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Author Topic: Yellowstone caldera could erupt but when, or how?  (Read 2411 times)

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Offline Neil Obstat

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Yellowstone caldera could erupt but when, or how?
« on: September 05, 2015, 02:35:05 AM »
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    This video was published in January of this year:


    [youtube]https://www.youtube.com/embed/-iGJlYgp43s[/youtube]

    Yellowstone Caldera : The Biggest Volcanic Eruption Ever Awaits Mankind

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    Offline Neil Obstat

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    Yellowstone caldera could erupt but when, or how?
    « Reply #1 on: September 05, 2015, 02:50:35 AM »
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    This viewer didn't pay attention:

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    Leon Maliniak 8 months ago
    we know it's coming....we know it will devastating

    Why can we not PREVENT the explosion by DRILLING RELIEF VALVES all over the place to release the buildup of gas and turn it into a slowly oozing volcano like Mt. Kileauea  in Hawaii


    Drilling relief vents can only allow escaping gas.  There is a lot of gas to let off.  But letting off gasses only makes the explosive buildup more powerful because the gasses inhibit the rise of magma, and when the gasses are let off, the magma rises faster, with more devastating effect.

    As for Hawaii, that's a different type of volcano (shield volcano) and that's why its magma oozes slowly.  Yellowstone has the explosive type.

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    Offline Croix de Fer

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    Re: Yellowstone caldera could erupt but when, or how?
    « Reply #2 on: June 30, 2017, 06:15:53 PM »
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  • Unusual activity returns to Yellowstone.

    http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2017-06-19/there-have-been-296-earthquakes-near-yellowstone-supervolcano-within-last-7-days


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    Is it possible that the Yellowstone supervolcano is gearing up for a major eruption? If you follow my work on a regular basis, then you already know that I spend a lot of time documenting how the crust of our planet is becoming increasingly unstable. Most of this shaking is taking place far away from the continental United States, and so most Americans are not too concerned about it. But we should be concerned about it, because a major seismic event could change all of our lives in a single instant. For instance, a full-blown eruption of the Yellowstone supervolcano would have the potential of being an E.L.E. (extinction level event). That is why it is so alarming that there have been 296 earthquakes in the vicinity of the Yellowstone supervolcano within the last 7 days. Scientists are trying to convince us that everything is going to be okay, but there are others that are not so sure.

    The biggest earthquake in this swarm occurred last Thursday evening. It was initially measured to be a magnitude 4.5 earthquake, but it was later downgraded to a 4.4. It was the biggest quake in the region since a magnitude 4.8 earthquake struck close to Norris Geyser Basin in March 2014. This magnitude 4.4 earthquake was so powerful that people felt it as far away as Bozeman

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    The main quake was centered about 5.8 miles underground.
     
    The quake and aftershocks occurred just over 8 miles northeast from West Yellowstone, according to the U.S. Geological Service.
     
    A witness reported that she felt the building she was in move.
     
    Dozens of people reported that they felt it in and around West Yellowstone, Gardiner, Ennis, and Bozeman.
    But by itself that one quake would only be of minor concern. What is troubling many of the experts is that this earthquake has been accompanied by 295 smaller ones.

    There is normally a rise in seismic activity before a volcano erupts, and according to theoretical physicist Michio Kaku, a long overdue eruption at Yellowstone could “rip the guts out of the USA”
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    Scientists currently believe that there’s a 10% chance that a “supervolcanic Category 7 eruption” could take place this century, as pointed out by theoretical physicist Michio Kaku who appeared on a segment for Fox News.
     
    The grey haired physicist told Shepard Smith that the “danger” we are now facing with the caldera is that it’s long overdue for an eruption which Kaku said could “rip the guts out of the USA.”
     
    Kaku said that a “pocket of lava” located under the park has turned out to be twice as big as scientists originally thought.
    I would like to try to describe for you what a full-blown eruption of the Yellowstone supervolcano would mean for this country.
    Hundreds of cubic miles of ash, rock and lava would be blasted into the atmosphere, and this would likely plunge much of the northern hemisphere into several days of complete darkness. Virtually everything within 100 miles of Yellowstone would be immediately killed, but a much more cruel fate would befall those that live in major cities outside of the immediate blast zone such as Salt Lake City and Denver.
    Hot volcanic ash, rock and dust would rain down on those cities literally for weeks. In the end, it would be extremely difficult for anyone living in those communities to survive. In fact, it has been estimated that 90 percent of all people living within 600 miles of Yellowstone would be killed.
    Experts project that such an eruption would dump a layer of volcanic ash that is at least 10 feet deep up to 1,000 miles away, and approximately two-thirds of the United States would suddenly become uninhabitable. The volcanic ash would severely contaminate most of our water supplies, and growing food in the middle of the country would become next to impossible.
    In other words, it would be the end of our country as we know it today.
    The rest of the planet, and this would especially be true for the northern hemisphere, would experience what is known as a “nuclear winter”. An extreme period of “global cooling” would take place, and temperatures around the world would fall by up to 20 degrees. Crops would fail all over the planet, and severe famine would sweep the globe.
    In the end, billions could die.
    So yes, this is a threat that we should take very seriously.
    But today, most Americans think of Yellowstone as little more than a fun tourist attraction. But the truth is that many tourists have discovered just how dangerous Yellowstone can be. Some have been scalded by boiling water from geysers that can get as hot as 250 degrees Fahrenheit, and one man from North Carolina recently had to be flown to a burn center after he mistakenly fell into a hot spring
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    A North Carolina man was flown to the University of Utah Burn Center after falling into a hot spring at Yellowstone National Park late Tuesday night.
     
    Gervais Dylan Gatete, 21, was with seven other people in the Lower Geyser Basin north of Old Faithful when he fell, according to a park news release.
     
    The group attempted to transport Gatete, an employee with Xanterra Parks and Resorts, by car for medical treatment. Just before midnight, they flagged down a park ranger near Seven Mile Bridge on the West Entrance Road.
    Since Yellowstone is still very active, scientists assure us that it will erupt again one day.
    And when that happens, all of our lives will be completely turned upside down in a single moment.

    Blessed be the Lord my God, who teacheth my hands to fight, and my fingers to war. ~ Psalms 143:1 (Douay-Rheims)

    Offline Croix de Fer

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    Re: Yellowstone caldera could erupt but when, or how?
    « Reply #3 on: July 06, 2017, 04:28:44 PM »
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  • Montana Earthquake Is Felt For Hundreds Of Miles Early Thursday

    http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/07/06/535741701/montana-earthquake-is-felt-for-hundreds-of-miles-early-thursday


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    A map shows seismic activity around the site of a 5.8 magnitude earthquake that struck western Montana early Thursday. U.S. Geological Survey hide caption
    toggle caption
    U.S. Geological Survey

    A map shows seismic activity around the site of a 5.8 magnitude earthquake that struck western Montana early Thursday.
    U.S. Geological Survey
    An earthquake with a magnitude of 5.8 startled many people out of their sleep in western Montana early Thursday. The shallow quake was felt for hundreds of miles from its epicenter southeast of Lincoln, including in parts of neighboring states and in Canada.
    "We have no reports of injuries due to the earthquake at this time," member station Montana Public Radio reports. "Shockwaves are still being felt with decreasing intensity in parts of western Montana."
    Thursday's earthquake was the strongest to hit western Montana in years; it was slightly stronger than a 5.6 magnitude quake that hit a nearby area in July 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey says.
    Some alarmed residents said via Twitter that they woke to fears that an intruder was in their house; others said their dogs had seemed to sense the oncoming quake — and jumped on their owners to seek safety.


    "It was strong enough to wake people up across a wide area, and was felt along a line more than 500 miles long, from Billings to Spokane, Wash.," Montana Public Radio's Eric Whitney reports for our Newscast unit.


    Residents reported waking to the sound of pans clattering around and the feeling of their houses being shaken.
    "Woke me and my parakeet up," Terry MacPheat wrote on the MTPR Facebook posting about the quake, adding, "bed was shaking like something from an Exorcist movie!"
    Another MTPR listener, David Buckingham, reported, "I was awake here in Bozeman, sitting at my desk, when it happened; it felt like I was on a boat in choppy seas, and all the birds in my neighborhood simultaneously made a ruckus and flew away."
    Aaron Birkholz, who runs a roadside coffee stand — where a sign was touting "huckleberry shakes" Thursday — also compared the experience to being on a boat, telling MTPR's Whitney that it had given him motion sickness.
    "This one was different, it wasn't a real quick shake," Birkholz said of the earthquake.
               

    Volunteers helped clean up the mess at D&D Foodtown grocery, after an earthquake hit overnight. Assistant manager Ruth Baker says the damage included pickle jars and wine bottles.
    Eric Whitney /Montana Public Radio
    At the D&D Foodtown grocery in Lincoln, volunteers helped the store's staff clean up the mess Thursday, after the quake shook wine bottles, pickle jars and other items off the shelves. Assistant manager Ruth Baker tells Whitney that all the store's eggs made it through safely.
    Enlarge this image
    An image from the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology's network of seismographs shows the 5.8 magnitude earthquake and aftershocks that began at 12:30 a.m. Thursday. The image "clearly shows the [initial] P-wave arrival followed closely by a series of strong S-waves and then numerous aftershocks," the National Weather Service says. Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology hide caption
    toggle caption
    Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology

    An image from the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology's network of seismographs shows the 5.8 magnitude earthquake and aftershocks that began at 12:30 a.m. Thursday. The image "clearly shows the [initial] P-wave arrival followed closely by a series of strong S-waves and then numerous aftershocks," the National Weather Service says.
    Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology
    At least 10 measurable temblors hit Montana from 12:30 to 1:31 a.m. Thursday, with the last two having magnitudes of 3.9 and 4.4, according to the United States Geological Survey.
    The quake's epicenter was some 230 miles from Yellowstone National Park — and because it was felt from far away, the shaking led some in the area to wonder whether the Yellowstone supervolcano was finally emerging from its slumber. But the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory's most recent volcano alert level is listed as normal, and the park service has said that while the area normally has more than 1,000 earthquakes each year, its experts predict a large eruption "very unlikely" to strike in the next 1,000 to 10,000 years.
    More details about the overnight quake from the USGS:
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    "The location and focal mechanism solution of this earthquake are consistent with right-lateral faulting in association with faults of the Lewis and Clark line, a prominent zone of strike-slip, dip slip and oblique slip faulting trending east-southeast from northern Idaho to east of Helena, Montana, southeast of this earthquake."
    Blessed be the Lord my God, who teacheth my hands to fight, and my fingers to war. ~ Psalms 143:1 (Douay-Rheims)

     

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