Author Topic: Book: The Heart of Jesus of Nazareth: Meditations on the Hidden Life  (Read 435 times)

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Offline trad123

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  • The Heart of Jesus of Nazareth: Meditations on the Hidden Life


    https://archive.org/details/HeartOfJesusOfNazareth/page/n7/mode/2up


    http://catholicsaints.mobi/ebooks/hojon/toc.htm



    Quote
    Tenth Mediation

    (. . .)

    He saw every sin that every soul ever had committed, or should commit until the end of time. He beheld them in all their malice, in all their foulness, in all their heartlessness, in all their terrible consequences for time and for eternity. The thought of them was ever present to His mind; the anguish which they caused Him was ever lying on His Heart. He knew them, not in general, as we know them, but each detail was revealed to Him, and aggravated His sufferings.

    As He silently toiled in the House of Nazareth, His gaze traveled far beyond the horizon that bounded His outward view, and laid bare before Him all the crimes even at that moment being committed, and the countless souls rushing on to the abyss. He saw the hearts for which He thirsted growing cold and estranged from Him, and consequently forfeiting the special graces He had destined for them - the beautiful thrones He had already purchased by His toil and His sweat and His tears. He saw His own eternal love placed in the balance with that of some pitiful creature, nay, even the latter preferred and Himself rejected. How truly applicable then are the words of David to the Heart of Jesus when suffering in the solitude of Nazareth as Saviour of men: "My sorrow is always before Me."

    And while our thoughts are engrossed by the most puerile interests, if not by something worse, how many of our fellow-men are rushing on to the precipice which must be their eternal ruin. Oh! how different our lives would be, how much more real, more earnest, more devoted and self-sacrificing, if the sources of the sorrow of the Sacred Heart were more familiar to us, if the thought recurred to us, not once in a way, but habitually:

    At this moment souls are rejecting the last grace, a step which will lead to their eternal reprobation; while others are on the verge of committing the last sin destined to fill up the measure of their iniquity and bind them down to be the slaves of Satan for ever.

    At this moment Heaven, salvation itself, all are being forfeited eternally, and I might perhaps co-operate in averting this eternal evil, this endless misery, by an earnest appeal to the Heart of Jesus, by a fervent aspiration, by some slight sacrifice made with a wholly unselfish view to the saving of souls.

    (. . .)


    2 Corinthians 4:3-4

    And if our gospel be also hid, it is hid to them that are lost, In whom the god of this world hath blinded the minds of unbelievers, that the light of the gospel of the glory of Christ, who is the image of God, should not shine unto them.

    Offline trad123

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    Re: Book: The Heart of Jesus of Nazareth: Meditations on the Hidden Life
    « Reply #1 on: January 15, 2021, 08:04:48 AM »
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  • Sixth Mediation

    (. . .)

    Behold the first great Master of the Divine Apostleship. Behold in Jesus of Nazareth the first apostle of prayer! This was the occupation of His Sacred Heart. He loved, He adored, He repaired, He prayed, He immolated Himself for the Father's glory, for the salvation of the universe. He traced out the Divine plan of His Church, according to the eternal design He had seen in the bosom of the Father, and as each stratagem of His enemy for the defeat of that plan and the overthrow of His Church passed before Him, He devised the infallible means by which the evil influence should be counteracted, and the cause of good should triumph.

    Of what importance was it that the hands of Jesus did but plane wood in a carpenter's shop whilst His Heart was thus incessantly and divinely occupied? Could there really be monotony in such a life as this? Whatever may have been its exterior, the interior of that life was the most sublime that can be imagined.

    Sublime also is the hidden life of those who have learnt to imitate Him, whose hearts, like His, are wholly occupied, as far as they can be in this life, with the interests of God and of souls; a life indeed which the wise ones of this world despise - which materialists scorn as useless. But in the great day of revelation they will be forced to exclaim: "We fools esteemed their life madness and their end without honour; behold how they are numbered among the children of God, and their lot is among the saints."

    And now let us look into our own interior, and examine the thoughts and desires that succeed each other incessantly throughout the day. To whom, to what, do they relate? To Him who gave us understanding in order that we might know and contemplate Him, a heart but to love Him, faculties of soul and body but to serve Him with? Or do we not rather concentrate our thoughts, at least for the most part, on self, on our own personal interests, wishes, and affairs, or on those of the limited circle of beings who come within our sphere, and between whom and ourselves perhaps only natural ties exist?

    The trials of the Church, the loss of souls, the darkness in which the poor heathen are sitting for want of missioners to bear to them the light of truth, the revolt of nations from their allegiance to God and His Vicar, besides many other like interests all so intimately involving the glory of God, are these the objects which occupy our hearts and minds, which are so constituted that they must be incessantly occupied with something?

    (. . .)
    2 Corinthians 4:3-4

    And if our gospel be also hid, it is hid to them that are lost, In whom the god of this world hath blinded the minds of unbelievers, that the light of the gospel of the glory of Christ, who is the image of God, should not shine unto them.


    Offline trad123

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    Re: Book: The Heart of Jesus of Nazareth: Meditations on the Hidden Life
    « Reply #2 on: January 15, 2021, 08:23:08 AM »
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  • Thirteenth Meditation


    Quote
    (. . .)

    If the hearts of men were penetrated with the spirit of the Heart of Jesus, how different would be the lives of the greater number, and how changed the conduct even of those who are striving after virtue.

    Looking on the self-humiliation of the Incarnate God, we should become ashamed of our pride, we should conceive a contempt for our own littleness, from whence spring up our petty ambitions, our self-complacency in either real or imaginary advantages, our secret craving for notice, esteem, honour of any kind.

    Then would those whom reverse of fortune has removed from the sphere they formerly occupied, and placed in new and humiliating circumstances, find their consolation in the thought that Jesus, the Son of the living God, was known in the village of Nazareth but as the "Son of the Carpenter."

    Then would the Religious of high birth, or who had held a good social position, or had been heretofore esteemed for his intellectual endowments, rejoice if he were destined to pass his entire religious life in insignificant employments, unnoticed, passed by, depreciated, in a word, the lowest in the house of God.

    (. . .)



    Twenty-Second Mediation


    Quote
    (. . .)

    Sublime, indeed, is the figure of our Divine Lord as we contemplate Him toiling at Nazareth, as though for Him there were no other work on earth to do than to saw, and plane wood, and fashion rude implements of agriculture, but sublimer still the unruffled peace, the grand tranquility of His Sacred Heart, despite His full knowledge of the false doctrines, the errors, the follies that were being propagated around Him, the darkness in which as yet the whole world was lying, and which He alone could dissipate.

    Despite His consuming zeal to make known His Father to men and to attract them to His love, notwithstanding His all-holy thirst to communicate to them that eternal life, which He had come down on earth to bring them - the knowledge, the true knowledge of "the only true God and Jesus Christ, whom He had sent," (John 17:3) - yet He remained in Joseph's workshop without a ruffle to stir the grand tranquility of His Holy Soul.

    Beautiful in His calmness, majestic in His simplicity, we behold in Him the excellence, the perpetual order of the Father's will. Although all seemed to human reason going wrong, or, to say the least, at a standstill, so far as the evangelization of the world was concerned, yet Jesus was content.

    While the long monotonous years succeeded each other at Nazareth, the same unruffled peace abode in His Sacred Heart, and offered its silent tribute of praise to His Father. His apparent inaction was an appointment of the Father's will - the realization of an eternal decree: by His ordinance each day went on in its appointed course, and Jesus knew that all things serve that will from whence they originally emanate, and this was enough.

    (. . .)
    2 Corinthians 4:3-4

    And if our gospel be also hid, it is hid to them that are lost, In whom the god of this world hath blinded the minds of unbelievers, that the light of the gospel of the glory of Christ, who is the image of God, should not shine unto them.

    Offline trad123

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    Re: Book: The Heart of Jesus of Nazareth: Meditations on the Hidden Life
    « Reply #3 on: January 15, 2021, 08:27:04 AM »
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  • Eighteenth Mediation


    Quote
    (. . .)

    A hidden life is one of faith, and the Divine Master is the Exemplar of it.

    The Priest, the Missioner, the Sister of Charity, etc., may and frequently do behold the fruits of their labours either in souls converted to the Church, or in those who have been restored to the practice of their religion through their ministry, or in their success with at least a fair proportion of the little ones confided to their care. But there are others whose mission it is to retrace, in a more special manner, the Hidden Life of Jesus, and this, not only in the cloister, but also in the midst of the world, and into whose daily routine enter none of those external works which render so great glory to God.

    The lives of such are passed in ordinary material labour, or even in a round of worldly pastimes so irksome for a heart to which the Holy Spirit has breathed and whispered of higher things, or in one of those Religious Orders which are devoted exclusively to the practice of prayer and penance.

    Amongst these there may be souls that burn with a strong desire to labour for the interests of God, but either their state of life or their circumstances prevent them from doing this in any visible or material way.

    Let such persons turn their inward eye to their Divine Master engaged in the workshop at Nazareth, and with the true spirit of faith behold the life He there led during the principal part of His days on earth. Contemplation like to that will teach them to believe and understand how God chooses ways of glorifying Himself, and of effecting His designs for the salvation of the world, very different from those which human wisdom would select.

    They will derive, moreover, courage to persevere in their apparently inglorious and useless life, from the new consciousness, to which they will be awakened, that whatever paths in life may have been allotted to them, they can, by animating themselves with the spirit of Jesus Christ, glorify God, and co-operate with Him for the salvation of souls.

    (. . .)
    2 Corinthians 4:3-4

    And if our gospel be also hid, it is hid to them that are lost, In whom the god of this world hath blinded the minds of unbelievers, that the light of the gospel of the glory of Christ, who is the image of God, should not shine unto them.


     

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