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Author Topic: Hail, Mary (in Irish)  (Read 1180 times)

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Offline Viva Cristo Rey

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Hail, Mary (in Irish)
« on: January 17, 2018, 06:43:35 PM »
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  • To live with the Saints in Heaven is all bliss and glory....To live with the saints on Earth is just another story!  (unknown)

    Offline Neil Obstat

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    Re: Hail, Mary (in Irish)
    « Reply #1 on: January 17, 2018, 07:17:32 PM »
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  • https://youtu.be/WSo1hr21PQM
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    That's tremendous!  Everyone here should go to the linked site and "like" the video --- she deserves millions of views!
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    The next one that automatically comes up is the Our Father. We should all like that one, too!!
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    (When they say "in Irish" they're talking about Gaelic, but since the *#%@! English get so emotional about that...)
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    .--. .-.-.- ... .-.-.- ..-. --- .-. - .... . -.- .. -. --. -.. --- -- --..-- - .... . .--. --- .-- . .-. .- -. -.. -....- -....- .--- ..- ... - -.- .. -.. -.. .. -. --. .-.-.


    Offline victim of the sspx

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    Re: Hail, Mary (in Irish)
    « Reply #2 on: January 20, 2018, 03:39:39 PM »
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  • Do ye all know that the way nouns and verbs are arranged in Gaelic is the same way as they are arranged in Hebrew.
    Gaelic is one of the oldest languages in Europe, in either 1st or 2nd place. It is from a different root to all other languages and it is unique that it is not descended from Latin which came after. The language used to be spoken in central europe all the way up to the borders of turkey, when the Hallstat culture existed, and before it was the proto-celtic culture. The advances of the Romans exiled the language to the british isles and it survived in Ireland with 80 000 fluent speakers and Scotland with 65 000 fluent in Scots Gaelic. Scots and Irish Gaelic is intelligible to each other. It is also found on many megalithic tombs and monuments all over europe, in the middle east, and also a few in the Americas. Celtic Ogham writing was discovered in America where the inscription reads "The sun shines here at Bel" and the sun in fact does shine on that cliff face on the Celtic festival of bel. Be proud of your race and history and culture.

    Offline Meg

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    Re: Hail, Mary (in Irish)
    « Reply #3 on: January 20, 2018, 03:50:28 PM »
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  • Do ye all know that the way nouns and verbs are arranged in Gaelic is the same way as they are arranged in Hebrew.
    Gaelic is one of the oldest languages in Europe, in either 1st or 2nd place. It is from a different root to all other languages and it is unique that it is not descended from Latin which came after. The language used to be spoken in central europe all the way up to the borders of turkey, when the Hallstat culture existed, and before it was the proto-celtic culture. The advances of the Romans exiled the language to the british isles and it survived in Ireland with 80 000 fluent speakers and Scotland with 65 000 fluent in Scots Gaelic. Scots and Irish Gaelic is intelligible to each other. It is also found on many megalithic tombs and monuments all over europe, in the middle east, and also a few in the Americas. Celtic Ogham writing was discovered in America where the inscription reads "The sun shines here at Bel" and the sun in fact does shine on that cliff face on the Celtic festival of bel. Be proud of your race and history and culture.

    Thanks for posting the history above. I wasn't aware of the similarity in the arrangement nouns and verbs between Gaelic and Hebrew. I just know that the arrangement of Scottish Gaelic is quite different from that of English.

    I don't know how many native Irish speakers are left in Ireland now. Fewer and fewer speak Scottish Gaelic in the Gaeltacht of Scotland, as it isn't so much their first language now, as it once was there.

    Offline Prayerful

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    Re: Hail, Mary (in Irish)
    « Reply #4 on: January 20, 2018, 04:08:15 PM »
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  • The number of Irish speakers depends on how you count them. If you reckon those with a native fluency, something like 60,000 would be credible, but add a zero for the numbers who claim to varying degrees of expertise from learned fluency to the proverbial 'cupla focail,' the couple of words.


    Offline victim of the sspx

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    Re: Hail, Mary (in Irish)
    « Reply #5 on: January 20, 2018, 04:17:43 PM »
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  • Langfocus on Youtube helps you learn about origins of languages.
    There are also videos elsewhere about Ogham being found in America

    Also St Brendan the navigator landed in America with a boat full of monks a long time ago, before Columbus
    he was irish

     

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