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Offline Matthew

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St. John the Baptist hymn - where Do Re Mi comes from
« on: June 24, 2012, 02:34:03 PM »
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  • The Vespers hymn for the Feast of St. John the Baptist (June 24):

    http://www.chantcd.com/lyrics/ut_queant_laxis.htm

    1. Ut queant laxis resonare fibris
    Mira gestorum famuli tuorum,
    Solve polluti labii reatum,
    Sancte Joannes.

    2. Nuntius celso veniens Olympo,
    Te patri magnum fore nasciturum,
    Nomen, et vitae seriem gerendae
    Ordine promit.

    3. Ille promissi dubius superni,
    Perdidit promptae modulos loquelae:
    Sed reformasti genitus peremptae
    Organa vocis.

    4. Ventris obstruso recubans cubili
    Senseras Regem thalamo manentem:
    Hinc parens nati meritis uterque
    Abdita pandit.

    5. Sit decus Patri, genitaeque Proli,
    Et tibi compar utriusque virtus,
    Spiritus semper, Deus unus, omni
    Temporis aevo. Amen.


    Initially written by Paolo Diacono as a hymn to Saint John the Baptist (circa 720 - 799), the Latin words "Ut queant laxis, Resonare fibris, Mira gestorum, Famuli tuorum, Solve polluti, Labii reatum," translate to "So that Your servants may sing at the top of their voices the wonders of Your acts, and absolve the fault from their stained lips."

    1. UT - queant laxis
    2. RE - sonare fibris
    3. MI - ra gestorum
    4. FA - muli tuorum
    5. SOL - ve polluti
    6. LA - bii reatum

    Using the syllables ut, re, mi, fa, sol, and la as names for the six tones, C to A, an Italian monk named Guido d'Arezzo (990-1050) created the system of Solmization, a system of using syllables, especially sol-fa like syllables, to represent the tones of the scale (known as the Guido System). Later in history 'Ut' was replaced by the more easily singable 'Do,' and another syllable, si or ti, was added at the end, giving the scale of seven syllables called do-re-mi-fa-sol-la-ti, which forms the present basic system of singing names for the tones of the scale. The syllable sol was later shortened to 'So,' making all of the syllables uniform in spelling and all ending with a vowel. This allowed for ease of remembering for faster learning and making it easy to do 'sight singing', or being able to instantly sing new music in tune from reproduced standardized sheet music.
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    Offline roscoe

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    St. John the Baptist hymn - where Do Re Mi comes from
    « Reply #1 on: June 26, 2012, 12:40:19 AM »
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  • In addition to the naming and voicing of the tones, it is their actual frequencies that are determined by the monk-- with the exception of the last note. Not him alone however as musicologists( Catholic & otherwise) had been researching the scale for over 1000 yrs at the time.

    There Is No Such Thing As 'Sede Vacantism'...
    nor is there such thing as a 'Feeneyite' or 'Feeneyism'


    Offline Neil Obstat

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    St. John the Baptist hymn - where Do Re Mi comes from
    « Reply #2 on: July 02, 2012, 07:13:22 PM »
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  • The foundation of Western music is indisputably our patrimony of Gregorian Chant.
    Sol-fa singing is based on the 4 ledger lined staff of Chant, and the various modes
    of the scales provide the basis for our modern scales.

    We have now 5 lines in the staff, and piano and organ music have two staves,
    treble and bass, but all this grew out of the ancient Chant literature.

    There is a less common tenor clef that some instruments use.

    A lot of misunderstanding exists among musicians who only use one clef or
    another. I knew a violinist who thought that there were no invisible lines
    between the treble and the bass clef (there is one, the line for middle C). He
    never used the bass clef, so how would he know about it? And his wife was an
    accompanist, playing piano.

    I had heard that sol-fa tones came from some Latin verses, but I had not seen
    them, actually. This first post answers my question, finally. Thanks, Matthew!
    .--. .-.-.- ... .-.-.- ..-. --- .-. - .... . -.- .. -. --. -.. --- -- --..-- - .... . .--. --- .-- . .-. .- -. -.. -....- -....- .--- ..- ... - -.- .. -.. -.. .. -. --. .-.-.

    Offline Elizabeth

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    St. John the Baptist hymn - where Do Re Mi comes from
    « Reply #3 on: July 04, 2012, 11:07:37 AM »
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  • Very nice thread.

    Offline roscoe

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    St. John the Baptist hymn - where Do Re Mi comes from
    « Reply #4 on: July 04, 2012, 12:10:15 PM »
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  • If there is anyone in the Forum that would like to have some Real Fun, go to Amazon MP3's and download Thelonious by Thelonious Monk( the album is Underground) & I Didn't Know What Time by McCoy Tyner( the album is Just Feelin). This will cost a grand total of $1:98.
    There Is No Such Thing As 'Sede Vacantism'...
    nor is there such thing as a 'Feeneyite' or 'Feeneyism'


     

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