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Re: A New Saint?
« Reply #30 on: May 29, 2018, 02:40:36 AM »
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  • ditor's Note: Blessed Leonella Sgorbati, a Consolata missionary sister, was gunned down five days after Pope Benedict XVI’s Regensburg address, in which he quoted a Byzantine emperor who had criticized Mohammed. The beatification () took place in the cathedral in Piacenza.

    https://www.piacenza24.eu/suor-leonella-proclamata-beata-il-suo-esempio-porta-fiducia-ed-entusiasmo/

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    Re: A New Saint?
    « Reply #31 on: June 06, 2018, 02:22:26 AM »
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  • Born 1916 in Sant'Eramo al Colle, Italy, she was the youngest of 10 children, who all went on to be consecrated to God. Her mother, before she died and received Last Rites, had asked for this grace for her children, Avvenire reported.
    Sister Consolota entered the convent in 1936 with the Apostles of the Sacred Heart of Jesus Sisters, whom Padre Pio later chose to serve the sick in his beloved "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza" (Home for the Relief of Suffering).
    In September 1955, Sister Consolata was one of three sisters who came to San Giovanni Rotondo, where the hospital was located.
    She told Teleradio Padre Pio that when she first met the saintly man, she was struck by his "beautiful smile and playful demeanor." He told the three sisters to not worry because other religious would arrive. Six months later, there were already 15 religious working in the "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza."
    Sister Consolata worked at the hospital for 20 years, caring for patients alongside Padre Pio.
    In 1975, Sister Consolata stopped working at the hospital at age 59. According to Avvenire, she entered the cloister with the Capuchin Poor Clares to prepare for "a holy death," believing that she would die within a few years. However, she would go on to live for 42 more years, in a life of prayer and poverty until her death last week.

    https://www.catholic.org/news/saints/story.php?id=76991


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    Re: A New Saint?
    « Reply #32 on: June 10, 2018, 01:59:18 AM »
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  • The Archdiocese of Denver hosted a special Mass on Thursday in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the death of Julia Greeley, who is the first person from Colorado to be proposed for sainthood.
    Archbishop Samuel Aquila said Greeley was a holy woman who suffered as a former slave and was riddled with arthritis, but still embraced the love of Christ and lived it out.
    “How difficult her early life must have been in terms of experiencing slavery, watching her own mother being beaten, losing her own eye,” Archbishop Aquila told CNA.
    “And then, her encounter with Jesus Christ...She knew the love of Christ for her, she knew that she was truly a daughter of the Father, and she lived that out.”
    The Mass in Greeley’s honor took place at Denver’s Cathedral Basilica of the Immaculate Conception on the evening of June 7. Archbishop Aquila celebrated the Mass and, among others, was joined by Capuchin Friar Father Blaine Burkey, who wrote a biography of Greeley.
    Numerous organizations were represented at the Mass, including the Julia Greeley Guild, a group raising awareness of her canonization cause; the Secular Franciscans, a lay Catholic community with whom she had been involved; and Denver’s fire department, which provided special honor guards to recognize her service to the community’s firefighters.
    A letter from Governor John Hickenlooper of Colorado was also read declaring this week, June 3-9, 2018, to be “Julia Greeley Week.”
    Born a slave in Hannibal, Missouri sometime between 1833 and 1848, Greeley endured horrific treatment – once, a whip caught her right eye and destroyed it as a slave master beat her mother.
    One of many slaves freed by Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, Greeley’s work with the family of William Gilpin, Colorado’s first territorial governor, brought her to Denver in 1878. Influenced by Gilpin’s wife, who was a devout Catholic, Greeley converted to Catholicism in 1880.
    She was an enthusiastic parishioner, a daily communicant, and became an active member of the Secular Franciscan Order starting in 1901. The Jesuit priests at her parish recognized her as the most fervent promoter of devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus.
    During her four decades in Colorado, Greely became known as the “Angel of Charity.” After leaving the Gilpins' service, Greeley found odd jobs around the city. She would beg for goods and then offer them to the poor.
    Pulling a red wagon behind her, she would hand out clothes, foods, and medicine to the impoverished, acting at night so as not to embarrass those she helped.
    Mary Leisring, president of the Julia Greeley Guild, told CNA that “at one point, someone said they saw her walking down the street with a mattress on her back because she knew that someone needed a mattress.”
    Having a strong devotion to the Sacred Heart, Greeley would also deliver Sacred Heart pamphlets to the local firefighters to provide spiritual nourishment. She would travel on foot every month to the fire departments around Denver.
    Archbishop Aquila said Greeley was an inspiration because, despite her pains and difficulties, she embraced the love of Christ.
    “[She] became extremely generous in the outpouring of her own life, even in the midst of her physical condition, was not shy at all about proclaiming Christ and the good news of the Gospel, and especially with her generosity with the poor,” he said.
    Her cause for canonization was officially opened in December 2016, and, on the 99th anniversary of her death, her remains were interred in the cathedral. The local investigation into Greeley’s canonization will likely be closed by this August. A few alleged miracles, credited to her intercession, have been reported and are being reviewed.

    https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/denver-celebrates-mass-on-100th-anniversary-of-julia-greeleys-death-93782

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    Re: A New Saint?
    « Reply #33 on: June 19, 2018, 02:32:31 AM »
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  • Blessed Carmen Rendiles Martínez (1903-77) founded the Servants of Jesus of Caracas. “Along with her sisters, she served with love in the parishes, in the schools, and beside those most in need,” Pope Francis said on June 17. “Let us praise the Lord for her, His faithful disciple, and entrust our prayers for the Venezuelan people to her intercession.”




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    Re: A New Saint?
    « Reply #34 on: June 26, 2018, 04:35:34 AM »
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  • Known as “la Chiquitunga,” Blessed María Guggiari Echeverría, OCD, “enthusiastically joined Catholic Action and took care of the elderly, sick, and imprisoned,” Pope Francis said on June 24. “She died at the age of 34, accepting her illness with serenity. The witness of this young Blessed is an invitation to all young people, especially Paraguayans, to live life with generosity, gentleness and joy.”

    https://www.catholicculture.org/news/

    https://www.efe.com/efe/america/sociedad/miles-de-paraguayos-celebran-la-beatificacion-monja-carmelita-chiquitunga/20000013-3659566


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    Re: A New Saint?
    « Reply #35 on: July 07, 2018, 02:06:37 AM »
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  •  Carlo Acutis, who died of leukemia at the age of 15, offering his suffering for the pope and for the Church, was among four laypeople whose heroic virtues were recognized by the Congregation for the Causes of Saints on Thursday.
    Pope Francis authorized the congregation to promulgate the decree July 5, which advances Acutis' cause and names him Venerable.
    Acutis was born in London May 3, 1991, to Italian parents who soon returned to Milan. He was a pious child, attending daily Mass, frequently praying the rosary, and making weekly confessions.
    Exceptionally gifted in working with computers, Acutis developed a website which catalogued Eucharistic miracles. This website was the genesis of The Eucharistic Miracles of the World, an international exhibition which highlights such occurrences.
    Acutis died of leukemia in Monza, near Milan, Oct. 12, 2006.
    Acutis stated that “To always be close to Jesus, that’s my life plan. I'm happy to die because I've lived my life without wasting even a minute of it doing things that wouldn't have pleased God.”
    He also said that “our aim has to be the infinite and not the finite. The Infinite is our homeland. We have always been expected in Heaven,” and he called the Eucharist “my highway to heaven.”
    Abbot Michelangelo Tiribilli, the then-Abbot of the Territorial Abbey of Montel Oliveto Maggiore, wrote in the foreword to a biography of Acutis that “By looking at this adolescent as one of them and as someone who was captivated by the love of Christ, which enabled him to experience pure joy, [today's adolescents] will be in contact with an experience of life that doesn't take anything away from the richness of their teenage years, but which actually makes them more valuable.”

    https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/venerable-carlo-acutis-a-patron-of-computer-programmers-69517

    To always be close to Jesus was Carlos' life plan. I think we should make that our life plan.

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    Re: A New Saint?
    « Reply #36 on: July 19, 2018, 02:39:13 AM »
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  • A formal call for testimony has been issued, the first step of an investigation into the possible sainthood of Chiara Corbella Petrillo, a young Italian mother who died in 2012.
    The call was issued by Cardinal Angelo De Donatis, Vicar General of Rome, earlier this month.
    The formal edict, signed July 2, calls Corbella a “Servant of God,” a title used for those under formal consideration for beatification and canonization. It recognizes her “increasing reputation for holiness” and invites “all the faithful, together and individually” to submit any information which could argue “for or against” her cause.
    The call for testimony comes just over a year after her cause for canonization was announced on June 17 last year, the fifth anniversary of her death on June 13, 2012.
    De Donatis, who handles the day-to-day governance of the Diocese of Rome on behalf of the pope, asked anyone with information which could help Church authorities consider her case to send it to the diocesan tribunal of Rome. When diocesan authorities believe they have sufficient testimony, the file will be sent to the Vatican’s Congregation for the Cause of Saints.
    The edict contains a special request for anything written by the prospective saint to be sent to the Diocese of Rome for inclusion in the case.
    Chiara Corbella met her husband Enrico Petrillo at Medjugorje in 2002, when she was 18. They married in Italy on September 21, 2008. During the early years of their marriage, the young couple faced many hardships, including the death of two children, who both died only 30 minutes after birth.
    Corbella became pregnant a third time with their son, Francesco in 2010. However, the news of her pregnancy also came with a fatal diagnosis of cancer for Chiara. Her cancer was an unusual lesion of the tongue, which was later discovered to be a carcinoma.
    Corbella rejected any treatment that could have saved her life during pregnancy because it would have risked the life of her unborn son. Her treatment only began after her son was born, in May 2011, after the cancer had progressed. It eventually became difficult for Chiara to speak and see clearly, eventually making her final days particularly excruciating.
    A year after Francesco was born, Corbella died.
    A biography of her, entitled Chiara Corbella Petrillo: A Witness to Joy, has been published by Sophia Institute Press.
    “In the story of the Petrillo couple, many people recognize a providential consolation from heaven,” said Simone Troisi and Christiana Paccini, close friends of the Petrillos who wrote the biography.
    “Her suffering became a holy place because it was the place where she encountered God,” Troisi and Paccini recalled.
    Although many couples face hardships, Troisi and Paccini remembered something different about the Petrillos - they leaned on God’s grace which made their family particularly serene. They made peace with the reality that Corbella would never grow old with Enrico or watch Francesco grow up.
    During her last days, her husband Enrico embraced God’s grace just as she did, saying, “If she is going to be with Someone who loves her more than I, why should I be upset?”
    Corbella died on June 13, 2012 at home in her wedding gown, surrounded by her family and friends. Corbella continued to be a witness to joy, even after her death.
    Troisi and Paccini believe that Corbella’s legacy is still living on through her witness to the truth that “love exists.” Neither she nor Enrico were afraid of love, marriage, or of committing themselves to their family. However, they were quick to note that Chiara was not “an extraordinary young woman, in a way that makes her different from us.” Rather, she struggled with many human fears and anxieties, especially with thoughts of pain, vomiting, and even of purgatory.
    “She had the same questions that we have, the same objections and struggles, the same fears,” Troisi and Paccini noted, saying what made her different was her “capacity to cast everything on the Father, to welcome the grace needed for whatever step she had to make.”
    Corbella has been called “a saint for our times.” Her case remains open in the Diocese of Rome.

    https://cruxnow.com/vatican/2018/07/18/first-step-of-sainthood-for-woman-who-refused-cancer-treatment-for-unborn-child/

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    Re: A New Saint?
    « Reply #37 on: July 29, 2018, 02:31:27 AM »
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  • Dozens of witnesses have already been heard as part of the beatification process for murdered French priest, Jacques Hamel, with the diocesan phase expected to conclude its investigation by the end of the year.
    Eighty-five-year-old Father Jacques Hamel was knifed to death by Islamist militants July 26, 2016 while celebrating Mass at St. Etienne du Rouvray in Normandy, northern France. The priest belonged to the Archdiocese of Rouen.
    The process for the beatification of Father Hamel began in 2017 following the Vatican’s Congregation for the Cause of Saints rescript granting “dispensation” from the five-year delay traditionally required.
    The life of Father Jacques Hamel was “very impressive,” said Father Paul Vigouroux, the postulator for the beatification of the assassinated priest.
    Father Vigouroux, who also comes from the Archdiocese of Rouen, did not know Father Hamel personally but has learned to appreciate the latter’s life of prayer since he began to study the case in May 2017.
    In fact, an in depth investigation of the holiness of a candidate’s life forms the first step in the process.

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    Father Jacques Hamel's beatification process progressing well
    The first phase of the investigation undertaken by the Archdiocese of Rouen is expected to be completed by the end of 2018
    Julien Tranié
     France
    July 26, 2018
    [img width=100%]https://international.la-croix.com/uploads/news/2018/07/1532564451.jpg[/img]
    Portrait of Father Jacques Hamel in the church of St. Étienne du Rouvray where he was killed on July 26, 2016. (Photo by Michael Bunel/Ciric) 
    Dozens of witnesses have already been heard as part of the beatification process for murdered French priest, Jacques Hamel, with the diocesan phase expected to conclude its investigation by the end of the year.
    Eighty-five-year-old Father Jacques Hamel was knifed to death by Islamist militants July 26, 2016 while celebrating Mass at St. Etienne du Rouvray in Normandy, northern France. The priest belonged to the Archdiocese of Rouen.
    The process for the beatification of Father Hamel began in 2017 following the Vatican’s Congregation for the Cause of Saints rescript granting “dispensation” from the five-year delay traditionally required.
    The life of Father Jacques Hamel was “very impressive,” said Father Paul Vigouroux, the postulator for the beatification of the assassinated priest.
    Father Vigouroux, who also comes from the Archdiocese of Rouen, did not know Father Hamel personally but has learned to appreciate the latter’s life of prayer since he began to study the case in May 2017.
    In fact, an in depth investigation of the holiness of a candidate’s life forms the first step in the process.
    “We have not stopped for more than a year,” Father Vigouroux said.
    “The diocesan investigation, which covers three areas, should be complete by the end of 2018,” he said.
    The tribunal established for this purpose includes a priest delegated as a judge by the archbishop of Rouen, a promoter of justice, namely a monk from the Abbey of Saint Wandrille, plus three volunteer lay “notaries,” who play the role of recorders.
    Testimony has already been gathered from 48 witnesses to Father Hamel’s life, including those present at his assassination, from an anticipated total of nearly 65 witnesses. Members of Father Hamel’s family will also be interviewed in a series of hearings, each of which takes from two to three hours.
    More than 600 homilies by Father Hamel
    The second step of the process is the establishment of a six member “archive commission,” which is responsible for the major task of gathering all the documents relating to Father Hamel’s life, said Father Vigouroux.
    This commission has now almost completed this work and is expected to present its report in autumn.
    The third and final research task requires gathering all of Father Hamel’s writings. In this case, however, “no official writings exist and we have not found any private writings,” said Father Vigouroux.
    However, he and his team have located nearly 600 homilies drafted by Father Hamel “in the form of extensive notes.”
    After transcription, two theologians will study “the theological aspects” of Father Hamel’s thought as revealed by the notes.
    In light of the progress to date, Father Vigouroux is optimistic that the diocesan process will be completed rapidly.
    “Based on where we are now, we expect to finish by Dec. 31,” he said.
    Transfer of the file to Rome
    Once the initial investigation is over, the postulator and promoter of justice set aside a period for reflection and discernment before deciding whether to conclude the process or to further research Father Hamel’s life.
    They will then need another two to three months to copy the relevant documents, before binding them and affixing the bishop’s wax seal, marking the conclusion of the diocesan phase of the beatification process.
    The file will then be sent to Rome where the Congregation for the Causes of Saints will examine the material and prepare a report for the pope advising whether or not to declare Father Hamel as a martyr, enabling his beatification.
    The Catholic Church recognizes a deeply divine dimension in a martyr’s death, which recalls the mystery of the cross of Christ, as in the case of Father Hamel’s death.

    https://international.la-croix.com/news/father-jacques-hamels-beatification-process-progressing-well/8141#


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    Re: A New Saint?
    « Reply #38 on: August 05, 2018, 02:05:56 AM »
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  • An order of Benedictine nuns based near the site in London where Catholics were martyred during the Reformation announced Friday they will soon open a house at the childhood home of their foundress, whose cause for canonization was opened in 2016.
    The Adorers of the Sacred Heart of Jesus of Montmartre, OSB, will formally open a chapel in Grancey-le-Chateau, 25 miles southest of Langres, France, Aug. 15, at the property where their foundress, Mother Marie-Adèle Garnier, was born in 1838.
    “We give thanks to the Sacred Heart for this historic moment for our Congregation. Our sisters from all over the world are gathered here together to remember the birth of our foundress - the birth of our Monastic Family,” Mother Marilla Aw, OSB, superior general of the order, said Aug. 3.
    “We hope that the opening of this house will be an impetus for many people to come to know the charism of our Mother Foundress who is now a Servant of God. Her teachings are profound, and she has already led many souls to the adoration of the Heart of Jesus hidden in the Eucharist.”
    The chapel at the site, Maison Garnier, is dedicated to Our Lady of the Assumption. The nuns hope the site will become a pilgrimage destination for those devoted to Mother Marie-Adèle. The property includes a museum and a conference and retreat center.
    Mother Marie-Adèle founded the Adorers of the Sacred Heart of Jesus of Montmartre in 1898. The order is dedicated to perpetual adoration of the Blessed Sacrament.
    In 1901, the anti-clerical French government passed the Law of Associations, which greatly expanded the state's authority over religious orders and regulated their educational work. As a result, the sisters went into exile in London, where they were able to freely wear a habit for the first time.
    They eventually settled at Tyburn, the London site where in the 16th and 17th centuries several hundred martyrs – priests, religious, and lay men and women – were executed by the Protestant state for their refusal to give up their Catholic faith.
    Throughout her life as a religious, Mother Garnier, who now went by Mother Mary of St. Peter, experienced intense physical suffering, so much so that when she went more than two hours without suffering, she wondered if Christ had forgotten her.
    Despite her sufferings, which included debilitating migraines, her sisters say she remained cheerful and gentle with everyone, and counseled other sisters through their trials.
    The order as a whole also suffered financial problems and strange demonic attacks, including instances of possession or objects being picked up and thrown across the room. But Christ promised Mother Mary of St. Peter that he would not let the order dissolve.
    In 1922, Christ appeared to Mother Mary of St. Peter and told her that she would suffer and die soon. For the next two years, she suffered intense chest pains and congestion problems, until she became bedridden.
    On November 15, 1923, on a Host a priest brought her, she saw the Heart of Jesus, alive in the Eucharist. She died June 17, 1924 at the Tyburn convent.
    Her cause for canonization was opened Dec. 3, 2016 by Bishop Joseph-Marie-Edouard de Metz-Noblat of Langres.
    Today, the contemplative order has spread throughout the world, with convents in England, Scotland, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, Peru, Ecuador, Colombia, Italy, and France.

    https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/tyburn-nuns-to-open-chapel-at-foundress-birthplace-40997

    I invite everyone to spend a little extra time before Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament.

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    Re: A New Saint?
    « Reply #39 on: August 16, 2018, 04:01:10 AM »
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  • Guadalupe Ortiz de Landázuri, a Spanish member of Opus Dei who is moving toward beatification, teaches us that sanctity can be found amidst chemistry books and classrooms, said a priest leading her cause.
    Spanish priest Fr. José Carlos Martinez de la Hoz, who is responsible for the canonization causes of Opus Dei members in Spain, said that Guadalupe’s life contains a simple message: “Holiness is in the ordinary.”
    “She became holy giving chemistry classes, being a good professor, and this tells the rest of us that we can achieve the same in an ordinary life,” he reflected.
    “Guadalupe lived dedicated to her chemistry students, dedicated to souls and especially her mother who died a half hour after her. She lived dedicated to God and others, despite her serious heart disease which at the end of her life really slowed her down.”
    In June, Pope Francis authorized the Congregation for the Causes of Saints to publish the decree approving on a miracle attributed to Guadalupe’s intercession.
    The miracle involved a 76-year-old man suffering from a malignant skin tumor near his eye. After praying to Guadalupe in 2002, the tumor instantaneously and inexplicably disappeared.
    In addition to this recognized miracle, Martinez de la Hoz said “there are many favors from people who start to lose hope and Guadalupe has given them back peace, thanks to the patience that she had.”
    Guadalupe was born in Madrid in 1916. She studied chemical sciences and was one of five women in her graduating class.
    She met St. Josemaría Escrivá, the founder of Opus Dei, in early 1944. According to Martinez de la Hoz, “one Sunday in 1944 when she was at Mass in the church of the Conception on Goya Street in Madrid, she became distracted and heard the voice of God inside telling her that although she had a boyfriend, he had something else prepared for her. She left Mass impacted by this and knew that was God's call.”
    “On the tram going back home after Mass, she met Jesús Hernando de Pablos, a family friend, and she asked him if he knew of any priest she could talk with. He gave her St. Josemaría's contacts and she started to go to him for spiritual direction,” the priest told ACI Prensa, CNA's Spanish-language sister agency.
    St. Josemaría Escrivá taught her that Christ can be found in professional work and ordinary life.
    “I had the clear sensation that God was speaking to me through that priest,” Guadalupe would later say.
    Martinez de la Hoz noted that “when Guadalupe discovered her vocation at 23, she had a boyfriend, was a chemistry teacher and lived with her mother. From that time on, she was in good spirits because of the intimate conviction of doing what God wants.”
    On March 19, 1944, Guadalupe joined Opus Dei as a numerary, committing to celibacy and complete availability for the work of the prelature. Numeraries normally live in an Opus Dei center. However, she did not go to live at a center, but settled into an apartment with her mother, who needed care due to her advanced age.
    During her first years as an Opus Dei member, Guadalupe worked primarily in the Christian formation of young people in Madrid and Bilbao. She was later sent to Mexico to begin the apostolic work of Opus Dei there.
    In 1956, she settled in Rome, where she worked with St. Josemaría in the administration of Opus Dei. After two years, because of health reasons, she moved back to Spain, where she again took up teaching and scientific research. She then finished her doctoral thesis in chemistry.
    Martinez de la Hoz said that what stood out about Guadalupe was “her smile, her good humor, her laughter...She was a woman who preferred to not dwell on the negative, and who completely trusted in God.”
    The priest emphasized that what really brought Guadalupe to sanctity was her patience as a chemistry professor.
    At the same time, she continued to work in Christian formation in Opus Dei. In all her actions, she reflected her strong desire to love God in her work, her friendship and with a deep joy that radiated peace and serenity, he said.
    Guadalupe died of heart disease in Pamplona, Spain on the feast of Our Lady of Mount Carmel in 1975. She was 59 years old and at the time of her death held a reputation of sanctity. Favors attributed to her intercession were quickly reported.
    Her beatification cause was begun in the Archdiocese of Madrid in 2001, and was sent on to Rome in 2006.

    https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/life-of-spanish-chemistry-professor-shows-holiness-is-in-the-ordinary-25943

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    Re: A New Saint?
    « Reply #40 on: September 17, 2018, 05:47:22 AM »
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  • A personal encounter with Mother Alphonse Marie Eppinger inspired “conversions which were far more miraculous than the raising of the dead,” recounted her spiritual director, Father Jean-David Reichard. The nineteenth century French mystic and religious founder was beatified this week in her native Strasbourg after a miraculous physical healing through her intercession was confirmed.
    Cardinal Giovanni Angelo Becciu, prefect of the Congregation for Causes of the Saints, celebrated the beatification Mass in the Cathedral of Notre Dame on Sept. 9 in Strasbourg, France.
    Mother Alphonse Marie had “the gift of seeing people, what is in their souls,” wrote Abbe Glöckler, who knew Eppinger personally and later wrote her biography.
    “She had a right word and advice for everyone. God gifted her with a good mind and right judgment. Many left her with the decision to change their lives and to walk the right path.”
    Eppinger was able to “scrutinize human hearts” and “reveal things that were hidden,” using these spiritual gifts to advise the priests who would “visit her in abundant numbers” seeking counsel.
    God gave her a specific commission for priests,” Glöckler continued, “She told them about dignity and the grandeur of the priesthood.  She prayed a lot for priests, the Holy Father, and the Diocesan Bishop.” Eppinger also composed many several prayers for confessors.
    Speaking at the Mass of beatification, Cardinal Becciu called the occasion a “providential opportunity to rediscover, 150 years after her death,  … the testimony of an authentic Christian life and a deep spirituality.”
    The eldest of eleven children, Elizabeth Eppinger, was born into a peasant family on Sept. 9, 1814, in Niederbronn, France.
    Her devotion to Christ’s passion stemmed from an episode in her childhood, which Cardinal Becciu recounted in his homily:
    “As a child - when she was still called Elizabeth - one day on the way to a station of the Stations of the Cross, she asked her mother, ‘Why did they crucify Jesus?’”
    “‘My little one, he was killed because of our sins," he replied her mother.”
    “‘But what is a sin?" insisted Elizabeth. ‘It's an offense to God …’”
    “‘Well, I do not want to offend him anymore!’” she replied.”
    Eppinger’s devotion deepened through her experience of suffering through a serious illness with which she struggled intermittently throughout her life. It kept her bedridden for years at a time, prayerfully “immersed in the mystery of the cross.”
    It was during her illness that Eppinger received her first vision of Christ and that her mystical gifts became well known.
    At the request of her bishop, Eppinger founded the Congregation of the Sisters of the Most Holy Saviour in 1848, taking the religious name Sister Alphonse Marie, in honor of her great devotion to Saint Alphonsus de Liguori, whom she made patron of the new congregation.
    She asked her sisters to meditate daily on the passion of Christ, and she encouraged devotion to Eucharistic adoration. In addition to their devotions, the sisters also aided the sick during epidemics, including a cholera outbreak in 1854.
    Mother Alphonse Marie died in 1867. Ten years after her death, the congregation she founded had grown to include 550 sisters in 88 religious houses throughout Europe. Today the sisters are present  in 68 dioceses accross 16 countries, and they continue to serve others through the ministries of health care, social services and education
    In his Sunday Angelus address, Pope Francis expressed gratitude for  Mother Alphonsus Marie’s beatification:
    “Let us thank God for this courageous and wise woman who, in suffering, in silence, and in prayer, witnessed the love of God especially to those who were sick in body and in spirit.”

    https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/mystic-and-religious-founder-mother-alphonse-marie-beatified-in-strasbourg-france-75903

    I ask God for the grace to say the right thing to the right person, especially the children.


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    Re: A New Saint?
    « Reply #41 on: September 20, 2018, 03:14:49 AM »
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  • The Archdiocese of Cuttack-Bhubaneswar in eastern India’s Odisha state is currently gathering information and evidence on the martyrdom of some 100 people who were killed in the brutal anti-Christian violence that erupted in the state on August 25, 2008.
    Violence of August 2008 
    The initiative is taking place 10 years after Hindu extremists unleashed untold atrocities on Christians, mostly in Kandhamal District, blaming them for the August 23 murder of Hindu leader Swami Lakshmanananda Saraswati and four of his disciples. 
    Even though Maoist rebels claimed the assassination, the carefully orchestrated violence continued unabated for months.
    The violence displaced an estimated 56,000 Christians.  Many who sought shelter in the forests perished because of hunger and snakebites. Church and social activists reported the destruction of almost 300 churches, besides convents, schools, hostels and welfare facilities. 
    Cause of martyrdom
    In a letter on December 3, 2017, Archbishop John Barwa of Cuttack-Bhubaneswar appointed Father Purushottam Nayak to research and prepare a dossier on the martyrs, a process before formally initiating the cause of their martyrdom and sainthood at the diocesan level.   After the diocesan process, the cases will be handed over to the Vatican for further examination and verification.
    Fr. Nayak, who is based in Raikia, took up his mandate on 1 January, 2018. He told Vatican News that he has drawn up a list of 105 martyrs among whom are 7 Catholics.  The list inclues Christians of other denominations as well as Hindus, Muslims and others who were killed just because they helped, sheltered or defended their Christian brothers and sisters.   He said that the archdiocese plans to honour non-Catholics and non-Christians in appreciation and recognition for sacrificing their lives for their Christian brothers and sisters. 
    Collecting evidence 
     
    Fr. Nayak is heading a 7-member team, all priests including him, in this task of gathering evidence on the martyrdom.  His team follows a prescribed procedure in gathering information.  This includes a critical biography of the martyr candidate, a report on the virtues , such as faith, hope charity and generosity, reports on holiness and favours received, if any, through the candidate’s intercession  and any possible obstacle to the cause.  The team also has to gather information on all public writings on the candidate or his/her martyrdom and make a list of witnesses , both favourable and not favourable to the cause of martyrdom.    
    Difficulties
    The main sources of evidence for Fr. Nayak and his team have been eyewitnesses, family members and relatives, whose interviews are recorded and documented to find out the motives behind the killings.
    Fr. Nayak said that the practical difficulties they face in gathering information is locating the victims who have been displaced and scattered after the 2008 persecution.  The team tries to reach out to them through relatives, parish priests, catechists and lay people
    Many of the victims’ families, Fr. Nayak said, are still traumatized and the deep wounds that they suffered in 2008 are still fresh in their memory.  Many are reluctant to talk freely, as they are frightened of repercussions living among Hindus in alien surroundings far from their own their homes and villages. 
    Honouring other Christians and non-Christians
    Fr. Nayak’s team has documented only 15 cases of martyrdom so far, out of which 7 are Catholics.   They were to complete their job by the end of this year, but the priest said it appears very difficult to finish the remaining 90 cases in 3 months, so they will need more time. 
    Fr, Nayak said the archdiocese already has a martyrs’ memorial in Tiangia, the worst affected by the 2008 violence, where 7 Catholics perished, the highest from a single place.  Cuttack-Bhubaneshwar Archdiocese also plans to have a memorial for the martyrs of other Christian denominations and Hindus. 

    https://www.vaticannews.va/en/church/news/2018-09/india-martyrs-kandhamal-odisha-catholic-church.html

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    Re: A New Saint?
    « Reply #42 on: October 07, 2018, 12:17:49 AM »
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  • The Algerian bishops' conference has announced that the beatification of Bishop Pierre Claverie and his 18 companions, who were martyred in the country between 1994 and 1996, will be held Dec. 8.
    The beatification will take place at the Shrine of Our Lady of the Holy Cross in Oran.
    The new blesseds “have been given to us as intercessors and models of the Christian life, of friendship and fraternity, of encounter and dialogue. May their example aid us in our life today,” the Algerian bishops wrote.
    “From Algeria, their beatification will be for the Church and for the world, an impetus and a call to build together a world of peace and fraternity.”
    In January Pope Francis had authorized the Congregation for the Causes of Saints to recognize the martyrdoms.
    Claverie was a French Algerian, and the Bishop of Oran from 1981 until his Aug. 1, 1996 martyrdom. He and his companions were killed during the Algerian Civil War by Islamists.
    In addition to Claverie, those being beatified are: Brother Henri Vergès, Sister Paul-Hélène Saint-Raymond, Sister Esther Paniagua Alonso, Sister Caridad Álvarez Martín, Fr. Jean Chevillard, Fr. Alain Dieulangard, Fr. Charles Deckers, Fr. Christian Chessel, Sister Angèle-Marie Littlejohn, Sister Bibiane Leclercq, Sister Odette Prévost, Brother Luc Dochier, Brother Christian de Chergé, Brother Christophe Lebreton, Brother Michel Fleury, Brother Bruno Lemarchand, Brother Célestin Ringeard, and Brother Paul Favre-Miville.
    The best known of Claverie's companions are the seven monks of Tibhirine, who were kidnapped from their Trappist priory in March 1996. They were kept as a bartering chip to procure the release of several imprisoned members of the Armed Islamic Group of Algeria, and were killed in May. Their story was dramatized in the 2010 French film Of Gods and Men, which won the Grand Prix at the Cannes Film Festival.
    The prior, Christian de Chergé, sought peaceful dialogue with the Muslim population of the area and provided employment, medical attention, and education to the locals.
    Dom Christian accepted that the current political tensions and violent militias were a threat to his life. According to the Trappist order, he wrote a letter to his community and family, citing the peace felt giving his life to God.  
    “If it should happen one day – and it could be today – that I become a victim of the terrorism which now seems ready to engulf all the foreigners living in Algeria, I would like my community, my Church and my family to remember that my life was given to God and to this country,” he said.
    After the death of the monks of Tibhirine, Bishop Claverie knew his life was in serious danger. A bomb exploded at the entrance of his chancery Aug. 1, 1996, killing him and an aide, Mohamed Bouchikhi.
    Sister Esther Paniagua Alonso and Sister Caridad Álvarez Martín were Augustinian missionaries from Spain who were killed Oct. 23, 1994 in Algiers.

    https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/algerian-martyrs-to-be-beatified-in-december-66482

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    Re: A New Saint?
    « Reply #43 on: October 13, 2018, 11:57:25 PM »
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  • Blessed Vincent Romano

    Born in 1751 and ordained a priest in 1775, Romano had studied the writings of St. Alphonsus de Liguori and developed a devotion to the Blessed Sacrament. He spent his whole life as a priest in Torre del Greco and was known for his simple ways and his care for orphans. He worked to rebuild his parish, often with his bare hands, after the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 1794. He died in December 1831 of pneumonia and was beatified by Paul VI in 1963.

    https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/the-seven-saints-pope-francis-will-canonize-on-sunday-73292

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    Re: A New Saint?
    « Reply #44 on: November 10, 2018, 02:44:57 AM »
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  • he Vatican has issued sixteen decrees advancing the causes of candidates for canonization and beatification.
    With the approval of Pope Francis, the Congregation for the Causes of Saints proclaimed the martyrdom of Brother James Alfred Miller, and American religious who was killed in Guatemala in 1982. The Congregation also confirmed the “cult from time immemorial” of Michele Giedrojc, a layman who lived in the 15th century in what is now Lithuania and Poland. The decree, equivalent to beatification, gives him the title of “Blessed.”
    In other decrees, the Congregation recognized ten martyrs of the Spanish Civil War; certified miracles attributed to two Italian woman, who now become eligible for beatification and confirmed the “heroic virtue” of ten other candidates for beatification.

    https://www.catholicculture.org/news/headlines/index.cfm?storyid=39353

     

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