Author Topic: Catholic Poems  (Read 4580 times)

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Offline MyrrhTree

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Catholic Poems
« on: October 26, 2015, 06:52:59 PM »
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  • Hi everyone^^

    Just wanted to share these beautiful, Catholic poems with you. I hope you enjoy them as much as I did :popcorn: I wish you all the best<3  

    http://www.poetrysoup.com/famous/poems/catholic

    Yours in Christ,
    MyrrhTree
    "God is Love, and those who live in love live in God and God lives in them" 1 Jn 4:16

    Offline Patrick JK Gray

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    « Reply #1 on: October 27, 2015, 04:00:37 AM »
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  • I am sorry, these are not Catholic. A look at certain of the authors suffices:

    Byron -- an adulterer and moral pervert, notorious for impurity.
    Angelou -- a grossly immoral life, associated with the Civil Rights Movement and our Masonic elite.
    Chaucer -- a good deal of his work is impure
    Longfellow -- not a Catholic.
    Smart -- a Protestant heretic.
    Tebb -- not a Catholic either. Associated with hippies.
    Lowell -- an apostate and adulterer.
    Brautigan -- a 'Post-Modernist', a fornicator, a suicide.
    Milosz -- a leftist, ''anti-Polish, anti-Catholic, and had signed a petition supporting gay and lesbian freedom of speech and assembly.''
    Ginsberg -- a Jew and a moral pervert.
    Levine -- a Jew, perhaps an adulterer.
    Aldington -- A Socialist associated with moral degenerates, an adulterer.
    Goethe -- a notorious Rationalist and free-thinker, writer of evil books.

    I have not included others for lack of time. It's not nice work (I looked up the names) but it is necessary. A good many are 'Romantics' (a vile movement stating that the vile passions and emotions  are good) or Modernists. In either case, all stand for the destruction of Catholic culture.

    I have no reason to think you are insincere, but please, Myrrh-Tree, keep away from 'culture'! This world has been a worsening cesspool since Luther's time and there have been men of wicked life since Cain. There have always been wicked degenerates.

    I recommend the hymns of Father Frederick Faber as good Catholic verse.
    Let nothing fret you
    Nothing upset you
    Everything falters
    God never alters
    Patience withal
    Will obtain all.
    Who to God will cling
    Can lack for no thing.
    God alone suffices!


    Sacred Heart of Jesus, I put in you all the trust I can lay my h


    Offline rum

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    « Reply #2 on: October 27, 2015, 05:28:56 AM »
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  • It's good to be informed about that, Patrick. I think I'm infected with Romanticism. I have a hard time staying away from popular music (particularly stuff from the 60s), which I grew up on.

    I'm curious, as someone who isn't knowledgeable about poetry, what other poets you'd recommend.

    Offline Patrick JK Gray

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    « Reply #3 on: October 27, 2015, 05:56:22 AM »
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  • Nor am I, but I was very wicked in my early teens and pretended to read a little of the 'theory' of the various degenerate literary movements. Two very interesting essays by Bishop Williamson on Romanticism:

    http://truerestoration.blogspot.co.uk/2008/09/poetry-project-i-ozymandias-by-pb.html
    truerestoration.blogspot.co.uk/2008/11/poetry-project-ii-ode-on-grecian-urn-by.html

    Bishop Williamson can evidently read them safely and comment on their errors. I am weaker in mind and readily moved by the impure sentiments of the Romantics and am apt to keep clear.

    I'm wary of recommending poetry lest I merely stir up emotions and passions rather than lifting the soul to God. I'm trying to go on holy verse, which is more often sung than read.

    These are merely things I like or find helpful. Fr Faber wrote very good hymns, yes. St Therese of Lisieux wrote holy verse as well, I have a few in a book called St Therese of Lisieux by Canon T.N. Taylor. The Breviary hymns (the Vespers and Compline ones). Psalm 90. The hymns of the Little Office of the Immaculate Conception.

    As a little child I can remember 'Macavity the Mystery Cat' (T.S. Eliot),
    Let nothing fret you
    Nothing upset you
    Everything falters
    God never alters
    Patience withal
    Will obtain all.
    Who to God will cling
    Can lack for no thing.
    God alone suffices!


    Sacred Heart of Jesus, I put in you all the trust I can lay my h

    Offline Patrick JK Gray

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    « Reply #4 on: October 27, 2015, 06:14:44 AM »
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  • The last is a comic poem for children (alluding to the sinful Sherlock Holmes books). I ought not have included it. I was going to mention some more, but frivolity is sinful.
    Let nothing fret you
    Nothing upset you
    Everything falters
    God never alters
    Patience withal
    Will obtain all.
    Who to God will cling
    Can lack for no thing.
    God alone suffices!


    Sacred Heart of Jesus, I put in you all the trust I can lay my h


    Offline AMDGJMJ

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    « Reply #5 on: October 27, 2015, 07:36:44 PM »
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  • Quote from: rum
    It's good to be informed about that, Patrick. I think I'm infected with Romanticism. I have a hard time staying away from popular music (particularly stuff from the 60s), which I grew up on.

    I'm curious, as someone who isn't knowledgeable about poetry, what other poets you'd recommend.


    It is sometimes hard to find good poetry, but it is out there.  

    Father Faber and Joyce Kilmer are a couple of my favorites, and they were COMPLETE Catholics!

    Some of my favorites of their poems are here:

    http://catholicpoemsandstories.blogspot.com/

    "Jesus, Meek and Humble of Heart, make my heart like unto Thine!"

    http://whoshallfindavaliantwoman.blogspot.com/

    Offline MyrrhTree

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    « Reply #6 on: October 28, 2015, 11:23:24 AM »
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  • To everyone here, I am so sorry if the poems caused any offense. Patrick, you are right. Some of these poems are not written by catholics, like g.k chesterton.

    Some of these poems were picked because of their associating catholicism either with significant historical events or through differing points of view.

    The later can be controversial, especially on a traditional catholic forum, and I should have known better and clarified in my original post. I think it was just late when I wrote it, and I wasn’t thinking. To the administrators, please feel free to remove my post.

    I just felt, from reading some of these poems for the first time, it helped to strengthen my catholic views. It was not because they were written by the blessed saints or expressed catholic doctrine, but because some of them were written by non-believers who view catholicism in a bad light because of ignorance.

    Just reading them made me think, “You’re wrong, poor man, and here’s why!” So, for me at least, some of these poems helped me confirm my catholic faith just in a different way. I also recognize that not everyone is the same as me and apologize again. I am so sorry. I suppose I’m still very new to the forum and traditional catholicism in general. I hope some of you will understand.


    Here are some of my all time favorite poems written by St. Theresa of Lisieux. I hope everyone enjoys these^ ^

    http://catholicfirst.com/thefaith/catholicclassics/sttherese/poemsofsttherese01.html


    *hugs*
    MyrrhTree
    "God is Love, and those who live in love live in God and God lives in them" 1 Jn 4:16

    Offline claudel

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    « Reply #7 on: October 28, 2015, 12:03:48 PM »
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  • As hopeless as it may be to make this request, I sincerely call upon commenters on this thread to consider whether their knee-jerk embrace of the reflexive censoriousness of at least a hefty minority—perhaps even a majority—of CI members toward literature and the fine arts is wise or even Catholic. Literally nothing in the history of orthodox catechesis can be found to support the sweeping, benighted claims made on this thread by Mr. Gray and others. Inability to understand or enjoy the fine arts is one thing (however unfortunate it is, it has been the condition of the great mass of mankind throughout the ages), but to judge and find wanting an entire aspect of human history on an utterly irrational and distorted basis—i.e., that the private lives of the writers or artists fail to meet the "authority's" standards of moral conduct or doctrinal orthodoxy—is quite another thing, indeed a lamentable and disgraceful thing.

    Put otherwise, closed-mindedness, especially when it stems from pig ignorance, is not a virtue, nor has the development and refinement of a sensitivity and openness to arts and letters ever been adjudged a universal bar to the attainment of sanctity or hence to salvation. On the contrary, John Bosco is not the only saint, merely a widely known recent examplar, who has lauded literature and the arts for their capacity to cultivate the soil of human sensibility so as to make it more receptive to God's grace. Anyone who thinks, for example, that the saint couldn't possibly have loved Verdi's music had he had an inkling of Verdi's fierce anticlericalism or his highly irregular private life needs to do some reading. Of course, there is a simpler path: just call John Bosco and several dozen earlier saints protomodernists and cross their names out of one's personally approved canon!

    In closing and summary, I say this: nothing at CI over the past four or five years has disheartened me more than reading the ignorant and puritanical (hence presumptively heretical) comments from scores of commenters about literature (poetry especially), music (real music), and the representational arts, which have been central components of every worthwhile civilization in recorded history. One need not be a saint or a scholar to understand that, whether by design or circumstance, the life of the typical man or woman contains little that is uplifting, joy-giving, and capable of exercising the mental and emotional attributes which God Himself has given to every creature and which (cf. the Parable of the Talents) man scorns only at his peril. So why jump up in delight and in support of the uninformed counsel of more or less anonymous commenters in preference to that of orthodox saints and scholars and of such a living figure of ecclesial authority as Bishop Williamson?

    The miseries of human life are earnest and grave things. Since Christ's time it has been the hope of Christians that patient endurance of these miseries will bring heaven as the reward. But it should never be forgotten that these miseries are defects and ills, not things to be desired for their own sake. Not every thing that lessens their weight is to be adjudged a good, of course, but the contrary attitude, exemplified by this thread, is far, far less to be approved.


    Offline Ladislaus

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    « Reply #8 on: October 28, 2015, 01:15:53 PM »
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  • Only 8 more posts to go.

    Offline Patrick JK Gray

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    « Reply #9 on: October 28, 2015, 03:52:32 PM »
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  • Quote from: claudel
    As hopeless as it may be to make this request, I sincerely call upon commenters on this thread to consider whether their knee-jerk embrace of the reflexive censoriousness of at least a hefty minority—perhaps even a majority—of CI members toward literature and the fine arts is wise or even Catholic. Literally nothing in the history of orthodox catechesis can be found to support the sweeping, benighted claims made on this thread by Mr. Gray and others. Inability to understand or enjoy the fine arts is one thing (however unfortunate it is, it has been the condition of the great mass of mankind throughout the ages), but to judge and find wanting an entire aspect of human history on an utterly irrational and distorted basis—i.e., that the private lives of the writers or artists fail to meet the "authority's" standards of moral conduct or doctrinal orthodoxy—is quite another thing, indeed a lamentable and disgraceful thing.

    Put otherwise, closed-mindedness, especially when it stems from pig ignorance, is not a virtue, nor has the development and refinement of a sensitivity and openness to arts and letters ever been adjudged a universal bar to the attainment of sanctity or hence to salvation. On the contrary, John Bosco is not the only saint, merely a widely known recent examplar, who has lauded literature and the arts for their capacity to cultivate the soil of human sensibility so as to make it more receptive to God's grace. Anyone who thinks, for example, that the saint couldn't possibly have loved Verdi's music had he had an inkling of Verdi's fierce anticlericalism or his highly irregular private life needs to do some reading. Of course, there is a simpler path: just call John Bosco and several dozen earlier saints protomodernists and cross their names out of one's personally approved canon!

    In closing and summary, I say this: nothing at CI over the past four or five years has disheartened me more than reading the ignorant and puritanical (hence presumptively heretical) comments from scores of commenters about literature (poetry especially), music (real music), and the representational arts, which have been central components of every worthwhile civilization in recorded history. One need not be a saint or a scholar to understand that, whether by design or circumstance, the life of the typical man or woman contains little that is uplifting, joy-giving, and capable of exercising the mental and emotional attributes which God Himself has given to every creature and which (cf. the Parable of the Talents) man scorns only at his peril. So why jump up in delight and in support of the uninformed counsel of more or less anonymous commenters in preference to that of orthodox saints and scholars and of such a living figure of ecclesial authority as Bishop Williamson?

    The miseries of human life are earnest and grave things. Since Christ's time it has been the hope of Christians that patient endurance of these miseries will bring heaven as the reward. But it should never be forgotten that these miseries are defects and ills, not things to be desired for their own sake. Not every thing that lessens their weight is to be adjudged a good, of course, but the contrary attitude, exemplified by this thread, is far, far less to be approved.


    I'm quite ready to concede veering to Jansenism or Puritanism, it has been pointed out before, if it can be proved. Are you saying that the works should be examined by a competent authority and if found pure (e.g. Schumann's piano pieces played instrumentally (without lyrics), which are very nice and have Bishop Williamson's approval if the pack of lies in Der Spiegel managed to tell the truth once: http://www.spiegel.de/international/germany/embarrassment-for-the-catholic-church-bishop-williamson-unrepentent-in-holocaust-denial-a-675163-2.html) they can be used as recreation by a Catholic irrelevant of the moral purity (Schumann was another Romantic and treated a lady he was engaged to abominably) of the author?

    It seems foolish to me to freely read or listen to authors of immoral life lest there is any corruption ('one scabby sheep infects the whole flock', so an immoral life might taint works).
    Let nothing fret you
    Nothing upset you
    Everything falters
    God never alters
    Patience withal
    Will obtain all.
    Who to God will cling
    Can lack for no thing.
    God alone suffices!


    Sacred Heart of Jesus, I put in you all the trust I can lay my h

    Offline MyrrhTree

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    « Reply #10 on: October 28, 2015, 05:14:34 PM »
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  • @Claudel: Hello! Thank you so much for your very thoughtful and kind response. It means so much<3

    @Patrick: Again, I want to apologize that the poems caused offense. If I may, you said, "'one scabby sheep infects the whole flock', so an immoral life might taint works."

    This may be true but did Christ not come and be sacrificed for the ignorant sinners? He may have shunned their sins but never the sinners.

    What if He shunned St. Mary Magdalene, and her example has spoken so much to me of Christ's love and compassion? Are we not meant to imitate Christ and welcome the Magdalenes of the world?

    What you say is true in that we should never condone bad art, literature, etc., but it's also important to understand it for the sake of evangelizing the non-believers.

    Where there is ignorance, we can instill truth through Christ. I truly believe this with all my heart. Christ is our light and our armor; we needn't be afraid to venture into the lion's den for His sake as long as we stay true to Him.

    I'm still learning and, thus, would never presume to know more than any of you, but I'm sure our beloved Lord would never want conflict among His little sheep<3

    Thank you for all your comments!
    "God is Love, and those who live in love live in God and God lives in them" 1 Jn 4:16


    Offline AMDGJMJ

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    « Reply #11 on: October 28, 2015, 06:55:36 PM »
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  • MyrrhTree,

    You certainly don't need to apologize for the link.  It was a good one to have!

    Not every poem has to be written by a Catholic to be inspiring.

    Interesting to note is that G.K. Chesterton did convert and become a Catholic in the end...

    H. Belloc was a very solid Catholic, and his poems are on the site you quoted...

    Oh, and you know what is funny?  I actually came across the same site you mentioned a few days before you posted it, and some of the poems really helped me through a tough time.

    Thanks for sharing it, and keep fighting the good fight!

    May God bless you!

    Rita
    "Jesus, Meek and Humble of Heart, make my heart like unto Thine!"

    http://whoshallfindavaliantwoman.blogspot.com/

    Offline rum

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    « Reply #12 on: October 29, 2015, 01:25:04 AM »
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  • Claudel, do you like any of the poets Patrick JK Gray mentioned (Byron, Angelou, Chaucer, Longfellow, Smart, Tebb, Lowell, Brautigan, Milosz, Ginsberg, Levine, Aldington, Goethe)?

    Who are some of your favorite poets?

    Offline Patrick JK Gray

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    « Reply #13 on: October 29, 2015, 03:08:58 AM »
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  • Rum: you seem a shrewd fellow with a very good grip on the modern world. If I may 'don't be hasty'. I stand by my condemnations unless claudel can prove I erred and I think writing is much more dangerous than music. Whatever you do, don't go reading wicked poets, unchecked by a good authority, and endangering your soul!
    Let nothing fret you
    Nothing upset you
    Everything falters
    God never alters
    Patience withal
    Will obtain all.
    Who to God will cling
    Can lack for no thing.
    God alone suffices!


    Sacred Heart of Jesus, I put in you all the trust I can lay my h

    Offline MyrrhTree

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    « Reply #14 on: October 29, 2015, 09:22:24 PM »
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  • Hi AMDGJMJ!

    Thank you so much for your kind words. I too find inspiration and even comfort from poetry.

    I read the poems you recommended on your link and they are truly inspirational and beautiful. They not only appealed to me as a Catholic but also as a woman.

    There were some poems under the title "My Poems." Did you happen to write these yourself?

    I can't say I have a favorite among them, because they all are very meaningful, but if I had to pick one to post here it would be this one: http://catholicpoemsandstories.blogspot.com/2015/07/mater-dolorosa_5.html

    If you did write this poem and the others, please let us know here. I would love to purchase a copy if they've been published^ ^

    Again, thanks so much and God bless
     



    "God is Love, and those who live in love live in God and God lives in them" 1 Jn 4:16

     

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