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Offline Hobbledehoy

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Miscellany of Liturgical Treasures
« on: April 24, 2011, 10:48:55 PM »
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  • Merry Paschaltide everyone!

    Here's a treat for you on this very sacred and joyous Paschaltide.

    Throughout the Paschal Triduum at Vespers the Calced Carmelites have a peculiar form of Vespers.

    After the Pater and Ave, the Office commences immediately with the ninefold Kyrie, the Deus in adjutorium, &c., being ommited. The Dominical Psalms are said with the fourfold Alleluia as the single Antiphon. Afterwards, a series of versicles that very much resemble a Gradual follow and then the beautiful text of the Sequence (though here it is called a "Prosa") Victimæ paschali laudes follows, after which the Magnificant and its Antiphon are chanted and the Collect is prayed. The double Alleluia accompanies the concluding Benedicamus Domino.

    After the Paschal Triduum, the ninefold Kyrie is dropped and the Deus in adjutorium, &c., is taken up again. The rest of the Office remains the same throughout the Paschal Octave.

    As Archdale A. King holds (Liturgies of the Religious Orders, p. 230; Milwaukee, WI: The Bruce Publishing Company, 1955), this structure of the Office is derived from the solemn Procession to the Baptistery at Paschal Vespers. You can read more on the attached pages if you are interested...

    The scan of the Office of today's Vespers is from the Breviarium Ordinis Fratrum Beatissimæ Virginis Mariæ de Monte Carmelo juxta Hierosolymitanæ Ecclesiæ antiquam consuetudinem; Apostolica autoritate approbatum; Reverendissimi Patris Hilarii Mariæ Doswald totius Ordinis Prioris Generalis jussu editum. [The Breviary of the Friars of the Order of the Most Blessed Virgin Mary of Mount Carmel according to the Ancient Custom of the Church of Jerusalem; Approved by Apostolic Authority; Published by Order of the Most Reverend Father Hilary Mary Oswald, Prior-General of the Entire Order]. Rome, Tournai, Paris: Desclée & Socii, 1938.

    Hopefully I can post more litugical rarities soon. I will henceforth avail myself of this thread so as not to multiply threads unnecessarily on this sub-forum.
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    Offline Hobbledehoy

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    Miscellany of Liturgical Treasures
    « Reply #1 on: April 25, 2011, 12:06:32 PM »
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  • According to the rubrics of the Bridgettine Breviary, at the Hours, the following beautiful Collect is said, which I cannot find elsewhere:

    Quote
    O Almighty God, especially amidst these Paschal solemnities of Thy Son may the commemoration of Mary the Virgin Mother of God be ever healthful unto us, who did stand wounded by charity [as He was] hanging upon the Cross, and who now doth stand as Queen reigning in heaven at the right hand of the same our Lord Jesus Christ, Thy Son, who together with Thee doth live and reign in the unity of the Holy Ghost, God. Throughout all ages of ages. R. Amen.


    This Collect hearkens to the special place that Our Blessed Lady has in the Paschal mysteries that we are celebrating. As Idelfonso Cardinal Schuster observes in his commentary upon yesterday's Mass (The Sacramentary [Liber Sacramentorum]: Historical and Liturgical Notes on the Roman Missal, Vol. 2 , p. 313; trans. Arthur Levelis-Marke and W. Fairfax-Cholmeley; New York: Benziger Brothers, 1930):

    Quote
    After the paschal vigil at the Lateran the first basilica to be visited is that of the Mother of God on the Esquiline [Basilica Papale di Santa Maria Maggiore], for it is fitting that to her, before any other, the joys of the resurrection should be announced, to her who more intimately than any other shared in the passion of Jesus.


    One may see how decorously and worthily associated is Our Lady with the Sacrament of Baptism, a mystery that is a secondary central theme throughout the Paschaltide Office and Mass, in light of the teachings of St. Louis Marie regarding the True Devotion to the Blessed Virgin as indispensably entailing a more perfect and selfless renovation of the Baptismal vows, and in light of the teachings of the Church regarding Our Lady as Co-Redemptress and Mediatress of all graces merited by the Passion of her Divine Son.

    Therefore, the whole of Christendom in these sacred days cries forth unto the Mother of God: "Regina cæli, lætare, alleluja!"
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    Offline Hobbledehoy

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    « Reply #2 on: May 10, 2011, 08:36:20 PM »
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  • The Antiphon Media vita has always been one of my favorite antiphons.

    Rev. Father Garrigou-Lagrange (The Three Ages of the Interior Life: Prelude of Eternal Life, trans. Sr. M. Timothea Doyle, O.P.; St. Louis, MO: B. Herder Book Co., 1947) relates how the Angelic Doctor “could not keep back his tears when during Compline of Lent, he chanted the antiphon: ‘In the midst of life we are in death: whom do we seek as our helper, but Thou, O Lord, who because of our sins art rightly incensed? Holy God, holy strong God, holy and merciful Savior, deliver us not up to a bitter death; abandon us not in the time of our old age, when our strength will abandon us.’ (op. cit., ch. xxxiv. “Liturgical Prayer,” p. 441).

    The Dominicans chant this Antiphon at Lent in the second Quadragesimal fortnight, before Passiontide: to wit, daily at the Canticle Nunc dimittis from the Saturday before the Third Sunday in Lent to the Saturday before Passion Sunday exclusive. The Premonstratensians follow the same custom as well as the Carmelites of the ancient observance, who at the triple Sancte (which hearkens to the ancient trisagion) make a genuflection.

    “This beautiful antiphon,” Rev. Father Reginald continues (ibid.), “begs for the grace of final perseverance, the grace of graces, that of the predestined. How it should speak to the heart of the contemplative theologian, who has made a deep study of the tracts on Providence, predestination, and grace!”

    Attached is the text and chant for this Antiphon as found in the Premonstratensian Processional, and it is a bit different from the Dominican and Carmelite versions, and the versicles are not said with the Antiphon in the Premonstratensian Breviary.

    Here’s a loose translation of the text attached:

    Quote
    In the midst of life we are in death. Whom are we to seek as helper if not Thee, O Lord, Who art justly outraged on account of our sins? * Holy God, Holy Mighty One, Holy and merciful Savior, deliver us not unto bitter death. V. In Thee have our fathers hoped; they hoped, and Thou didst liberate them. * Holy God, Holy Mighty One, Holy and merciful Savior, deliver us not unto bitter death. V. Unto Thee did our fathers cry forth; they cried forth, and were not confounded. * Holy God, Holy Mighty One, Holy and merciful Savior, deliver us not unto bitter death. V. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost. V. * Holy God, Holy Mighty One, Holy and merciful Savior, deliver us not unto bitter death.



    Source:

    Processionale ad usum Sacri et Canonici Ordinis Præmonstratensis jussu Illustrissimi in Christo Patris ac DD. Gummari Crets Ecclesiæ Averbodiensis Abbatis et totius Ordinis Præmonstratensis Generalis sua fungentis et Capituli Generalis auctoritate. [The Processional according to the Use of the Sacred and Canonical Premonstratensian Order, by Order of the Most Illustrious Father in Christ and Doctor of Sacred Theology Gummarus Crets, Abbot of the Church of Averbode and General of the whole Premonstratensian Order, by Authority of his Office and that of the General Chapter]. Rome, Tournai, Paris: Desclée & Socii, 1932.
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    Offline Hobbledehoy

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    « Reply #3 on: May 10, 2011, 09:03:39 PM »
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  • The Antiphon Media vita has a sort of relevance to Paschaltide in that at the Hymns throughout the Paschal season (in the Dominican, Calced Carmelite, Premonstratensian and Benedictine Breviaries) at Matins, Lauds and Vespers the following stanza occurs:

    Quæsumus, Auctor omnium,
    In hoc Paschali gaudio,
    Ab omni mortis impetu
    Tuum defende populum.


    This Rev. Fr. Aquinas Byrnes (Hymns of the Dominican Missal and Breviary, pp. 106-107n; St. Louis, MO: B. Herder Book Co., 1943) translates and explains:

    Quote
    "Author of all things, we pray, that in this Paschal joy: defend Thy people from every assault of death." This and the following stanza make up the double doxology in Paschaltide. Gaudio. The joy of Easter is the Resurrection and all it implies. "If Christ be not risen again, your faith is vain, for you are yet in your sins" (I Cor. 15:17). Impetu, every attack of "the world, the flesh and the devil" which might bring spiritual death (mortis) to the soul. "With His holy arm He will defend them" (Wisd. 5:17).


    Note: In the Roman Breviary, the text of this stanza was change during the reforms of Pope Urban VIII. It presently reads:

    Quote
    Ut sis perenne mentibus
    Paschale Jesu gaudium;
    A morte dira criminum
    Vitæ renatos libera.


    Loose translation: "That thou, O Jesus, mayest ever be unto souls Eastertide joy, do Thou liberate from the dire death of crimes those reborn unto life."
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    Offline Hobbledehoy

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    « Reply #4 on: May 11, 2011, 12:00:33 AM »
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  • The Perpetual Adoration Benedictines in Germany and Holland have a very beautiful and moving Votive Office of Reparation of the Injuries Offered unto the Most Holy Sacrament (Officium Votivum Reparationis Injuriarum Sanctissimo Sacramento Illatarum), which is given a special rank of Privileged Simple and is begun with Wednesday Vespers and ends with Thursday Compline. There is a proper Lesson for each month taken from the Sermons of the Fathers (except for May, by reason of the Paschaltide Season).

    The following is a translation of the Collect, the Latin text of which is attached.

    Quote
    O Lord Jesus, do Thou graciously behold those coming with confidence unto the throne of Thy grace: and lend ear; that Thy glory, which in the Sacrament of Thy love doth suffer the perpetual contumelies of the impious, may also be repaired by the worship of those who serve Thee: Who dost live and reign with God the Father in the unity of the Holy Ghost, God, throughout all ages of ages. R. Amen.

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    Offline Hobbledehoy

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    « Reply #5 on: May 11, 2011, 01:16:22 AM »
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  • It is to be noted in the midst of these Paschal joys that St. Mary Magdalene was the first recorded witness of the Resurrection of the Savior. She attained to this great grace by persevering in prayerful and selfless penance and charity at the foot of the Cross, under the tutelage and mediation of the Blessed Virgin Mary, with whom she valiantly stood on that first Good Friday together with the beloved Apostle and Evangelist St. John and the other holy women.

    The faithful of times past did not overlook the admirable design of Providence that decreed that the great Immaculate Virgin, Mother of the Word Incarnate, and the great Penitent of the Gospels should share the same name. Hence, in the Dominican Breviary we find the following Responsory:

    Quote
    R. Let us praise the work of God in Mary, Mother and Virgin, but also in Mary, sinner but penitent: * This Mary is given as a mirror of innocency, whilst this Mary is given as an example of penitence. V. That we may confess to Thy holy Name, and may glory in Thy praise, * That Mary is given as a mirror of innocency, whilst this Mary is given as an example of penitence. (v. Responsory, Brev. O. Præd.)


    The conversion of the holy Magdalene is depicted in a curious and dramatic manner in the Premonstratensian Breviary (22 July):

    Quote
    R. The Leviathan’s jaw hath been pierced through as a ring, through whose aperture thou hast been drawn away, O Mary: do thou therefore help us, that, having fallen therein in sinning, we may merit to be drawn away from thence in imitating thee * Repenting. V. May the Divine Mercy, with thee interceding for us, may not only forbid us to go into the Leviathan’s mouth, but also may grant us to return from its mouth * Repenting. (ix. Responsory, Brev. O. Præm.)


    The holy Magdalene's conversion is here vividly depicted as a rescue from the belly of the monstrous Leviathan, an allusion to the following passage of Holy Writ: "Canst thou draw out the Leviathan with a hook, and with a rope shalt thou tie his tongue? Shalt thou put a ring in his nostrils, or bore through his jaw with a buckle?" (Job ch. xl. 20, 21). Rev. Father Gregory Martin, in a marginal note to this passage in the Douay Old Testament, explains that the Leviathan is a “huge great fish, perhaps the whale, exceeding man’s power to be managed, yet it is subject, as also the devil signified thereby, to God’s power and providence.” In the Prophecy of Isaias, the Incarnate Word is foreshown as a mighty Conqueror who shall slay the monster: "In that day our Lord will visit with His sore, and great, and strong sword upon Leviathan and the serpent, the bar, and upon Leviathan the crooked serpent, and shall kill the whale that is in the sea" (ch. xxvii. 1).

    Thus, in the Premonstratensian Responsory cited above, St. Mary Magdalene is represented as having been rescued from the wounded Leviathan, that is to say, from the devil overcome by Christ, the Divine Victor risen gloriously from the dead. The Responsory also reminds us that we are ever in danger of being devoured by the monster on account of fallen nature, but if we imitate the holy Magdalene's penitence and charity, we too may be freed from the Leviathan, "who as a roaring lion goeth about, seeking whom he may devour" (I S. Peter ch. v. 8). But this is a gratuitous gift of God's infinite clemency, and it behooves us to seek such a grace by prayer, particularly in imploring the holy Penitent's intercession.

    The infernal Leviathan can only swallow us up if we surrender ourselves to it, in the horrible magnitude of our malice and turpitude. Yet we too, if we should ever have the misfortune to lose Our Lord by our unhappy fault, can find Him yet again by penance and charity in this life, and by final perseverance we can find Him once more in that perpetual and unspeakable vision that constitutes the eternal bliss of the Angels and the elect. Hence the beautiful collect to be found in the Dominican and Norbertine Breviaries for St. Mary Magdalene's Office:

    Quote
    Grant unto us, O most clement Father, that as blessed Mary Magdalene in loving our Lord Jesus Christ above all things hath obtained the forgiveness of all her sins, so also before Thy mercy may she beseech for us everlasting beatitude. Through the same Christ our Lord. Amen.


    As Paschaltide continues its course, let us not forget to utter a prayer to the great Penitent who merited the grace of beholding the Risen Lord before the other disciples and before the Apostles themselves. Whilst they doubted and fled in the Garden, and all but one stood by the Cross, never did she abandon her beloved Jesus. Like the Blessed Virgin and St. Joseph seeking anxiously and joyously finding the lost Infant at Jerusalem, she too sought Our Lord on that sacred Easter morning and found Him to her great joy.
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    Offline Hobbledehoy

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    « Reply #6 on: May 13, 2011, 08:42:56 PM »
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  • Here's a treat for the other bookworms here at CathInfo.

    In the Rite for the Blessing of a new Monastery in the Rituale Monasticum, Cap. XIV. Art. xvii. num. 397 (Collegeville, MN: Typis Abbatiæ Sancti Joannis Baptistæ, 1942), there is a distinct blessing for a library or a scriptorium.

    Psalm cxxx having been recited or chanted, with the Antiphon Domine, non est exaltatum cor meum: neque elati sunt oculi mei (“Lord my heart is not exalted: neither are mine eyes lofty,” ibid. 1), the following is said:

    V. Beatus homo, quem tu erudieris, Domine (Blessed is the man whom Thou shalt instruct, O Lord).
    ℟. Et de lege tua docueris eum (And shalt teach out of Thy law, Ps. xciii. 12).
    V. Dominus vobiscum.
    ℟. Et cum spiritu tuo.

    Pro Bibliotheca

    Descendat, Domine, virtus Spiritus Sancti tui super hos libros, qui eos mundando purificet et benedicat atque sanctificet et omnium clementer corda illuminet et verum intellectum tribuat; sed et illuminata tua præcepta conservare et implere secundum tuam voluntatem bonis operibus implendo concedat. Per Christum, Dominum nostrum.
    ℟. Amen.


    May the virtue of Thy Holy Ghost, O Lord, descend upon these books, which, cleansing them, may mercifully purify and bless and sanctify and illumine the hearts of all and may it grant [them] true intelligence; and also, being [thus] illumined, may it give [them] to keep and fulfill Thy precepts according to Thy will in the fulfillment of good works. Through Christ, Our Lord.
    ℟. Amen.


    Pro Scriptorio

    Benedicere digneris, Domine, hoc scriptorium famulorum tuorum et omnes habitantes in eo: ut, quidquid hic divinarum scripturarum ab eis lectum vel scriptum fuerit, sensu capiant et opera perficiant. Per Christum, Dominum nostrum.
    ℟. Amen.


    Do thou vouchsafe, O Lord, to bless this scriptorium of Thy servants and all who abide therein: so that they may comprehend in understanding and perform in works whatsoever shall be read or written by them of the divine scriptures. Through Christ, Our Lord.
    ℟. Amen.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Note how fitting Ps. cxxx is for this blessing. It speaks of a profound humility, sincere self-knowledge and childlike docility to the Holy Ghost which are requisite for real progress in the science of the Saints, and in the efficacious study of the branches of knowledge associated with this holy science. Note also how the Collects stress the necessity of the performance of good works in order to become worthy of the grace and benediction of God.
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    Offline Jitpring

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    « Reply #7 on: May 13, 2011, 10:12:24 PM »
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  • Good work and thanks, sir. Good work and thanks.
    Age, thou art shamed.*
    O shame, where is thy blush?**

    -Shakespeare, Julius Caesar,* Hamlet**


    Offline herbert

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    « Reply #8 on: May 14, 2011, 01:18:05 AM »
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  • Quote from: Jitpring
    Good work and thanks, sir. Good work and thanks.


    jitpring you just repeated yurself

    Offline herbert

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    « Reply #9 on: May 14, 2011, 01:19:51 AM »
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  • intersting posts hobbledehoy!

    Offline Hobbledehoy

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    « Reply #10 on: May 14, 2011, 04:36:23 PM »
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  • Thank you Jitpring and Herbert for the kind remarks.
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    Offline Pyrrhos

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    « Reply #11 on: May 28, 2011, 08:10:39 AM »
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  • Thank you very much, one is more beautiful than the other. Always looking for more liturgical treasures.
    If you are a theologian, you truly pray, and if you truly pray, you are a theologian. - Evagrius Ponticus

    Offline Sigismund

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    « Reply #12 on: May 28, 2011, 08:31:49 AM »
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  • Are their any traditional Carmelites who still do this?
    Stir up within Thy Church, we beseech Thee, O Lord, the Spirit with which blessed Josaphat, Thy Martyr and Bishop, was filled, when he laid down his life for his sheep: so that, through his intercession, we too may be moved and strengthen by the same Spir

    Offline Hobbledehoy

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    « Reply #13 on: May 30, 2011, 12:29:14 AM »
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  • I almost forgot the Feast of St. Mary Magdalene of Pazzi, whom the Carmelites commemorated on 25 May and the Roman Rite on 29 May.

    She is one of the most beautiful of the Carmelite mystics, whose love and zeal for God astound me with a wonder that well nigh approaches a sacred dread.

    Here are the Responsories that occur in her Proper Office found in the Carmelite Breviary, which incorporate the texts of the sacred Canticles in order to depict the sublime mystical union whereby Our Lord espoused her unto Himself:

    Quote
    My beloved Jesus is the Flower of the field, at Whose sight the Angels rejoice, * Upon Whose beauty the blessed are fed, and by Whose sweet perfume the dead are brought back to life, alleluia. V. As the apple tree among the trees of the woods, so is My beloved among the daughters. * Upon Whose beauty the blessed are fed, and by Whose sweet perfume the dead are brought back to life, alleluia. (i. Responsory at Matins)

    The Spouse of Jesus glows with charity, burns with desire: * Beside herself with the fire of love, she knoweth not whither to turn, alleluia. V. Stay up with me flowers, compass me about with apples, because I languish with love. * Beside herself in the fire of love, she knoweth not whither to turn, alleluia. (ii. Responsory at Matins)

    O happy soul of Magdalene, so aflame with the ardours of charity, * That it languished and fainted away with love, alleluia. V. My heart and my flesh have fainted away, O God of my heart, and Thou, O God, art my portion forever. * That it languished and fainted away with love, alleluia. (iii. Responsory at Matins)

    When I was yet young, I sought wisdom in my prayer: * I directed my soul unto her, and found her, alleluia. V. Thy good Spirit hath led me into the right land, and taught me to do Thy will. * I directed my soul unto her, and found her, alleluia. (iv. Responsory at Matins)

    A strong conflict did He give her, that she might overcome, and know that wisdom is mightier than all, and He descended with her into the pit, * And He forsook her not, alleluia. V. According to the multitude of my sorrows, Thy consolations have given joy to my soul. * And He forsook her not, alleluia. (v. Responsory at Matins)

    God forbid that I should glory save in the Cross of our Lord Jesus Christ, * By Whom the world is crucified to me, and I to the world, alleluia. V. I live, now not I, but Christ liveth in me. * By Whom the world is crucified to me, and I to the world, alleluia. (vi. Responsory at Matins)

    I have loved the beauty of Thy House, and the place where Thy glory dwelleth: * I have chosen to be an abject in Thy House rather than to dwell in the tabernacles of sinners, alleluia. V. How lovely are Thy tabernacles, O Lord of hosts: my soul longeth and fainteth for the courts of holy Religion. * I have chosen to be an abject in Thy House rather than to dwell in the tabernacles of sinners, alleluia. (vii. Responsory at Matins)

    A bundle of myrrh is my Beloved to me, amidst my breast shall He abide: * I have put Him as a seal upon my heart, as a seal upon my arm, alleluia. V. I adjure you, O daughters of Jerusalem, if you find my Beloved, that you tell Him that I languish with love. * I have put Him as a seal upon my heart, as a seal upon my arm, alleluia. (vii. Responsory at Matins, Feast of Saint Mary Magdalene of Pazzi, Virgin, Carmelite Breviary)

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    Offline Pyrrhos

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    « Reply #14 on: May 31, 2011, 06:54:15 AM »
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  • Quote from: Sigismund
    Are their any traditional Carmelites who still do this?


    There is certainly a group of Carmelites in Mexico, and I would guess that they use their proper Breviaries and Missals. I actually wonder about that, too, since the Carmelite Rite is practically dead.
    Very interesting photos of the Carmelite Solemn Mass can be seen here .

    Hobbledehoy, do you know about any literature that deals particularly with the Carthusian Rite? I could only find some pages in other books at the best. Apart from the Mozarabic Rite, they seem to have to most unique liturgy in the western sphere.
    If you are a theologian, you truly pray, and if you truly pray, you are a theologian. - Evagrius Ponticus

     

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