Author Topic: Divine Office  (Read 1605 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Vladimir

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1707
  • Reputation: +494/-0
  • Gender: Male
Divine Office
« on: July 10, 2011, 08:22:39 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • How does a layperson go about praying the Divine office if one is interested? Are there set times during the day?



    Offline Hobbledehoy

    • Sr. Member
    • ****
    • Posts: 3746
    • Reputation: +4804/-5
    • Gender: Male
    Divine Office
    « Reply #1 on: July 10, 2011, 08:34:17 PM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • Hello!

    I have posted some resources on the Library for those interested in the Divine Office as well as an early translation of the Roman Breviary as it existed before the reforms of Pope St. Pius X.

    There are also the following works of St. Alphonsus that might help you in the study of the Divine Office:

    The Holy Mass

    The Divine Office

    The former book contains the treatise The Divine Office Hurriedly Said (pp. 446 ff.), which ought to be read by all who wish to seriously say the Divine Office, whilst the latter tome contains the Saint's celebrated commentary on the Psalms and Canticles of the ancient Roman Psalter.

    A book I would earnestly recommend (especially for those aspiring for Sacred Order or the Religious life) would be The Divine Office: How to Say it Devoutly, How to Make it a Pleasure by Rev. Fr. Paul O'Sullivan[/color][/u] (author of such books as The Wonders of the Holy Name, Read Me or Rue It, etc.).

    It is an excellent book, full of devout unction and deals with sublime topics in a language that is very accessible.
    Please ignore all that I have written regarding sedevacantism.


    Offline Hobbledehoy

    • Sr. Member
    • ****
    • Posts: 3746
    • Reputation: +4804/-5
    • Gender: Male
    Divine Office
    « Reply #2 on: July 10, 2011, 08:51:35 PM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • Quote from: Vladimir
    How does a layperson go about praying the Divine office if one is interested?


    From my own personal experience, the regular recitation of the Divine Office necessitates a preliminary study of the rubrics, the structure, and the content of the Office (the Hymns, Psalms, Canticles, Lessons, Responsories, Collects, etc.), as well as the devotional and spiritual aspect of the Divine Office. Of course, I did it by trial and error method since the rubrics have been difficult for every generation of clerics, and much more shall they be for mere layfolk like us.

    It is recommended that layfolk begin with either Prime and Compline of the Roman Breviary, or with the Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary, since these are relatively simple and unvarying in comparison with the Divine Office as a whole. Perhaps the practice of saying parts of the Office on Sunday in order to hallow the Lord's Day would be a great way to begin. It would make a wonderful preparation or thanksgiving for Holy Mass and Holy Communion, as this is how the Priests prepare themselves for such divine Mysteries.

    There is also the Office of the Dead, which is a great way to begin the cultivation of the regular recitation of the Divine Office, since it is a very ancient and simple form of the original Roman Office.

    Quote from: Vladimir
    Are there set times during the day?


    Traditionally, the Canonical Hours were recited as follows: Matins and Lauds very early in the morning so that Lauds ended at sunrise; Prime at about 6 AM; Terce at about 9 AM; Sext at about 12 PM; None at about 3 PM; Vespers at about 6 PM; and Compline at about 9 PM. Clerics and Religious (if allowed by their Rule or Superiors) were allowed to anticipate Matins and Lauds on the previous evening in private recitation if they foresaw that the recitation thereof on the following morning would be very inconvenient or unfeasible.

    However, this scheme is usually impractical for the average layman, so most layfolk who recite either the Roman Breviary or the Little Office of the Blessed Virgin, do something like the following: they may begin the morning with Prime and Terce; say Sext and None sometime around lunchtime; recite Vespers and Compline together in sometime in the early evening; and anticipate Matins and Lauds on the later evening, or recite them very early in the morning, followed by the recitation of Prime.

    This is at least what I did when I recited the Hours regularly at the University (I mostly omitted Matins for paucity of time).
    Please ignore all that I have written regarding sedevacantism.

    Offline Darcy

    • Full Member
    • ***
    • Posts: 481
    • Reputation: +113/-0
    Divine Office
    « Reply #3 on: July 10, 2011, 10:14:46 PM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • There was a recent post here regarding same and someone posted this site,
    http://divineoffice.org/

    and someone else said they preferred this site:
    http://www.breviary.net/


    Offline Sigismund

    • Hero Member
    • *****
    • Posts: 5359
    • Reputation: +3088/-2
    • Gender: Male
    Divine Office
    « Reply #4 on: July 11, 2011, 06:59:19 PM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • Although I expect many here would cast a disapproving glance my way for using the NO Liturgy of the Hours, This is what I do.

    I begin the day with Matins (The Office of Readings) and Lauds.  I say Mid-Day Prayer and the Angelus before lunch.  Vespers when I get home at abound 5:30, and Compline before going to bed.  On the rare occasions I go to bed later than midnight, I say Compline and the office of readings together.  I don't usually say Terce and None on workdays, but I do on weekends and holidays.   I am fortunate enough to work in a place where I can take a prayer break at lunch.  Being the owner of the business helps.  
    Stir up within Thy Church, we beseech Thee, O Lord, the Spirit with which blessed Josaphat, Thy Martyr and Bishop, was filled, when he laid down his life for his sheep: so that, through his intercession, we too may be moved and strengthen by the same Spir


    Offline Hobbledehoy

    • Sr. Member
    • ****
    • Posts: 3746
    • Reputation: +4804/-5
    • Gender: Male
    Divine Office
    « Reply #5 on: July 21, 2011, 09:59:15 PM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • For those interested in reciting the Divine Office, there is a very excellent book I would recommend: it is The Sacrifice of Praise: An Introduction to the Meaning and Use of The Divine Office by Vilma G. Little (London: Longmans, Green and Co. Ltd., 1957).

    I have attached chapter XIV, "The Divine Office and the Life of Prayer," which I believe is the most important chapter in the entire book. I have also attached Appendix D, which outlines the bodily positions that one ought to adopt (though not necessarily, as it depends on individual situational factors) during the recitation of the Divine Office.

    Enjoy!  :reading:

    Please ignore all that I have written regarding sedevacantism.

    Offline Sigismund

    • Hero Member
    • *****
    • Posts: 5359
    • Reputation: +3088/-2
    • Gender: Male
    Divine Office
    « Reply #6 on: July 22, 2011, 07:10:08 PM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • Hobble,

    That was really fascinating.  Thanks.
    Stir up within Thy Church, we beseech Thee, O Lord, the Spirit with which blessed Josaphat, Thy Martyr and Bishop, was filled, when he laid down his life for his sheep: so that, through his intercession, we too may be moved and strengthen by the same Spir

    Offline Sigismund

    • Hero Member
    • *****
    • Posts: 5359
    • Reputation: +3088/-2
    • Gender: Male
    Divine Office
    « Reply #7 on: July 22, 2011, 07:11:11 PM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • Gee, one more post and I will have five hund...Oops! :smile:
    Stir up within Thy Church, we beseech Thee, O Lord, the Spirit with which blessed Josaphat, Thy Martyr and Bishop, was filled, when he laid down his life for his sheep: so that, through his intercession, we too may be moved and strengthen by the same Spir


     

    Sitemap 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16