Catholic Info

Traditional Catholic Faith => The Sacred: Catholic Liturgy, Chant, Prayers => Topic started by: Trinity on July 20, 2010, 08:32:39 AM

Title: Hope and Charity
Post by: Trinity on July 20, 2010, 08:32:39 AM
Hope

1817 Hope is the theological virtue by which we desire the kingdom of heaven and eternal life as our happiness, placing our trust in Christ's promises and relying not on our own strength, but on the help of the grace of the Holy Spirit. "Let us hold fast the confession of our hope without wavering, for he who promised is faithful."84 "The Holy Spirit . . . he poured out upon us richly through Jesus Christ our Savior, so that we might be justified by his grace and become heirs in hope of eternal life."85

1818 The virtue of hope responds to the aspiration to happiness which God has placed in the heart of every man; it takes up the hopes that inspire men's activities and purifies them so as to order them to the Kingdom of heaven; it keeps man from discouragement; it sustains him during times of abandonment; it opens up his heart in expectation of eternal beatitude. Buoyed up by hope, he is preserved from selfishness and led to the happiness that flows from charity.

1819 Christian hope takes up and fulfills the hope of the chosen people which has its origin and model in the hope of Abraham, who was blessed abundantly by the promises of God fulfilled in Isaac, and who was purified by the test of the sacrifice.86 "Hoping against hope, he believed, and thus became the father of many nations."87

1820 Christian hope unfolds from the beginning of Jesus' preaching in the proclamation of the beatitudes. The beatitudes raise our hope toward heaven as the new Promised Land; they trace the path that leads through the trials that await the disciples of Jesus. But through the merits of Jesus Christ and of his Passion, God keeps us in the "hope that does not disappoint."88 Hope is the "sure and steadfast anchor of the soul . . . that enters . . . where Jesus has gone as a forerunner on our behalf."89 Hope is also a weapon that protects us in the struggle of salvation: "Let us . . . put on the breastplate of faith and charity, and for a helmet the hope of salvation."90 It affords us joy even under trial: "Rejoice in your hope, be patient in tribulation."91 Hope is expressed and nourished in prayer, especially in the Our Father, the summary of everything that hope leads us to desire.

1821 We can therefore hope in the glory of heaven promised by God to those who love him and do his will.92 In every circumstance, each one of us should hope, with the grace of God, to persevere "to the end"93 and to obtain the joy of heaven, as God's eternal reward for the good works accomplished with the grace of Christ. In hope, the Church prays for "all men to be saved."94 She longs to be united with Christ, her Bridegroom, in the glory of heaven:


Hope, O my soul, hope. You know neither the day nor the hour. Watch carefully, for everything passes quickly, even though your impatience makes doubtful what is certain, and turns a very short time into a long one. Dream that the more you struggle, the more you prove the love that you bear your God, and the more you will rejoice one day with your Beloved, in a happiness and rapture that can never end.95
Charity

1822 Charity is the theological virtue by which we love God above all things for his own sake, and our neighbor as ourselves for the love of God.

1823 Jesus makes charity the new commandment.96 By loving his own "to the end,"97 he makes manifest the Father's love which he receives. By loving one another, the disciples imitate the love of Jesus which they themselves receive. Whence Jesus says: "As the Father has loved me, so have I loved you; abide in my love." And again: "This is my commandment, that you love one another as I have loved you."98

1824 Fruit of the Spirit and fullness of the Law, charity keeps the commandments of God and his Christ: "Abide in my love. If you keep my commandments, you will abide in my love."99

1825 Christ died out of love for us, while we were still "enemies."100 The Lord asks us to love as he does, even our enemies, to make ourselves the neighbor of those farthest away, and to love children and the poor as Christ himself.101


The Apostle Paul has given an incomparable depiction of charity: "charity is patient and kind, charity is not jealous or boastful; it is not arrogant or rude. Charity does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful; it does not rejoice at wrong, but rejoices in the right. Charity bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things."102
1826 "If I . . . have not charity," says the Apostle, "I am nothing." Whatever my privilege, service, or even virtue, "if I . . . have not charity, I gain nothing."103 Charity is superior to all the virtues. It is the first of the theological virtues: "So faith, hope, charity abide, these three. But the greatest of these is charity."104

1827 The practice of all the virtues is animated and inspired by charity, which "binds everything together in perfect harmony";105 it is the form of the virtues; it articulates and orders them among themselves; it is the source and the goal of their Christian practice. Charity upholds and purifies our human ability to love, and raises it to the supernatural perfection of divine love.

1828 The practice of the moral life animated by charity gives to the Christian the spiritual freedom of the children of God. He no longer stands before God as a slave, in servile fear, or as a mercenary looking for wages, but as a son responding to the love of him who "first loved us":106


If we turn away from evil out of fear of punishment, we are in the position of slaves. If we pursue the enticement of wages, . . . we resemble mercenaries. Finally if we obey for the sake of the good itself and out of love for him who commands . . . we are in the position of children.107
1829 The fruits of charity are joy, peace, and mercy; charity demands beneficence and fraternal correction; it is benevolence; it fosters reciprocity and remains disinterested and generous; it is friendship and communion: Love is itself the fulfillment of all our works. There is the goal; that is why we run: we run toward it, and once we reach it, in it we shall find rest.108

Title: Hope and Charity
Post by: Matto on July 20, 2010, 08:44:56 AM
Trinity, I am confused. I thought you were a sedevacantist. But why would a sedevacantist post an excerpt from the new catechism of John Paul II? I thought sedevacantists would go back to the Roman Catechism, and disregard the new one. Am I mistaken in thinking you were a sedevacantist?
Title: Hope and Charity
Post by: Trinity on July 20, 2010, 09:03:02 AM
You are not mistaken.  I seem to be the one who is mistaken.  I obviously didn't know from the catechism of JP II.  Is there error in it?
Title: Hope and Charity
Post by: Matto on July 20, 2010, 09:18:33 AM
I recognized it was from the John Paul II Catechism because of the numbers. I don't know enough to say if there are errors in this excerpt. Maybe someone else here could answer that.
Title: Hope and Charity
Post by: Trinity on July 20, 2010, 09:40:41 AM
And a little child shall lead them.  I stand corrected.  My intentions are good--- to study the virtues and see if we discover something we hadn't hitherto thought of.  But I keep making boo boos.  Thanks for catching that, Matto.  Now we await those discerning minds who can find what we don't see.

Raoul said that the main reason for being sede is Dignatatis Humanae.  It wasn't my main reason.  No, the reason I turned my back on them was False Ecumenism, and that is the boogey I am sensitive to.  Not that I am for humanism, at all.  It is a very stupid heresy.
Title: Hope and Charity
Post by: MyrnaM on July 20, 2010, 10:17:59 AM
I only read the part about Hope right now, and I was wondering about this line, quoted below. Vatican II teaches that  the covenant has never been revoked; Not sure if I am correct but I thought I read where prior to Vatican II, it was taught that it was revoked.  

I am not a theologian, as if anyone thought I was.  :roll-laugh2:
 I do know that this is the way the enemy works they give some truth, change the meaning of words, doublespeak, and condition the people to accept changes little by little, like the story of the boiling frogs.  

There may really be nothing wrong with the quote below, but I sense a very subtle tone.  I admit I was reading with the notion to find some error.  Suspicious, yes, and could you blame me, after it was pointed out who said it.

Quote
1819 Christian hope takes up and fulfills the hope of the chosen people which has its origin and model in the hope of Abraham, who was blessed abundantly by the promises of God fulfilled in Isaac, and who was purified by the test of the sacrifice.86 "Hoping against hope, he believed, and thus became the father of many nations."87



Title: Hope and Charity
Post by: Trinity on July 20, 2010, 10:32:29 AM
Hoping against hope, he believed, and thus became the father of many nations."87  

I took that to be a quote from the Bible.  Am I wrong.  I seem to lack the requisite suspicion.
Title: Hope and Charity
Post by: MyrnaM on July 20, 2010, 11:34:59 AM
If its from the Bible of couse it can't be wrong.  Although one can take from the Bible to say almost anything one wants these days.  

My concern about that entire quote was, prior to Vatican II, the Jews were Catholic enemies because they did not accept the Saviour after He fulfilled all the prophesies in the Old Testament.  With Vatican II however there is a softening of that idea.  

That is what I meant when I said heresy is an exaggeration of truth,(in another thread here somewhere ) Vatican II takes a truth and S T R E T C H E S  it till it no longer is truth.  
Title: Hope and Charity
Post by: Trinity on July 20, 2010, 11:49:42 AM
I see what you mean.  It could be construed as Big Brother.  Perhaps they meant it that way.   We will not mean it that way.
Title: Hope and Charity
Post by: Trinity on July 20, 2010, 11:54:48 AM
Hope, O my soul, hope.

Here is where I get off on False Ecumenism.  How many souls now have false hope and will look no further.
Title: Hope and Charity
Post by: MyrnaM on July 20, 2010, 12:07:15 PM
Quote
Raoul said that the main reason for being sede is Dignatatis Humanae.


After I went to Fr. Denis lecture about "what is happening in the Catholic church, come hear from a Catholic priest"
the main reason why I left Vatican II, was I realized the Blessed Sacrament was not on the altar there.  I was concerned for myself, but for my children.   What?  I though my little ones never really made their First Communion.

Another women I talked to told me she knew Father Denis was telling the truth because she saw a golden aura around him.  Some people get it easy, I never see anything physical, but did see something spiritual, the truth.  
Title: Hope and Charity
Post by: Trinity on July 20, 2010, 12:36:51 PM
That is because you placed your hope in the Body of Christ and looked for it.  Now we have those who are "happy where they are."  There is no longer any visible church to question their position.  I consider that the worst sort of betrayal of Christ, who paid for these souls.  To paraphrase, doubtful hope is no hope.  Yet because they have hope, they will look no further.
Title: Hope and Charity
Post by: Trinity on July 22, 2010, 10:02:20 AM
Didn't seem to be much said for hope, but oh, well.  I will move on to charity.  

I would have put this up, but there was a copyright.  So here is a link to St. John of God, well known for his charity.

http://www.catholic.org/saints/saint.php?saint_id=68
Title: Hope and Charity
Post by: Trinity on July 22, 2010, 10:16:19 AM
I'm going to say something controversial.  It seems to me that charity protects hope.  The more evil one sees the more evil one feels until one has little to hope in.  Looking around here I get the notion that Catholics are about hate and dissent.
Title: Hope and Charity
Post by: Matto on July 22, 2010, 10:59:44 AM
Quote from: Trinity
I'm going to say something controversial.  It seems to me that charity protects hope.  The more evil one sees the more evil one feels until one has little to hope in.  Looking around here I get the notion that Catholics are about hate and dissent.


I do not think seeing evil should cause one to lose hope. Hope is a gift from God. It seems that seeing evil should increase your hope because the greater the evil, the greater is God's victory over evil.

Catholics are about hate and dissent; hatred of sin and dissent from evil.
Title: Hope and Charity
Post by: Trinity on July 22, 2010, 11:04:37 AM
I'm seeing them tearing into PEOPLE right and left.

Matto, you are young yet.  A few years of seeing conspiracies and evil in every hitherto trusted figure, and you will be huddled in a closet with a major case of paranoia.  Where then the hope?
Title: Hope and Charity
Post by: Matto on July 22, 2010, 11:21:32 AM
You are right that some people do attack each other viciously here, especially recently.

But the conspiracies are real. Is it better to trust evil men than to know they are evil and be weary? It is possible to understand that the world is ruled by men who are slaves of the devil without falling into despair because we know that God is greater than the devil and he will protect us if we are faithful to him. As for huddling in the closet, the early Christians did just that, hiding in caves because of Roman persecution, and they did not lose hope.
Title: Hope and Charity
Post by: Trinity on July 22, 2010, 11:37:02 AM
You will, though, if you are exposed to enough of it.  The early Christians had each other to support each other.  In time you will learn to trust no one, and will have no one to bouy your hope.  Check out these quotes of those who have been around this stuff for awhile.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Matthew said:


The saints were no exception to this. If any of them were alive today, they wouldn't be members of CathInfo, nevermind argue in the Crisis section with any regularity. They would be spending their time with family, reading spiritual books, praying, and doing good works like visiting the sick, helping the poor, etc.


Matthew
 


This is where I fall now...deep down, I think that everyone realizes that CathInfo (and other internet forums) bear little or no spiritual fruit that will help you become holier.

Thomas a Kempis said that when two people that have the spirit of Christ converse with each other it would bear great fruit for both of them, but I don't see how this is true for the majority of threads on this site and others.

In the two years that I've regularly posted here, I cannot attribute any spiritual growth to this site except my great leap backwards when I took CM as my guru (a very embarrassing time for me...if it were possible I would delete every single post of that arrogant fool, DeMaistre).


This is a quote from Vladimir in his thread Final Thoughts on Crisis in the Church.  Here is another one from him in that same thread.

I wasn't implying that it was the forum itself that was detrimental to me, just that it isn't a source of any real or significant spiritual fruit. In other words, its just something that's fun to do in the evening, etc. For this reason I think its best to leave it for now.

I've been praying all 15 decades of the Rosary daily for a few months now and prayerfully reading a lot of Saint Alphonsus. School is about to start up for me again, so I'll be pressed for time to pray and read good books, so CathInfo just needs to go, since its the least important.
 
.........................
 Hold on.  I  will get you another quote.
 
Title: Hope and Charity
Post by: Matto on July 22, 2010, 11:50:03 AM
Quote from: Trinity
In time you will learn to trust no one, and will have no one to bouy your hope.

I understand there is danger in becoming obsessed with conspiracy theories and spending lots of time learning about them, but you seem to be suggesting as an alternative to pretend everything is okay. I just see things as being bad, realize that there is nothing I can do about it, and try to live my life.
Title: Hope and Charity
Post by: Trinity on July 22, 2010, 11:50:46 AM
Mathew posted this in Cathinfo Declaration/ General Discussion

I do not wish to be reinstated into membership on Cathinfo. I find that my banishment was actually a blessing from God in that it allowed me to spend less time in internet polemics for which I was not fully prepared, and more time on personal spiritual development. I would appreciate it, however, if you would post my apology to the end of the thread here. Hotheadedness is a vice with which I have long struggled, and I do not wish for my heated comments to remain as-is, potentially leading others astray.

In Christ,
Matthew D. Hardin
Title: Hope and Charity
Post by: Trinity on July 22, 2010, 03:31:17 PM
No, Matto, I don't suggest that.  But I do suggest you place your trust in God, and don't think that you can out think the devil.  The more you try to protect yourself from every eventuality, the more you will find that you need protection.  And that is all you will find---plus the loss of your health.
Title: Hope and Charity
Post by: Trinity on July 24, 2010, 11:50:35 AM
From the book Lambs in Wolfskins by Eddie Doherty pgs 131-132

When Don Bosco chose St. Francis de Sales, among all the thousands of saints clustered about the throne of God, did he pickhim as carefully as he had picked his friends at school?  Or did he choose him because of a sort of love at first encounter which had ripened with the years?

Certainly the immortal Bishop of Geneva was the type of saint Don Bosco most admired.  He had been a missionary, a teacher of catechism, a writer of books and pamphlets, a great lover of the poor and a tremendous lover of Christ and Mary.

"Everything must be done by love," he had written, "nothing by force."  "The measure of love is to love without measure."  "Pluck out one of my eyes, and I shall look at you affectionately with the other."  "Give me souls; take all the rest."  "To speak well we need only to love well."

St. Francis de Sales, who died in 1622, one hundred and ninety-three years before John Bosco was born, took new life in his pupil's heart.  Today he and St. John Bosco are closer than Saints Peter and Paul.  They are inseparables.

St. Francis was born, Aug. 21, 1567, in the duchy of Savoy.  He was, like John Bosco, first taught about God by his mother.  When he was in his teens he was convinced that he was going to hell, to hate God throug all eternity.  Therefore he humbly begged that he might love God in this life as much as a man could, and to love Him every minute of that life.

At the height of his despondancy he knelt before a statue of the Virgin and asked her help.  He rose completely cured of any tendency toward despair.  As  a result, he consecrated himself to the Most Holy Lady, and determined to be a priest.  

He was sent, as a missionary, into the Chablais district of Savoy, then almost entirely Calvinistic.  It is said there were but 15 Catholics in the entire territory at the time.  He preached constantly to the people, but no one listened.  Then he began to write.  He spent many hours producing leaflets that he threw away where the Calvinists would find them.  When he left, out of a population estimated at 75,000 to 78,000, there remained only 15 Calvinists...

St Jane (Chantel) was given  a vision St. Francis before she met him.  She saw "an angelic countenance, one breathing of heaven"; and she was told, "This is the guide, beloved of God, into whose keeping you must give your conscience."

This was the man, beloved indeed of God, Don Bosco chose as his model wehn he wrote out his resolutions in the days before he was ordained.

"I shall try to carry with me everywhere the charity and gentleness of St. Francis de Sales.  May this charity illumine every step I take!"

Title: Hope and Charity
Post by: Trinity on July 24, 2010, 11:59:40 AM
Boy, that is replete with  typos.