is with great confidence that I implore your powerful assistance for the whole Church on earth. Protect in a special manner, with true fatherly love, the Pope and all bishops and priests in communion with the See of Peter. Be the protector of all who labor for souls amid the trials and tribulations of this life, and grant that all peoples of the world may follow Christ and the Church He founded.

    Dear St. Joseph, accept the offering of myself which I now make to you. I dedicate myself to your service, that you may ever be my father, my protector, and my guide in the way of salvation. Obtain for me great purity of heart and a fervent love for the spiritual life. May all my actions, after your example, be directed to the greater glory of God, in union with the divine Heart of Jesus, the immaculate heart of Mary, and your own paternal heart. Finally, pray for me that I may share in the peace and joy of your holy death.
    If anyone says that true and natural water is not necessary for baptism and thus twists into some metaphor the words of our Lord Jesus Christ" Unless a man be born again of water and the Holy Spirit" (Jn 3:5) let him be anathema.

    Offline poche

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    St Joseph Feast
    « Reply #1 on: March 19, 2014, 03:41:53 AM »
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  • St. Joseph was an ordinary manual laborer although descended from the royal house of David. In the designs of Providence he was destined to become the spouse of the Mother of God. His high privilege is expressed in a single phrase, "Foster-father of Jesus." About him Sacred Scripture has little more to say than that he was a just man-an expression which indicates how faithfully he fulfilled his high trust of protecting and guarding God's greatest treasures upon earth, Jesus and Mary.

    The darkest hours of his life may well have been those when he first learned of Mary's pregnancy; but precisely in this time of trial Joseph showed himself great. His suffering, which likewise formed a part of the work of the redemption, was not without great providential import: Joseph was to be, for all times, the trustworthy witness of the Messiah's virgin birth. After this, he modestly retires into the background of holy Scripture.

    Of St. Joseph's death the Bible tells us nothing. There are indications, however, that he died before the beginning of Christ's public life. His was the most beautiful death that one could have, in the arms of Jesus and Mary. Humbly and unknown, he passed his years at Nazareth, silent and almost forgotten he remained in the background through centuries of Church history. Only in more recent times has he been accorded greater honor. Liturgical veneration of St. Joseph began in the fifteenth century, fostered by Sts. Brigid of Sweden and Bernadine of Siena. St. Teresa, too, did much to further his cult.

    At present there are two major feasts in his honor. On March 19 our veneration is directed to him personally and to his part in the work of redemption, while on May 1 we honor him as the patron of workmen throughout the world and as our guide in the difficult matter of establishing equitable norms regarding obligations and rights in the social order.

    http://www.catholicculture.org/culture/liturgicalyear/calendar/day.cfm?date=2014-03-19


    Offline poche

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    St Joseph Feast
    « Reply #2 on: March 19, 2014, 03:46:20 AM »
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  • The St. Joseph Altar or St. Joseph Table is an old tradition from Sicily. Here is the explanation of how the tradition started.


    DIRECTIONS
    The people of Sicily prayed. For too long there had been no rain to nourish the crops that sustained life for most of the island.

    The dried out wheat stalks cracked beneath the feet of the poor farmers as they walked through their barren fields. Only a sea of dust and withered vines remained from what had once been row upon row of brightly colored fruits and vegetables.

    And so the people prayed.

    They pleaded to St. Joseph, their patron, for relief from the famine that gripped the island. At last the skies opened, sending down the life-giving water. The people rejoiced. Some time later, to show their gratitude, they prepared a table with a special assortment of foods they had harvested. After paying honor to St. Joseph, they distributed the food to the less fortunate.

    The first St. Joseph Altar set up on the Island of Sicily was a small one, of course. But as time went on and the tradition took hold, the flamboyant nature and creative spirit of the Italians caused the altars to grow larger and more ornate.

    Today, the artistic quality of the breads, cookies and pastries, which are baked in such shapes as chalices, staffs and pyramids, often rivals the exquisite flavor of the food offerings.

    Though Sicilian immigrants introduced the custom to America, the celebration is not confined to any nationality. Rather, it has become a public event which its devoted participants embrace for a host of private and personal reasons. The feast is alternately a source of petition and thanksgiving.

    Many families believe that having a St. Joseph Altar can bring good fortune. And it is common to hear stories about favors received (a loved one's recovery from an illness, for example), which are in turn attributed to the family's dedication to St. Joseph.

    But whatever the reasons people become involved. St. Joseph's Feast Day is a tradition that centers on the entire family. One of the special customs calls for the selection of children to portray members of the Holy Family—Jesus, Mary and Joseph. Angels and favorite saints may also be included in the ritual, which begins with the "saints" going door to door to seek aid until finally reaching the place where the altar is on display.

    After the Holy Family has eaten, guests may partake of the meal. Most of the foods presented on the altar are acquired through begging, a symbol gesture that represents what the poor of Sicily were forced to do. When the feast is over, the remaining food and whatever money has been contributed are given to the poor.

    Whether a St. Joseph Altar is an elaborate display at an elegant church or a humble table in a modest home, it is a reflection of deep devotion to St. Joseph, the patron of those in need—workers, travelers, the persecuted, the poor, the aged, the dying. And it is a custom that has enjoyed resurgence in recent years, as young and old have begun to rediscover their heritage.

    After many centuries, the St. Joseph Altar still serves as a reminder that those who have enjoyed some measure of good fortune must share it with those who have less.

    http://www.catholicculture.org/culture/liturgicalyear/activities/view.cfm?id=1029

    Offline PerEvangelicaDicta

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    St Joseph Feast
    « Reply #3 on: March 19, 2014, 10:09:52 AM »
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  • In homage to the exalted dignity of our beloved Saint Joseph

    PRAYER TO SAINT JOSEPH BEFORE MASS    
    O BLESSED Joseph, happy man, to whom it was given not only to see and to hear that God Whom many kings longed to see, and saw not, to hear, and heard not; but also to carry Him in your arms, to embrace Him, to clothe Him, and guard and defend Him.
    V. Pray for us, O Blessed Joseph.            
    R. That we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ
    O GOD, Who has given us a royal priesthood, we beseech Thee, that as Blessed Joseph was found worthy to touch with his hands, and to bear in his arms, Thy only-begotten Son, born of the Virgin Mary, so may we be made fit, by cleanness of heart and blamelessness of life, to minister at Thy holy altar; may we, this day, with reverent devotion partake of the Sacred Body and Blood of Thy Only-begotten Son, and may we in the world to come be accounted worthy of receiving an ever-lasting reward. Through the same Christ our Lord. Amen.

    PRAYER TO SAINT JOSEPH AFTER MASS
    GUARDIAN of virgins and father, Saint Joseph, to whose faithful custody Innocence itself, Christ Jesus, and Mary, Virgin of virgins, was committed; I pray and beseech thee by each of these dear pledges, Jesus and Mary, that, being preserved from all uncleanness, I may with spotless mind, pure heart, and a chaste body, ever serve Jesus and Mary most chastely all the days of my life. Amen

    -------------------------------------
    Go to Joseph in thy joys, thou wilt rejoice the more.  
    Go to Joseph in thy grief, when death knocks at thy door.  
    Go to Joseph no matter when, thy refuge he  will be.  
    He holds the key to Jesus' Heart, Its treasures are for thee!

    Offline Neil Obstat

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    St Joseph Feast
    « Reply #4 on: March 19, 2014, 04:06:27 PM »
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  • .

    Today is the last day for this event in Los Angeles.  
    Sorry I'm posting this so late.  I was busy with St. Patrick's Day!  HAHAHAHA  :cowboy:


    Casa Italiana is the name of the parish hall between two parking lots adjacent to St. Peter's parish church, 1039 N. Broadway, L.A. (1/4 mile north of Chinatown).

    Casa Italiana is a lot more than a parish hall, however.  Over the years it has been remodeled and appointed with very impressive features.  A resident/parishioner is an artisan and carpenter who has owned a finish carpentry shop for many years (which he sold about 3 years ago).  His shop produced and installed, practically for free, all the ornate solid wood archways that decorate the hall, as you can see in these photos.  There is a stunning bas-relief portrait of Padre Pio in American Black Walnut inside the church, on the right wall in an alcove.  It is hand carved, about 1.75 scale, and has a very lifelike appearance.  The artist made this archway that frames the main stage in the hall, also of Black Walnut:



    The artist himself can be seen in this photo, on the stage, behind his workbench, which is supported by two sawhorses.  He is a master carver and sculptor, who has recently survived terminal cancer.


    source:
    http://golosangeles.about.com/b/2014/03/12/st-josephs-table-at-casa-italiana.htm



    To see the true Sicilian heart of LA, the place to be March 17-19 is Casa Italiana at St. Peter's Italian Church at the edge of Chinatown for the annual St. Joseph's Table. The Sicilian tradition of feeding the poor on St. Joseph's feast day has been extended to feeding the whole community with a pasta dinner. The event also includes daily mass, the Holy Family Procession and a St. Joseph's Table artfully decked out with edible masterpieces donated to raise money for the church's food program, which feeds over 200 homeless and migrants daily. The spaghetti dinner is free. Italian sausage, pizza and desserts are available for sale. Donations are accepted to support the program.

    When: March 17-19, 2014, 11 am mass daily, 12 noon procession and blessing, 12 to 8 pm dinner
    Where: St. Peter's Italian Church, 1039 North Broadway, Los Angeles, California 90012
    Cost: Free, donations accepted
    Parking: Church and street parking
    Info: www.stpeterschurchla.org, (323) 225-8119

    More:

        St. Joseph's Table Photo Gallery (24 pictures of these events)
        The History of St. Joseph's Tables




    At Casa Italiana, one of the main features is that Italian bakeries all over Los Angeles (200 sq.mi.) donate cakes for this St. Joseph's Table, decorated to honor St. Joseph and other saints dear to the Italians, such as San Triphone, Sta. Lucia, St. Peter, San Giovanni, St. Anthony (of Padua - who in Portugal is called "St. Anthony of Lisbon") and St. Padre Pio.  Here is a closeup of one cake depicting St. Anthony:



    The inscription says, "In Honor of St. Joseph, from Saint Anthony Society."



    A very important feature are the desserts, which include cannoli, spumoni ice cream pie, cookies and cupcakes.




    There are tables set up with produce for sale, at less than market prices, all of which is donated by local merchants for St. Joseph's Table, and the proceeds of which go to the food program at the parish.




    The hall has capacity to seat about 400 people, but with the St. Joseph's Table occupying about 1/3 of the floor area, they manage to seat about 250 - in very close quarters.  






    And don't forget the raffle!




    Another web page mentions other locations for St. Joseph's Table, including Mary Star of the Sea in San Pedro (pronounced "PEE-droe" by Italians and Yugoslavians in the area -- just to be different from Hispanics, who say "PAY-droh"), and the Armand Hammer Museum (oddly enough!).




    The image quality isn't very good, but the little objects like ladders, cross, hammer, pincers, are breads made in the shape of objects depicting the Crucifixion of Our Lord.   This was from 1998, 30 years after the Newmass was thrown at us from Rome, and such traditions still survived.  Today, however, only 15 years later, most of the breads depict non-religious themes, such as alligators, crocus flowers (the species from whence saffron comes) and swans.  The one shape that seems to endure so far is the cross - without other reminders of Our Lord's death, however.
     
    Here is a picture that shows bread baked in the shape of a bunch of grapes, and a kind of floral cross:





    Italian Catholic Federation -- an organization that has been in the L.A. area for about 100 years now, helps to organize and promote events like this for the benefit of American Italians and the community at large.

    Italian Catholic Federation
    c/o St. Francis Xavier Parish
    3801 Scott Road
    Burbank, CA 91504

    Another parish not mentioned on these pages is Our Lady of Perpetual Help in Santa Clarita, CA, on Lyons Blvd.  They have had a very nice St. Joseph's Table for many years, and a group of Italians with regular meetings.  The overtly Catholic character of these events, has, unfortunately declined over the years, to the point where now the conversation and outlook of people present is very reminiscent of a Lodge meeting.  I probably shouldn't say much more about this sad fact.  The point is, our traditions are the last thing to die out.  (The Newmass was forced upon us but we can still keep St. Joseph's Table going if we support it and encourage those who enjoy making it happen.) Keeping St. Joseph's Table alive and well helps to stave off the decline of faith, even if these events are a PRODUCT of the vibrant faith of our ancestors, nonetheless, continuing their practice helps us to keep in touch with their zeal and their hope for eternal salvation.  

    Ironically, St. Joseph's Day, occurring during Lent every year, is rather a kind of break from penance and fasting (along with St. Patrick's Day, of course!).  But we can still practice a penitential aspect to this feast day, by our almsgiving (for the poor) and by our helping our neighbor, and by going out of our way to do something for others in the name of St. Joseph.  

    Try to tell several people today, "Happy St. Joseph's Day!"  


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    Offline Neil Obstat

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    St Joseph Feast
    « Reply #5 on: March 19, 2014, 04:14:52 PM »
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    I met some Sicilians in a grocery market yesterday, quite by chance, and got talking to them about Italian traditions and culture, which they seemed to appreciate.  I mentioned St. Joseph's Table to them, and even though the father of the family was named "Giuseppe" they had nothing to say about St. Joseph, or the tradition of the St. Joseph's Table.  But they seemed to know what I was talking about.  

    Perhaps they were not Catholic, or, at least they were not in touch with the universal appeal of this Feast Day tradition.  They could have been shocked that a complete stranger was willing to mention Catholic traditions in public!  

    Viva Cristo Rey!  (That's not just a Mexican slogan.)

    There are a lot of Catholics who have never heard about St. Joseph's Table, but I find it noteworthy that some, as soon as they find out about it, pick up the ball and run with it, so as to start their own St. Joseph's Table tradition.  It's a very Catholic thing to do.  

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    Offline Neil Obstat

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    St Joseph Feast
    « Reply #6 on: March 19, 2014, 04:54:47 PM »
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  • .

    Quote

    At present there are two major feasts in his honor. On March 19 our veneration is directed to him personally and to his part in the work of redemption, while on May 1 we honor him as the patron of workmen throughout the world and as our guide in the difficult matter of establishing equitable norms regarding obligations and rights in the social order.



    The calendar date of May 1st is a very recent addition, instituted in 1955 by Pope Pius XII.  It's interesting that the Italian tradition of St. Joseph's Table has not been moved to May 1st.  I don't have any reason to explain this phenomenon.  Perhaps it's a kid of miracle, actually.  

    I found a pretty interesting description here:

    The feast of St. Joseph the Worker was established by Pope Pius XII in 1955 in order to Christianize the concept of labor and give to all workmen a model and a protector. By the daily labor in his shop, offered to God with patience and joy, St. Joseph provided for the necessities of his holy spouse and of the Incarnate Son of God, and thus became an example to all laborers. "Workmen and all those laboring in conditions of poverty will have reasons to rejoice rather than grieve, since they have in common with the Holy Family daily preoccupations and cares"(Leo XIII).


    St. Joseph the Worker


    "May Day" has long been dedicated to labor and the working man. It falls on the first day of the month that is dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary. Pope Pius XII expressed the hope that this feast would accentuate the dignity of labor and would bring a spiritual dimension to labor unions. It is eminently fitting that St. Joseph, a working man who became the foster-father of Christ and patron of the universal Church, should be honored on this day.


    St. Joseph the Worker


    The texts of the Mass and the Liturgy of the Hours provide a catechetical synthesis of the significance of human labor seen in the light of faith. The Opening Prayer states that God, the creator and ruler of the universe, has called men and women in every age to develop and use their talents for the good of others. The Office of Readings, taken from the document of the Second Vatican Council on the Church in the modern world, develops this idea. In every type of labor we are obeying the command of God given in Genesis 2:15 and repeated in the responsory for the Office of Readings. The responsory for the Canticle of Zechariah says that "St. Joseph faithfully practiced the carpenter's trade. He is a shining example for all workers." Then, in the second part of the Opening Prayer, we ask that we may do the work that God has asked of us and come to the rewards he has promised. In the Prayer after Communion we ask: "May our lives manifest your love; may we rejoice for ever in your peace."

    The liturgy for this feast vindicates the right to work, and this is a message that needs to be heard and heeded in our modern society. In many of the documents issued by Pope John XXIII, Pope Paul VI, the Second Vatican Council and Pope John Paul II, reference is made to the Christian spirit that should permeate one's work, after the example of St. Joseph. In addition to this, there is a special dignity and value to the work done in caring for the family. The Office of Readings contains an excerpt from the Vatican II document on the modern world: "Where men and women, in the course of gaining a livelihood for themselves and their families, offer appropriate service to society, they can be confident that their personal efforts promote the work of the Creator, confer benefits on their fellowmen, and help to realize God's plan in history" (no. 34).

    — Excerpted from Saints of the Roman Calendar by Enzo Lodi


    May 01, 2014
    (Readings on USCCB website)

    Collect: O God, Creator of all things, who laid down for the human race the law of work, graciously grant that by the example of Saint Joseph and under his patronage we may complete the works you set us to do and attain the rewards you promise. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.







    I find it noteworthy that this "May Day" Feast Day is right at the cusp of the liturgical revolution, inasmuch as it was begun in 1955, the first year of the movement that would develop into the Newmass.  Priests today who adhere to the Canonized Traditional Latin Mass without any influence from the Newchurch accretions and aggiornamento, draw the line at 1954, or they say, "pre-1955 missal."


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    Offline shin

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    St Joseph Feast
    « Reply #7 on: March 19, 2014, 06:52:21 PM »
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  • St. Joseph, like the Divine Jesus,
    carry me in your arms.

    The Archconfraternity prayer to St. Joseph for mornings and evenings:

    St. Joseph, model and patron of those who love the Sacred Heart of Jesus, pray for us!


    Ancient Prayer to St. Joseph

    O St. Joseph whose protection is so great, so strong, so prompt before the Throne of God, I place in you all my interests and desires. O St. Joseph do assist me by your powerful intercession and obtain for me from your Divine Son all spiritual blessings through Jesus Christ, Our Lord; so that having engaged here below your Heavenly power I may offer my thanksgiving and homage to the most Loving of Fathers. O St. Joseph, I never weary of contemplating you and Jesus asleep in your arms. I dare not approach you while He reposes near your heart. Press him in my name and kiss His fine Head for me, and ask Him to return the kiss when I draw my dying breath. St. Joseph, Patron of departing souls, pray for us.

    Sincerely,

    Shin

    'Flores apparuerunt in terra nostra. . . Fulcite me floribus.' (The flowers appear on the earth. . . stay me up with flowers. Sg 2:12,5)'-


    Offline poche

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    St Joseph Feast
    « Reply #8 on: March 20, 2014, 02:51:48 AM »
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  • Part of the celebration of St. Joseph's Table or Altar is the Holy Family knocking door-to-door for food and shelter before finding the Table. Here is the tradition.


    DIRECTIONS
    The custom of the Holy Family's search for food and shelter is an integral part of the St. Joseph's Altar celebration. Players are first selected to represent Jesus, Mary, Joseph and the angels. The ritual begins with St. Joseph knocking on three doors, looking for food and shelter for his family.

    At each of the first two closed doors they try, someone inside asks, "Who is there?"

    The response: "Jesus, Mary and Joseph."

    "What do you want?"

    "We seek food and shelter."

    The response comes: "There is no room for you here."

    When the Holy Family arrives at the third door, where the Altar is set, St. Joseph again knocks, and the dialog is repeated. But this time, when St. Joseph says, "We seek food and shelter," the joyful response is: "Welcome to this house. The table is set. The food is prepared. Come in and honor us with your presence."

    After going inside, the Saints are treated to a meal that traditionally includes a taste of each item on the Altar. Each of the Saints is accompanied by a family member, who serves his food. The atmosphere during the meal is quiet and reverent, and visitors must wait until the Saints have eaten before viewing the Altar.

    After the Saints have finished their meal, each guest is welcomed and served with love and warm hospitality in imitation of St. Joseph

    http://www.catholicculture.org/culture/liturgicalyear/activities/view.cfm?id=1031

    Offline Neil Obstat

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    St Joseph Feast
    « Reply #9 on: March 20, 2014, 03:53:53 AM »
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    That's a cute story about the door-knocking and saints eating their meal and stuff, but it's not what I've seen at St. Joseph's Table practices.  Maybe I haven't been watching closely enough.  Even so, it seems to me that perhaps someone is getting confused with Las Posadas, which is a traditional and/or popular practice held during ADVENT (in Mexico, for example, then taken elsewhere), while this is during LENT (in Sicily, for example, then taken elsewhere).  Now, Advent and Lent both have a penitential aspect, but they are not the same season, nor is Las Posadas the same practice as St. Joseph's Table.  They both involve the needs of and the care for The Holy Family, but that's about all there is to their similarity.


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    Offline Cantarella

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    St Joseph Feast
    « Reply #10 on: March 21, 2014, 12:21:12 AM »
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    If anyone says that true and natural water is not necessary for baptism and thus twists into some metaphor the words of our Lord Jesus Christ" Unless a man be born again of water and the Holy Spirit" (Jn 3:5) let him be anathema.


    Offline poche

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    St Joseph Feast
    « Reply #11 on: March 21, 2014, 04:52:52 AM »
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  • Recording the "memories" of Jesus' life with His friends and family is a wonderful way to gain more knowledge of Christ and enter more closely into the Paschal Mystery. Mrs. Miller suggests making an ongoing scrapbook project that can be started anytime of the year, and can be done individually or as a group project for all ages.


    DIRECTIONS
    "The Church thus confesses that Jesus is inseparably true God and true man. He is truly the Son of God who, without ceasing to be God and Lord, became a man and our brother" (CCC, 469).

    Many people want to deny the actual historical existence of Jesus Christ. It helps to see Jesus as our brother and as man, with friends and family just like everyone else. With the popularity of scrapbooking, why not make a scrapbook album of Family and Friends of Jesus? This album would contain memories of His friends and special events of His life. One can pretend that the album will be given as a present to Jesus.

    The album would include saints that knew Christ personally (like the Apostles, St. Martha, Mary Magdalen), or were part of His family (Mary, Joseph, Sts. Joachim and Ann, St. Elizabeth, St. John the Baptist), or who wrote about His life in the Gospels (Luke and Mark). St. Paul is also included on the list as the Church considers him an Apostle. The scrapbook can also contain "memories" of special feast days related to the life of Mary and Jesus (Annunciation, Presentation, Christmas, Birth of Mary, etc.). The feast days are similar to family events that one records with pictures and memories in albums (Christmas, birthdays, baptisms, etc.).

    By learning more about these saints who knew Jesus in person helps us gain more knowledge of Christ. By celebrating these feasts, we are brought to the Paschal mysteries (Christ's passion, death, resurrection and ascension), which are the center and priority of the celebration of the Liturgical Year.

    A list of suggested saints and feast days have been provided, along with the Bible citations of the Mass readings. Included is the rank of the feast, and the liturgical color. The feasts of the Guardian Angels and the Archangels Michael, Gabriel and Raphael are included, as they are part of the "family" – St. Gabriel appeared to Mary at the Annunciation, and all of us, including all these saints had Guardian Angels. This list is by no way complete. Some days could be added, such as Holy Thursday, Good Friday, Immaculate Conception, Chair of St. Peter, Conversion of St. Paul, or removed as desired.

    This is an ongoing project, and ideal for all ages. The amount of work, caliber of supplies and what type of information you use depends on your time, talent and age level. It can be used to develop art skills, copywork practice, calligraphy practice, and other applied skills. Scrapbooks and photo albums can be found almost anywhere, ranging from inexpensive to elaborate and archival quality. Find something suitable both in price range, durability and flexibility. At minimum, it should have the capability to add and/or subtract pages and to move them around. If you intend on using just magazine cutouts and inexpensive pictures, it's not important to use acid free paper. But if you want to keep this from year to year, definitely refrain from using construction paper and newspaper.

    Decide initially what purpose the album will have. Will it just contain pictures, either hand-drawn, or cut from magazines, printed from the computer or actual holycards or reproductions of famous artwork? Will it include symbols of the saints and feast days? Will it be a reference for the family, including biblical quotes, prayers, novenas, meditations, activities and recipes? Will it contain photographs of various projects and celebrations of your family on these days? Or perhaps a combination? This could be a family project, with each member contributing, or it could be an individual project, that helps with spiritual growth. The best plan is to start simply and then add on every year. Use the calendar on CatholicCulture.org for each feast day to find information on the feast, biographies, patrons, symbols, prayers, recipes and other ideas.

    This project can be started during any part of the year. Since in the summer there is usually a lull in outside commitments and the Church's season is Ordinary Time, this is a good time to start this project. In July alone there are five saints' days that directly relate to the life of Christ.



    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Index Page For the Index page, have a picture of Jesus or His Sacred Heart in the center of the page. Surround the heart with one symbol of each saint or feast that is included in the album. The names of the saints and the page numbers could be included underneath the symbol.
    Scrapbook Pages St. Martha, July 29, is the example page presented, but remember that this is only a suggestion; use the ideas as a springboard for the scrapbook.

    Read the Gospel texts related to St. Martha: John 11: 1045; John 12: 1-9; Luke 10: 38-42. The Office of Readings has a sermon from St. Augustine, Sermo 103, 1-2. 6: PL 38, 613, 615. Discuss (or if this is an individual project, meditate on) the texts. Ask questions such as: What kind of friendship did Jesus have with Martha, Mary and Lazarus? What lessons did Jesus teach Martha during these events? What virtues or lesson do we learn to emulate?

    Find other commentaries, such as the Navarre Bible to see the explanation of these readings.

    From St. Martha one basic lesson learned is that there is both active and contemplative work. Some vocations require more of one, but we all need to stop and experience quiet to pray, meditate, contemplate. Parents' time allotted for prayer is shorter than unmarried singles or religious, but time should be set aside. Children need to learn to start putting time aside for personal prayer and spiritual reading. This will help to develop good life-long prayer habits.

    Another lesson to learn is that we serve Christ our Brother when we serve others through our work, whether it be the daily duty of household chores or other charitable work outside the home. In serving others we serve our Brother Christ.

    After discussing or meditating on these lessons, it is time to put the scrapbook page together. Start with a page with a white background. Use borders or decorations with a kitchen, cooking or food theme.

    Title St. Martha, July 29
    Pictures or drawings or holycards of St. Martha. Sources can be from the Internet, magazines, or reproductions from sacred art. Or have child recreate the scenes with Jesus in drawing or crayons or paint. Perhaps the picture could be Mary meeting Jesus at the door, and Martha in the kitchen, wearing an apron.

    Symbols: Water pot and asperge; cooking utensils; ladle or skimmer; broom; bunk of keys at her girdle; two asperges; dragon bound with a girdle (symbolizing temptation resisted); torch (symbolizing enlightenment and zeal); censer (symbolizing prayer and worship); boat.

    Patronage: Cooks; housewives; maids; servants; servers; single laywomen; travellers.

    Quotes along page: (Print out from the computer, write in calligraphy or with fancy markers) "Martha, Martha, you are anxious and worried about many things. There is need of only one thing. Mary has chosen the better part and it will not be taken from her." (Lk 10: 41-42).

    "Jesus loved Martha and Mary and their brother Lazarus" (Antiphon, Canticle of Mary)

    "Yes, Lord. I have come to believe that you are the Messiah, the Son of God, the one who is coming into the world" (Jn 11:27)

    Foods: Ratatouille; foods that Jesus would have eaten that Martha prepared.

    Geography notes, customs of New Testament times.

    Prayer: Father, your Son honored St. Martha by coming to her home as a guest. By her prayers may we serve Christ in our brothers and sisters and be welcomed by you into heaven, our true home. We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, forever and ever. Amen This prayer is from the Collect (Opening Prayer) of Mass; the same prayer is used as the Closing Prayer for Morning and Evening Prayer in the Liturgy of the Hours.

    Other illustrations: people serving others; people cooking, serving food, pictures of Lazarus rising from dead; pictures or map of Bethany, during the time of Christ; type of house that Martha would have resided, etc.

    http://www.catholicculture.org/culture/liturgicalyear/activities/view.cfm?id=1131

    Offline poche

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    St Joseph Feast
    « Reply #12 on: March 26, 2014, 03:54:50 AM »
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  • The fava bean plays a role on the feast of St. Joseph and the tradition of the Altar or Table for March 19. Here is a short explanation.


    DIRECTIONS
    Fava bean (vicia fava) —Fava beans play a large role in the Sicilian tradition of the St. Joseph Table or St. Joseph Altar. They may be served in a frittata or in garlic sauce. When dried, roasted and blessed, it becomes the very popular "lucky bean." Legend has it that you will never be broke as long as you carry one. Some people believe that if you keep one in the pantry, there will always be food in the kitchen.

    The myth of the fava bean began during the famine in Sicily, where the bean was used as fodder for cattle. To survive, the farmers prepared them for the table. Hence, they considered themselves lucky to have them. The bean is also a symbol of fertility since it grows well even in poor, rocky soil. Italians would carry a bean from a good crop to ensure a good crop the following year.

    The blessed dried beans are distributed on the altars along with a piece of blessed bread.

    http://www.catholicculture.org/culture/liturgicalyear/activities/view.cfm?id=1027

    Offline poche

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    St Joseph Feast
    « Reply #13 on: March 27, 2014, 02:49:48 AM »
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  • St Joseph's Oil

    The tradition of anointing with sacred oil is very old indeed. It is used in sacraments and also, in some places, as a devotional practice. Brother André used to invite some of the sick people who came to him to apply oil on the part of their body they wanted healed but, as they did so, he always told people to pray to Saint Joseph. He always insisted on the fact that the oil itself did not have any miraculous power. He would remind people that it is God who has the power to heal. He underlined the fact that prayer and a gesture of faith, like applying oil, are important ways for us to express our faith in God's power.

    As it has been done since Brother André's time, the oil is placed in front of the statue of Saint-Joseph and burns for sometime before it is bottled and offered to pilgrims. The Oratory invites people to use this oil as a symbol of faith and, at the same time, to pray for the grace they solicit. There is no special prayer to be used. Each one can pray in his own way or use a prayer he or she likes.

    The Fr. Claude Grou, c.s.c of the Oratory says that they receive many letters from people who say that they have been cured after using the oil and praying to Brother André and Saint Joseph.

    The oil may be obtained from the Oratory:


    Saint-Joseph's Oratory 3800, Chemin Queen Mary Montreal (Quebec) Canada H3V 1H6
    Telephone: (514) 733-8211 Free phone number: 1-877-672-8647 Fax: (514) 733-9735

    For informations or any other questions fatherweb@saint-joseph.org

    http://www.catholicculture.org/culture/liturgicalyear/activities/view.cfm?id=1006

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    St Joseph Feast
    « Reply #14 on: March 28, 2014, 03:40:22 AM »
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  • Since the 16th century Catholic piety has assigned entire months to special devotions. Due to the solemnity of Saint Joseph on March 19, this month is devoted to this great saint, the foster father of Christ. "It greatly behooves Christians, while honoring the Virgin Mother of God, constantly to invoke with deep piety and confidence her most chaste spouse, Saint Joseph. We have a well grounded conviction that such is the special desire of the Blessed Virgin herself." --Pope Leo XIII


    Prayer:

    FOR OUR WORK Glorious Saint Joseph, pattern of all who are devoted to toil, obtain for me the grace to toil in the spirit of penance, in order thereby to atone for my many sins; to toil conscientiously, putting devotion to duty before my own inclinations; to labor with thankfulness and joy, deeming it an honor to employ and to develop, by my labor, the gifts I have received from Almighty God; to work with order, peace, moderation, and patience, without ever shrinking from weariness and difficulties; to work above all with a pure intention and with detachment from self, having always before my eyes the hour of death and the accounting which I must then render of time ill-spent, of talents unemployed, of good undone, and of my empty pride in success, which is so fatal to the work of God. All for Jesus, all through Mary, all in imitation of thee, 0 Patriarch Joseph! This shall be my motto in life and in death. Amen.

    OFFERING TO SAINT JOSEPH O great Saint Joseph, thou generous depositary and dispenser of immortal riches, behold us prostrate at thy feet, imploring thee to receive us as thy servants and as thy children. Next to the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary, of which thou art the faithful copy, we acknowledge that there is no heart more tender, more compassionate than thine.

    What, then, have we to fear, or, rather, for what should we not hope, if thou dost deign to be our benefactor, our master, our model, our father and our mediator? Refuse not, then, this favor, O powerful protector! We ask it of thee by the love thou hast for Jesus and Mary. Into thy hands we commit our souls and bodies, but above all the last moments of our lives.

    May we, after having honored, imitated, and served thee on earth, eternally sing with thee the mercies of Jesus and Mary. Amen.

    FOR THE INTERCESSION OF SAINT JOSEPH O Joseph, virgin-father of Jesus, most pure spouse of the Virgin Mary, pray every day for us to the same Jesus, the Son of God, that we, being defended by the power of His grace and striving dutifully in life, may be crowned by Him at the hour of death.

    http://www.catholicculture.org/culture/liturgicalyear/prayers/view.cfm?id=755


     

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