Author Topic: VALTORTA: 1,000+ discussion/ebook  (Read 1199 times)

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Offline Nandarani

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VALTORTA: 1,000+ discussion/ebook
« on: October 05, 2018, 12:51:09 PM »
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  • Perhaps all have an opinion maybe someone is like me - no opinion and just found out about it but tending negative.

    Finding Stephen Austin's pdf and seeing he is similar to me - in attitude anyway - in his progression - I am posting this.

    PDF:  A Summa and Encyclopedia to Maria Valtorta’s Extraordinary Work which is much too big to post here easily found.  The book itself can be read online, purchased, and below are pdfs:

    Archive.org:  https://archive.org/details/Volume1OfThePoemOfTheManGod/page/n0

    Emmerich, Blessed Maria of Agreda, and others are discussed in a section of this enormous pdf - the author compiler has everything hyperlinked, so there is no need to read cover to cover 1,300+ pages of e-book.  Just browse the contents, detailed in themselves - the TOC - for 'talking points' successively more and more amazing.

    Sampling the Archive.org material it does seem that this prodigious work is particularly suited to our time.  It was first translated into English from Italian in 1985.  

    The other revelations go to a different part of the mind and heart, in my experience, than Maria Valtorta's writings (over 4,000 typewritten pages written entirely by hand) will likely do in my case though the territory covered will be the same.

    So, for me, another book to be in the midst of.  It is all nectar of the highest degree, for me at my stage of development.

    Stephen Austin begins his 1,300+ page e-book:  the switch is significant and his work doesn't fail to explain it.

    'About five years ago, after reading and hearing some of the all-too-common misinformation and falsehoods about Maria Valtorta and her writings, I was convinced it was a false private revelation and I energetically began researching it and compiling information into an organized report to give to someone close to me to try to prove to them that Maria Valtorta’s writings were a false private revelation, forbidden by the Church, and should not be read. However, upon investigating Maria Valtorta and her writings in depth, and considering all the arguments both for and against it with a discerning, but open mind, I discovered my initial viewpoint was wrong, and I discovered that the evidence shows that her writings are not only free of error in faith and morals, and approved by a tremendous number of high-ranking, very learned, and trustworthy Church authorities, but that her writings are extraordinarily beneficial for souls and unlike any other book ever written.

    In my research, I was amazed at the massive amount of extraordinary proofs of the divine origin of her writings, proofs which rival the proofs of the greatest approved private revelations of the Church and put to shame the hundreds of false private revelations circulating around the world today. I began to realize that her writings are the most accurate, detailed, comprehensive, and powerful revelation about Jesus and Mary’s lives ever given to mankind. These writings have transformed my life. The tremendous impact these writings have had on multitudes of priests, religious, and lay faithful around the world is extraordinary. '

    Offline Ladislaus

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    Re: VALTORTA: 1,000+ discussion/ebook
    « Reply #1 on: October 05, 2018, 12:54:12 PM »
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  • He was right the first time.  Valtorta is bad news.  Among other things, it blasphemously implies homosexual affections between Our Lord and the Apostles.


    Offline JJkul

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    Re: VALTORTA: 1,000+ discussion/ebook
    « Reply #2 on: October 05, 2018, 02:38:50 PM »
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  • He was right the first time.  Valtorta is bad news.  Among other things, it blasphemously implies homosexual affections between Our Lord and the Apostles.


    While this was already linked on Cathinfo closer to the time it was published, the Dominicans of Avrillé have this to say about it:

    What should we make of the book The Poem of the Man God by Maria Valtorta?
    ____
    Joseph L.

    Offline Ladislaus

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    Re: VALTORTA: 1,000+ discussion/ebook
    « Reply #3 on: October 05, 2018, 03:46:27 PM »
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  • While this was already linked on Cathinfo closer to the time it was published, the Dominicans of Avrillé have this to say about it:

    What should we make of the book The Poem of the Man God by Maria Valtorta?

    Strangely, Bishop Williamson appears to approve of Valtorta, despite the fact that he normally eschews excessive emotionalism, and Valtorta just drips with emotionalism.  And sensuality.  Some of the descriptions of Our Lord kissing Apostles sensually on the lips and caressing them (especially St. John) ... comes across almost as homoerotic porn.

    Offline Avis

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    Re: VALTORTA: 1,000+ discussion/ebook
    « Reply #4 on: October 05, 2018, 03:49:55 PM »
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  • How tedious.

    As the original posts says Stephen Austin refutes all these lies and fallacies. Read what he writes or remain in your ignorance where you will rehash these lies. How sad that Catholics have so little interest in discovering the truth.


    Offline Ladislaus

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    Re: VALTORTA: 1,000+ discussion/ebook
    « Reply #5 on: October 05, 2018, 03:57:54 PM »
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  • Offline Ladislaus

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    Re: VALTORTA: 1,000+ discussion/ebook
    « Reply #6 on: October 05, 2018, 04:02:02 PM »
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  • Stephen Austin refutes all these lies and fallacies.

    :laugh1:

    Quote
    An Adult with homosexual tendencies 

    Valtorta’s Jesus suspiciously displays homosexual tendencies since he is constantly kissing and embracing the Apostles. When Jesus tells James of His approaching Passion, James reacts with great emotion. Jesus comforts him thus: 

    “’Come, I will kiss you thus, to help you forget the burden of My fate as Man. Here, I kiss your lips that will have to repeat My words to the people of Israel and your heart that will have to love as I told you, and there, on your temple, where life will cease.’ … They remain embraced for a long time and James seems to doze off in the joy of God's kisses that make him forget his suffering.” 

    When Valtorta describes the “favorite” Apostle John as having the face of a young girl with the “gaze of a lover,” we can hardly avoid having the impression that they have a homosexual relationship. Here Jesus is kissing John to awaken him: 

    “Jesus bends and kisses the cheek of John, who opens his eyes and is dumbfounded at seeing Jesus. He sits up and says, ‘Do you need me? Here I am.’ … 

    “John, half naked in his under-tunic, because he used his tunic and mantle as bed covers, clasps Jesus’ neck and lays his head between Jesus’ shoulder and cheek.” 

    After John professes his belief and love in Jesus as Son of God, “he smiles and weeps, panting, inflamed by his love, relaxing on Jesus’ chest, as if he were exhausted by his ardor. And Jesus caresses him, burning with love Himself.” 

    John begs Jesus not to tell the others of what has passed between them. Jesus replies, “Do not worry, John. No one will be aware of your wedding with the Love. Get dressed, come. We must leave.” (Vol. 2, n. 165, pp. 57-58) 

    Jesus suggests a love-affair between St. Peter and Our Lady 

    Jesus even jokes with impropriety with his apostles. Here, Jesus stands up and calls out loudly and angrily to Peter: 

    “‘Come here, you usurper and corrupter!’
    “‘Me? Why? What have I done, Lord?’
    “‘You have corrupted My Mother. That is why you wanted to be alone. What shall I do with you?’ 
    “Jesus smiles and Peter recovers his confidence. ‘You really frightened me! Now You are laughing.” (Vol. II, n. 199, p. 185) 

    Like Luther, Mary thinks: Let us sin to be forgiven 

    Some passages are tantamount to heresy. For example, Valtorta presents the child Mary as expressing her desire to be a big sinner in order to merit the grace of Redemption: 

    “[Mary]: ‘Tell Me, mummy, can one be a sinner out of love of God?
    “[Anne]: ‘What are you saying, my dear? I don't understand you.’
    “[Mary]:’I mean: to commit a sin in order to be loved by God, Who becomes the Savior. Who is lost, is saved. Isn’t that so? I would like to be saved by the Savior to receive His loving look." (Vol. 1, n. 7, p. 23). 

    A sensual Eve tending toward bestiality 

    The work is also not without doctrinal errors, such as when Valtorta asserts the sin of Eve was not disobedience, but a sexual act. There is also an insinuation of a tendency toward bestiality in Eve. This erotic description was supposedly made by Jesus: 

    “With his venomous tongue Satan blandished and caressed Eve’s limbs and eyes… Her flesh was aroused … The sensation is a sweet one for her. And ‘she understood.’ Now Malice was inside her and was gnawing at her intestines. She saw with new eyes and heard with new ears the habits and voices of beasts. And she craved for them with insane greed. “She began the sin by herself. She accomplished it with her companion.” (Vol. 1, n. 17, p. 49) 

    These are some excerpts I offer to my readers to evaluate Valtorta’s work. I believe they are sufficient for the reader to make a judgment of the whole. 


    Offline Avis

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    Re: VALTORTA: 1,000+ discussion/ebook
    « Reply #7 on: October 05, 2018, 04:14:54 PM »
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  • You repeat it but don't follow your own advice.

    It is pretty pathetic that you have to use a link to that vile pro capitalist website TIA, the remnant of a group condemned by Bishop de Castro-Meyer.

    If you want the truth and are man enough, then read what Stephen Austin writes or be prideful and stick to your own opinions ignoring the evidence.


    Offline hollingsworth

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    Re: VALTORTA: 1,000+ discussion/ebook
    « Reply #8 on: October 05, 2018, 05:41:12 PM »
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  • Quote
    If you want the truth and are man enough, then read what Stephen Austin writes or be prideful and stick to your own opinions ignoring the evidence.

    How about reading what Maria Valtorta herself writes, much less Austin?  I wonder how much of the Poem Lad has read.  For my part, my wife and I treat her books as inspired.  We have acquired and read them largely because of Bp. Williamson's high recommendation.  Valtorta was under the inspiration of the Holy Ghost, in our opinion.

    Offline klasG4e

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    Re: VALTORTA: 1,000+ discussion/ebook
    « Reply #9 on: October 06, 2018, 01:27:29 PM »
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  • http://www.dominicansavrille.us/what-should-we-make-of-the-book-the-poem-of-the-man-god-by-maria-valtorta-2/


    What should we make of the book The Poem of the Man God by Maria Valtorta?
    To answer to questions which were asked of us about Maria Valtorta, we publish here a text coming from Le Sel de la terre n° 7 (doctrinal review of the Dominicans of Avrillé).
    For more details, you can consult the book of Fr Herrbach: “Des visions sur l’Évangile” on the website: http://www.clovis-diffusion.com/
    Maria Valtorta died in 1961 “in an incomprehensible physical isolation” (in an insane asylum).
    Her principal work The Poem of the Man God, which was written in the years from 1943 to 1947, took up 10,000 pages of note-books.
    Her confessor Father Migliorini, claims to have been received in audience with Pope Pius XII alongside Father Berti, in February 1948 and the Pope is supposed to have said to them to publish this work, adding ” Whoever reads it, will understand“.  This oral authorisation of the Pope seems very unlikely: The Pope could only have given the authorisation of the work if he had read it and been assured of its orthodoxy; but how would the Pope have found the time to read these 10,000 pages?  This authorisation appears even less credible when the Holy Office forbade the work definitively (with no possible correction) one year later in February 1949.  The first four volumes were however published without Imprimatur from 1956 to 1959.  On the 16th of December 1959, the edited books were put on The Index [Editor: The Index of Forbidden Books].   The Osservatore Romano (official newspaper of the Vatican) published the placement on The Index accompanied with an article justifying the condemnation.  Here are some extracts:

    “The four Gospels present us with a Jesus humble and full of reserve; His speaking is sober, incisive but supremely efficacious.  On the contrary in this sort of romantic History [Editor:  i.e. The Poem of the Man God], Jesus is excessively loquacious and resembles a man of propaganda, always ready to proclaim Himself the Messiah and Son of God, and to give out lessons of theology, using the same terms that a professor of theology would use today.
    In the Gospel narratives, we admire the humility and the silence of the Mother of Jesus.  On the contrary for the author of this work, the most blessed Virgin Mary with the talkativeness of a modern lawyer, is always present everywhere and always ready to give lessons of Marian theology, perfectly up to date with the latest current studies of specialists on the matter…
    Some scenes are rather indecent and make us think of scenes from a modern novel.  We will only give a few examples, such as the confession made to Mary by a certain Aglae, a woman of ill-repute (1st volume, p.790 and after1);  the not very edifying narrative from pages 887 and onwards in the first volume;  a ballet executed in an immodest fashion before Pilate at the pretorium (volume 4, p. 75) etc…
    To finish let us point out another strange and imprecise affirmation where it is said of the Madonna, “You, all the time that you will be on this earth, you will be the second after Peter, in the ecclesiastical hierarchy. [It is we who underline, says the review]”
    Here are some examples of the errors and improprieties of this book
    • Our Lord thinks that words tire now and we must have recourse to visions… of Maria Valtorta; 
    • The tree of life in the terrestrial paradise is only a symbol; 
    • The sin of Adam and Eve consisted in the use of marriage in a spirit of lust; 
    • Saint Anne gave birth without pain; 
    • Our Lady brags of her humility and her calm; 
    • She says that she redeemed women through her maternity; 
    • She said that she saw God at her creation; 
    • Satan became flesh in the form of Judas.
    One can note numerous contradictions with the Gospel, for example:
    • Our Lord is supposed to have sucked with avidity the vinegar given by the soldier;
    • On the Cross Our Lord did not cease to cry out “Mommy!” and she replied: “Yes, my treasure, I am here”; 
    • Our Lady gets angry, cries out and becomes “almost” delirious after the death of her Son;
    • and this is not to mention the numerous sensualities which are spread throughout the work.
    Let us finish by citing a talk by Archbishop Lefebvre at a retreat, where he expresses his reserve regarding Maria Valtorta:
    Quote
    It is better for us […] not to spend too much time on the material details of the life of Our Lord. […] These books which present themselves as revelations of the Life of Our Lord, in my opinion, can be a danger, precisely because they represent Our Lord in a too concrete manner, too much in the details of His life.  I am thinking of course of Maria Valtorta.   And perhaps for some this reading can do good, it can bring them close to Our Lord, to try to imagine what would have been the life of the Apostles with Our Lord, the life at Nazareth, the life of Our Lord as the visits of the cities of Israel.
    But there is a danger, a great danger; that is to humanize too much, to concretize too much, and to not sufficiently show the face of God, in this Life of Our Lord.  This is the danger.  I do not know if we should recommend so much to people the reading of these books, if they are not forewarned.  I do not know if that would raise them up and make them know Our Lord, such as He was, such as He is, such as we should know Him and believe Him to be.2
    Last advice : Rather than read these novels where errors abound, it would be better to read Holy Scripture with good commentary based on the Fathers of the Church3, or even good lives of the saints4.
    (From Le Sel de la terre, n° 7)
    • These references correspond to the edition published at that time in Italian.
    • Retreat preached in september 1986, fourth instruction. Father Emily cites, at the end of his work, a part of this testimony, as well as an extract of a letter of Archbishop Lefebvre which goes along the same lines.
    • For example, The Great life of Jesus Christ, by Ludolphe le Chartreux or the commentaries of Bossuet.
    • The lives of the Saints, except in the case of a bad biography, make us remain in the real rather than depart into the imaginary, as is the case of these “visions” . The lives of Saints have what is needed to nourish the imagination, the heart and the intelligence of all Christians, even the most simple. Even today, one can find good illustrated lives of the saints.


    Offline Ladislaus

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    Re: VALTORTA: 1,000+ discussion/ebook
    « Reply #10 on: October 06, 2018, 03:18:15 PM »
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  • It is pretty pathetic that you have to use a link to that vile pro capitalist website TIA, the remnant of a group condemned by Bishop de Castro-Meyer.

    ^^^ [ad hominem]

    Are the citations not accurate?  They give the sources.


    Offline Ladislaus

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    Re: VALTORTA: 1,000+ discussion/ebook
    « Reply #11 on: October 06, 2018, 03:18:48 PM »
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  • For my part, my wife and I treat her books as inspired.

    :facepalm:

    Offline klasG4e

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    Re: VALTORTA: 1,000+ discussion/ebook
    « Reply #12 on: October 10, 2018, 10:30:54 AM »
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  •  For my part, my wife and I treat her books as inspired.  Valtorta was under the inspiration of the Holy Ghost, in our opinion.

    Who inspired the (novelty?) term Man-God (and for what reason)?  As far as I know, the traditional term has always been God-Man?

    Offline XavierSem

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    Re: VALTORTA: 1,000+ discussion/ebook
    « Reply #13 on: October 10, 2018, 12:46:27 PM »
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  • The two terms are equivalent. For e.g. Ven. Mary of Agreda uses them interchangeably in Mystical City of God: "In the second place, the angels were informed that God was to create a human nature and reasoning creatures lower than themselves, in order that they too should love, fear and reverence God, as their Author and eternal Good. They were informed that these were to stand in high favor, and that the second Person of the blessed Trinity was to become incarnate and assume their nature, raising it to the hypostatic union and to divine Personality; that therefore they were to acknowledge Him as their Head, not only as God, but as God and man, adoring Him and reverencing Him as God-man. Moreover, these same angels were to be His inferiors in dignity and grace and were to be His servants. God gave them an intelligence of the propriety and equity, of the justice and reasonableness of such a position. For the acceptation of the merits foreseen of this Man-God was exhibited to them as the source of the grace which they now possessed and of the glory which they were to obtain. They understood also that they themselves had been, and all the rest of the creatures should be created for His glory, and that He was to be their Head. All those that were capable of knowing and enjoying God, were to be the people of the Son of God, to know and reverence Him as their Chief. These commands were at once given to the angels."

    I know some traditionalists have objections/misunderstandings, but holy Maria Valtorta's work, The Poem of the Man-God is very much like Mary of Jesus', The Mystical City of God. That Bp. Williamson firmly supports it is well known. St. Pio once ordered one of his spiritual daughters to read the work, because it teaches, among other things, (1) That Mary our Mother is Co-Redemptrix with Christ and Mediatrix of All Graces and that (2) we too, like "victim souls" (Maria Valtorta was one, St. Pio of course was another), should all strive to make reparation and be channels of grace for others like Mary. St. Pio vouched for Maria Valtorta's genuine sanctity, and Maria Valtorta in turn (and not a coincidence these holy victim souls are frequently honored by the Mother of God with Her own name) very firmly supported the cause of St. Padre Pio even when the Friar of Pietrelcina had many unenlightened critics who thought him a fraud.

    Some sample testimonies: “Father, I have heard mention of Maria Valtorta’s books. Do you advise me to read them?” Padre Pio replied, “I don’t advise you to—I order you to!” http://www.bardstown.com/~brchrys/Padre-Pio-Valtorta.html That's quite the endorsement, isn't it? Bp. Williamson doesn't hesitate to say, "if I had a family to defend: [I would read] aloud each night to the children selected chapters from Maria Valtorta’s Poem of the Man-God. And when we had reached the end of the five volumes in English, I imagine us starting again from the beginning, and so on, until all the children had left home!" Can we not at least take a Gamaliel (the book records his conversion too! another issue known only to a few Christians, unlikely for Maria Valtorta to have invented) like neutral wait and see approach for now? Bp. Williamson is not one to make judgments like this on a whim: H.E. has even stated he would be willing to ordain any man to the Priesthood who has finished reading this work, because so many and so useful are the doctrines taught therein. 

    The work is more than 2000 pages long in pdf, most critics who have not read all of it (like Fr. Roschini etc have) zero in on one or two passages and interpret it in a wrong, carnal sense. When the Apostle of love himself in the Gospel states that he is the disciple whom Jesus loved, this is speaking above all of the mystical union of every Christian soul with Christ in the Holy Spirit. Certainly, the beloved Apostle reposed on the Sacred Heart, and was inflamed with love - we know as much from the Gospel and the epistles itself; this is to be understood in a spiritual sense, about divine Love, and intimacy with God. As regards the other argument, that Christ's Divinity is less in focus than His Humanity, I think that's not the case at all. Has anyone read how the Resurrection of Lazarus is described by Maria Valtorta? Very strong emphasis on His Divinity. 

    Pope Pius XII said, "Publish this work as it is. there is no need to give an opinion about its origin, whether it be extraordinary or not. Who reads it, will understand." See http://www.valtorta.org/the_poem_of_the_man_god_reviews_and_critiques.asp for other testimonies from learned and holy Catholic priests. Fr. Gabriel Roschini is considered by some to be the greatest Mariologist of the 20th century,professor at "Marianum", Pontifical Faculty of Theology in Rome, famous mariologist, author of 130 books, and advisor to the Holy Office. Father said, "I must candidly admit that the Mariology found in Maria Valtorta's writings, whether published or not, has been for me a real discovery. No other Marian writing, not even the sum total of all the writings I have read and studied were able to give me as clear, as lively, as complete, as luminous, or as fascinating an image, both simple and sublime, of Mary, God's masterpiece."

    Msgr. Ugo Lattanzi, dean of the Faculty of Theology of the Lateran Pontifical University, adviser to the Holy Office (1951)
    "The author could not have written such an abundant amount of material without being under the influence of a supernatural power." ... 

    Fr, Marco Giraudo, 0.P. Commissioner of the Holy Office in 1961, to Fr, Berti, representing the Order of the Servants of Mary, and made responsible for her writings by Maria Vallorta herself (1961)

    "You have our complete approval to continue the publication of this second edition of Valtorta's Poem of the Man-God" 
    Do make Acts of Consecration to the Twin Hearts, Spiritual Offerings of the Precious Blood of Jesus in Union with the Holy Mass, like in St. Gertrude's Chaplet, along with Spiritual Communions at least every hour. The Saints say Spiritual Communions are a way to quickly advance to Union with God.

    Offline XavierSem

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    Re: VALTORTA: 1,000+ discussion/ebook
    « Reply #14 on: October 10, 2018, 12:55:21 PM »
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  • The raising of Lazarus: Just a random passage from the life of Jesus which we already know of from the Gospels and on which the Poem of the Man-God allows us to enter into deeper contemplation and meditation. Let critics say what they want to say. I encourage others to read the work for themselves, forget about problematic passages for now if you will, read the ones that edify and increase your faith.

    Just posting an excerpt. The full passage can be read here: http://site.catholicxybr.com/main/3124/index.asp?pageid=123894&t=&newsid=19124

    Quote
    Martha asks in a low voice: «Master, do You want to go down there? If You do, torches will be required...» But she is wan at the thought of having to go down.
    Jesus does not reply to her. He raises His eyes to the sky, He stretches out His arms crosswise and prays in a very loud voice syllabising the words: «Father! I thank You for hearing Me. I knew that You always hear Me. But I said so for those who are present here, for the people surrounding Me, that they may believe in You, in Me, and that You have sent Me! »
    He remains thus for a moment and He becomes so transfigured that He seems to be enraptured, while without uttering any sound He says more secret words of prayer or adoration. I do not know. What I know is that He is so transhumanised that it is not possible to look at Him without feeling one's heart quiver. His body seems to become light, spiritualised, rising in height and also from the earth. Although the shades of His hair, eyes, complexion, garments remain unchanged ‑ contrary to what happened during the transfiguration on mount Tabor when everything became light and dazzling brightness ‑ He seems to shed light and that His whole body becomes light. Light seems to form a halo around Him, particularly round His face raised to the sky, certainly enraptured in the contemplation of His Father.
    He remains thus for some time, then He becomes Himself, the Man, but powerfully majestic. He proceeds as far as the threshold of the sepulchre. He moves His arms forward ‑ so far He had held them crosswise, the palms turned upwards ‑ now with palms turned downwards, so that His hands are already inside the hole of the sepulchre and their whiteness is outstanding in the darkness of the hole. His blue eyes are blazing and their flash forecasting a miracle is today unsustainable, in the silent darkness, and in a powerful voice and with a cry louder than the one He uttered on the lake when He ordered the wind to abate, in a voice that I never heard in any other miracle, He shouts: «Lazarus! Come out!» His voice is echoed by the sepulchral cave and coming out of it, it spreads all over the garden, it is repeated by the undulations of the ground of Bethany, I think it travels as far as the first hills beyond the fields and then comes back, repeated and subdued, like an order that cannot fail. It is certain that from numberless directions one can hear again: «out! out! out! »
    Everybody is thrilled with emotion and if curiosity rivets everyone in his place, faces grow pale and eyes are opened wide while mouths are closed involuntarily with cries of surprise already on their lips.
    Martha, a little behind and to one side, seems fascinated looking at Jesus. Mary, who has never moved away from the Master, falls on her knees at the entrance of the sepulchre, one hand on her breast to check her throbbing heart, the other holding the edge of Jesus' mantle unconsciously and convulsively, and one realises that she is trembling because the mantle is shaken lightly by the hand holding it.
    "Something white seems to emerge from the deep end of the sepulchre. At first it is just a short convex line, then it becomes oval-shaped, then wider and longer lines appear. And the dead body, enveloped in its bandages, comes slowly forward, becoming more visible, more mysterious and more awful.
    Jesus draws back, imperceptibly, but continuously, as the other moves forward. Thus the distance between the two is always the same.
    Mary is compelled to drop the edge of the mantle, but she does not move from where she is. Joy, emotion, everything, nail her to the place where she is.
    An «oh! » is uttered more and more clearly by the lips previously closed by the anxiety of suspense: from a whisper hardly distinguishable it changes into a voice, from a voice into a powerful cry.
    Lazarus is by now on the threshold of the sepulchre and he remains there rigid and silent, like a plaster statue just rough‑hewed, thus shapeless, a long thing, thin at the head and legs, thicker at the trunk, as macabre as death itself, ghost‑like in the white bandages against the dark background of the sepulchre. As the sun shines on him, putrid matter can be seen dripping already here and there from the bandages.
    Jesus shouts out in a loud voice: «Unbind him and let him go. Give him clothes and food.»
    «Master!...» says Martha, and perhaps she would like to say more, but Jesus stares at her subduing her with His bright eyes and He says: «Here! At once! Bring a garment. Dress him in the presence of all the people and give him something to eat.» He orders and never turns round to look at those who are behind and around Him. He looks only at Lazarus, at Mary who is near her resurrected brother, heedless of the disgust caused to everybody by the putrid bandages, and at Martha who is panting as if she felt her heart break and does not know whether she should shout for joy or weep...
    The servants rush to carry out the instructions. Naomi is the first to run away and to come back with garments folded on her arm. Some untie the bandages after rolling up their sleeves and tucking up their garments so that they may not touch the dripping rot. Marcella and Sarah come back with amphoras of perfumes followed by servants carrying basins and jugs of water steaming hot or trays with cups of milk, wine, fruit, honey‑cakes.
    The very long narrow bandages, which I think are of linen, with selvedge on each side, obviously woven for that purpose, unroll like rolls of tape from a reel and pile up on the ground, heavy with spices and pus. The servants move them to one side by means of sticks. They have started from the head, but even there there is matter that has certainly dripped from the nose, ears and mouth. The sudarium placed on the face is soaked with putrid matter and Lazarus' face, which is very pale and emaciated, with his eyes closed with the pomade placed in the eye‑sockets, with his hair and thin short beard sticking together, is soiled with it. The shroud placed round his body falls off slowly as the bandages are removed, freeing the trunk that they had enveloped for days, restoring a human figure to what they had previously transformed into something like a huge chrysalid. The bony shoulders, the emaciated arms, the ribs just covered with skin, the sunken stomach begin to appear slowly. And as the bandages fall off, the sisters, Maximinus, the servants busy themselves removing the first layer of dirt and balms and they insist continuously changing the water made detergent with spices, until the skin appears clean.
    "When they uncover Lazarus' face and he can look, he directs his gaze towards Jesus before looking at his sisters, and he seems absent‑minded and does not pay attention to what is happening while he looks at his Jesus with a loving smile on his lips and tears shining in his deep‑sunken eyes. Jesus also smiles at him, His eyes shining with tears, and without speaking He directs Lazarus' gaze towards the sky; Lazarus understands and moves his lips in silent prayer.
    Martha thinks that he wishes to say something but has no voice yet and she asks: «What are you saying to me, my Lazarus? »
    «Nothing, Martha. I was thanking the Most High.» His pronunciation is steady, his voice loud.
    The crowds utter an «oh! » of amazement once again.
    He has now been freed and cleaned down to his sides. And they can put on him his short tunic, a kind of a short shirt that reaches below his inguen falling on his thighs.
    They make him sit down to untie his legs and wash them. As soon as they appear Martha and Mary utter a loud cry pointing to the legs and bandages. And whilst on the bandages tied round the legs and on the shroud placed under the bandages the putrid matter is so copious as to stream down the cloth, the legs are completely healed. Only red cyanotic scars indicate the parts affected by gangrene.
    All the people shout their amazement more loudly; Jesus smiles and Lazarus smiles, too, looking for a moment at his healed legs, then he becomes engrossed again in looking at Jesus. He never seems to gratify his desire to see Him. The Judaeans, Pharisees, Sadducees, scribes, rabbis come forward cautiously in order not to contaminate their garments. They examine Lazarus closely. They examine Jesus closely. But neither Lazarus nor Jesus minds them. They look at each other and all the rest means nothing to them.
    They now put sandals on Lazarus' feet and he stands up, agile and steady. He takes the tunic that Martha hands him, he puts it on by himself, he fastens his belt and adjusts the fold of the garment. And there he is, lean and pale, but like everybody else. He washes again his hands and arms as far as his elbows, after tucking up his sleeves. And with clean water he washes his face and head again, until he feels that he is thoroughly clean. He dries his hair and face, hands the towel to the servant and goes straight towards Jesus. He prostrates himself. He kisses His feet.
    Jesus bends, lifts him up, presses him to His heart saying: «Welcome back home, My dear friend. May peace and joy be with you. Live to accomplish your happy destiny. Raise your face that I may greet you with a kiss.» And He kisses Lazarus' cheeks and is kissed by him.
    Only after worshipping and kissing the Master, Lazarus speaks to his sisters and kisses them; he then kisses Maximinus and Naomi, who are weeping for joy, and some of those who I think are related to the family or are very close friends. He then kisses Joseph, Nicodemus, Simon Zealot and a few more.
    Jesus goes personally towards a servant who is carrying a tray on which there is some food and He takes a honey‑cake, an apple, a goblet of wine, and He offers them to Lazarus, after offering and blessing them, so that he may nourish himself. And Lazarus eats with the healthy appetite of one who is well. A further «oh! » of amazement is uttered by the crowd.
    Jesus seems to see no one but Lazarus, but in actual fact He observes everything and everybody and when He sees with what furious gestures Sadoc, Helkai, Hananiah, Felix, Doras and Cornelius and others are about to go away, He says in a loud voice: «Wait a moment, Sadoc. I want to have a word with you, with you and your friends.»
    They stop with the sinister look of criminals.
    Joseph of Arimathea makes a gesture as if he were frightened and beckons to the Zealot to restrain Jesus. But He is already going towards the rancorous group and is already saying loud: «Sadoc, is what you have seen enough for you? One day you told Me that in order to believe, you and your peers needed to see a decomposed dead body be recomposed and in good health. Are you satisfied with the rottenness you have seen? Can you admit that Lazarus was dead and that now he is alive and healthy, as he has never been for many years? I know. You came here to tempt these people, to increase their grief and their doubt. You came here looking for Me, hoping to find Me hiding in the room of the dying man. You did not come with feelings of love and with the desire to honour the deceased man, but to ensure that Lazarus was really dead, and you have continued to come rejoicing all the more as time went by. If the situation had evolved as you were hoping, as you believed it would evolve, you would have been right in exulting. The Friend Who cures everybody, but does not cure His friend. The Master Who rewards everybody's faith, but not the faith of His friends in Bethany. The Messiah powerless against the reality of death. That is what was making you exult. Then God gave you His reply. No prophet had ever been able to put together what was decomposed, in addition to being dead. God did it. That is the living witness of what I am. One day it was God Who took some dust and made it into a form and He breathed the vital spirit into it and man was. I was there to say: "Let man be made in our own image and likeness". Because I am the Word of the Father. Today, I, the Word, said to what is even less than dust, I said to rottenness: "Live", and decomposition was recomposed into flesh, into wholesome, living, breathing flesh. There it is looking at you. And to the flesh I joined the spirit that had been lying for days in Abraham's bosom. I called him with My will, because I can do everything, as I am the Living Being, the King of kings to Whom all creatures and things are subject. What are you going to reply to Me now? »
    He is in front of them, tall, ablaze with majesty, really Judge and God. They do not reply.
    Do make Acts of Consecration to the Twin Hearts, Spiritual Offerings of the Precious Blood of Jesus in Union with the Holy Mass, like in St. Gertrude's Chaplet, along with Spiritual Communions at least every hour. The Saints say Spiritual Communions are a way to quickly advance to Union with God.

     

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