Author Topic: How Marriage Became One of the Sacraments: The Sacramental Theology of Marriage  (Read 810 times)

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Offline Geremia

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Philip Reynolds, How Marriage Became One of the Sacraments: The Sacramental Theology of Marriage from Its Medieval Origins to the Council of Trent, Cambridge Studies in Law and Christianity 6 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2016).



Among the contributions of the medieval church to western culture was the idea that marriage was one of the seven sacraments, which defined the role of married folk in the church. Although it had ancient roots, this new way of regarding marriage raised many problems, to which scholastic theologians applied all their ingenuity. By the late Middle Ages, the doctrine was fully established in Christian thought and practice but not yet as dogma. In the sixteenth century, with the entire Catholic teaching on marriage and celibacy and its associated law and jurisdiction under attack by the Protestant reformers, the Council of Trent defined the doctrine as a dogma of faith for the first time but made major changes to it. Rather than focusing on a particular aspect of intellectual and institutional developments, this book examines them in depth and in detail from their ancient precedents to the Council of Trent.

**

Book Description

An indispensable guide to how marriage acquired the status of a sacrament. This book analyzes in detail how medieval theologians explained the place of matrimony in the church and her law, and how the bitter debates of the sixteenth century elevated the doctrine to a dogma of the Catholic faith.

About the Author

Philip Reynolds has taught at Emory University, Atlanta since 1992, where he is Aquinas Professor of Historical Theology. He is also a senior fellow of Emory's Center for the Study of Law and Religion (CSLR), and he directed CSLR's five-year project on The Pursuit of Happiness (2006-11).
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Offline Geremia

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Offline Geremia

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Offline budDude

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Its a Sacrament, but also a secular contract used by Judeo Freemasonic judges to punish men especially in no fault divorce states like my own if and when she tires of you or finds another.
I would never apply for a state marriage license.  Common Law or Church ceremony with NO contract.
Judge Goldstein if hes having a bad day gets to split half of your assets, issue court ordered alimony & Child support.
Miss a Payment + Go to Jail.
Dont think that processing screw ups occur?  Ask me about it sometime. Lucky to escape jail.. My payments were ahead of time, ever time.


Offline JezusDeKoning

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Its a Sacrament, but also a secular contract used by Judeo Freemasonic judges to punish men especially in no fault divorce states like my own if and when she tires of you or finds another.
I would never apply for a state marriage license.  Common Law or Church ceremony with NO contract.
Judge Goldstein if hes having a bad day gets to split half of your assets, issue court ordered alimony & Child support.
Miss a Payment + Go to Jail.
Dont think that processing screw ups occur?  Ask me about it sometime. Lucky to escape jail.. My payments were ahead of time, ever time.
You do realize three things, right:
A) 99.9999999% of all Catholic priests would not conduct the ceremony without the marriage license
B) you would not be considered legally next of kin if something happened
C) marriage is for life, and the onus is on HER to realize that, not some random Jewish judge
There is a God, but there probably is no Pope Francis.


Offline Nadir

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You do realize three things, right:
A) 99.9999999% of all Catholic priests would not conduct the ceremony without the marriage license
B) you would not be considered legally next of kin if something happened
C) marriage is for life, and the onus is on HER to realize that, not some random Jewish judge
I do not understand what B) means, but you're wrong on A). I even had to do a websearch for what is a marriage licence. I don't know anybody who had to have a marriage licence to marry. It seems to be an American thing, not a Catholic thing.

Offline JezusDeKoning

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I do not understand what B) means, but you're wrong on A). I even had to do a websearch for what is a marriage licence. I don't know anybody who had to have a marriage licence to marry. It seems to be an American thing, not a Catholic thing.
Yes, it is very, very much an American thing. 
There is a God, but there probably is no Pope Francis.

Offline RoughAshlar

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I do not understand what B) means, but you're wrong on A). I even had to do a websearch for what is a marriage licence. I don't know anybody who had to have a marriage licence to marry. It seems to be an American thing, not a Catholic thing.
Yes, it is very, very much an American thing. 

Not quite, it originated in different European countries varying from the 12th to the 16th century.  They were originally issued by the Church.  Regular license if you were to be married in your Church, and a special license by the bishop if you were to married in another Church other than your own...Say the Basilica or Cathedral, or parish in another town, etc.  This didn't start out being an American thing.


Offline budDude

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You do realize three things, right:
A) 99.9999999% of all Catholic priests would not conduct the ceremony without the marriage license
B) you would not be considered legally next of kin if something happened
C) marriage is for life, and the onus is on HER to realize that, not some random Jewish judge
Therein Lies The Problem.   You literally pay the state and invite them INTO your affairs.  They should have NO Business in said affairs.
You Still dont get it, though.  The ONUS is On the man, at that divorce court proceeding, with said random judge deciding his fate and his financial ruin.  The woman reaps the harvest.  Even in marriages where she outearns her male husband, she gets alimony.

Next of kin concern?
There is something called Common Law marriage.  It derives from Old English Law.  It is still done today though not nearly as much as it should be. So actually you are wrong. YOU would be considered Next of Kin If something were to befall your spouse in that instance with no wedding LICENSE.  Most of you are content to be slaves, not even knowing that you are enslaved.  So sad

Offline budDude

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Yes, it is very, very much an American thing.
NO, it is NOT Unless one lives in a 3rd world craphole.
The state controls every aspect of a man today and his property, including His wife.
 Yes, I said it. 
Property defined-  That which is proper to a man.  Wife falls into that category.

Offline Nadir

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  • Not quite, it originated in different European countries varying from the 12th to the 16th century.  They were originally issued by the Church.  Regular license if you were to be married in your Church, and a special license by the bishop if you were to married in another Church other than your own...Say the Basilica or Cathedral, or parish in another town, etc.  This didn't start out being an American thing.
     
    JDeK was referring to the 99.9999999% of all Catholic priests who won't marry you without a licence. My point is that this is an American and not a Catholic thing. The Church does not require it. 
    Some people here (I am not referring to JDeK here) confuse  America with the world (I mean the physical world)


    Offline Irish_Catholic

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  • There is something called Common Law marriage.  It derives from Old English Law.  It is still done today though not nearly as much as it should be. So actually you are wrong. YOU would be considered Next of Kin If something were to befall your spouse in that instance with no wedding LICENSE.  Most of you are content to be slaves, not even knowing that you are enslaved.  So sad
    Not in the UK or Ireland, there's not.
    Just last week I read a report on the difficulties faced by the surviving partner after a death, when they thought they had a 'common law marriage.' The surviving partner has no rights to property, pensions, bank accounts etc unless they are in joint names or there is a will naming them as recipient.
    The idea of 'common law' marriage actually came from the church in medieval times. Many couples lived together as man & wife after a simple betrothal / promise ceremony followed by consummation - without going through the sacrament of marriage. It was considered just as valid as a formal marriage. Indeed, several times it led to the dis-inheriting of a monarch when it was found that one of their parents had a common-law wife prior to marrying the queen, which meant that their children were illegitimate. (e.g. - Edward V was set aside in favour of Richard III because it was said Edward IV had been pre-contracted to Eleanor Butler prior to marrying Elizabeth Woodville, making his marriage to Queen Elizabeth bigamous).
    Pre-contract common-law marriages were done away with in England at the time of the reformation. Whether they still exist anywhere else I don't know.
    Parliament in Westminster is considering changing the law to give rights to co-habiting couples who think they are in a common law marriage, because such a thing no longer exists.
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    Offline Nadir

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  • A marriage licence exists outside of the marriage. It is not a proof of marriage. It is merely a document saying that the couple have a possibility and a right to be married. You could have had several licences and never have married. You are confusing a licence with a marriage certificate which is only issued after the marriage.

    Common law marriage is a marriage that does not have the blessing of the Church nor the recognition of the state in normal circumstances. Marriage is by its very nature a public act which accepted as such by the community.

    Offline budDude

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  • Not in the UK or Ireland, there's not.
    Just last week I read a report on the difficulties faced by the surviving partner after a death, when they thought they had a 'common law marriage.' The surviving partner has no rights to property, pensions, bank accounts etc unless they are in joint names or there is a will naming them as recipient.
    The idea of 'common law' marriage actually came from the church in medieval times. Many couples lived together as man & wife after a simple betrothal / promise ceremony followed by consummation - without going through the sacrament of marriage. It was considered just as valid as a formal marriage. Indeed, several times it led to the dis-inheriting of a monarch when it was found that one of their parents had a common-law wife prior to marrying the queen, which meant that their children were illegitimate. (e.g. - Edward V was set aside in favour of Richard III because it was said Edward IV had been pre-contracted to Eleanor Butler prior to marrying Elizabeth Woodville, making his marriage to Queen Elizabeth bigamous).
    Pre-contract common-law marriages were done away with in England at the time of the reformation. Whether they still exist anywhere else I don't know.
    Parliament in Westminster is considering changing the law to give rights to co-habiting couples who think they are in a common law marriage, because such a thing no longer exists.
    The Only reason you 'hear' of those so called difficulties, is so people dont follow suit.  Its bad for the legal system, the state, judges and society deep state as it exists now, if people learn they are slaves, and do not assert their rights.
    Common Law Joint Bank account- is not hard to do for heaven sake.  Nor is a pension- there are survivor rights names right on the document. Property- simply add one to a quit claim deed pr put one on title.  None of this is hard or complicated.
    Common Law marriages still exist.  Though not in great number.

     

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