Author Topic: US Postal Service struggling  (Read 880 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Matthew

  • Mod
  • *****
  • Posts: 23956
  • Reputation: +20944/-420
  • Gender: Male
US Postal Service struggling
« on: March 02, 2010, 10:04:03 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) -- Snail mail might soon get even slower.

    The U.S. Postal Service plans to propose Tuesday an adjusted mail service schedule, which will likely cut Saturday delivery. The agency will also suggest closing some branches and expanding its use of self-service kiosks in grocery stores and other popular retail spots, as part of its effort to work its way out of a mountain of debt.

    USPS posted a $3.8 billion loss in its 2009 fiscal year, the latest in a multiyear string of whopping losses. Mail volume was down 12.7% for the year, a trend the agency expects to continue over the next decade as more consumers opt for online bill payments and message delivery.

    The Post Office was $10 billion in debt as of Sept. 30 -- not far off from its $15 billion debt limit, which the agency expects to hit in its 2011 fiscal year.
    Dear USPS: Consider privatizing

    The challenges hurting USPS's bottom line are reflective of a "macro change in society," Postmaster General Jack Potter said at a press conference Monday previewing the proposed changes. "All posts around the world are challenged, just as we are, by the diversion of hard copy to electronic medium."

    The Post Office, an independent government agency, does not receive taxpayer dollars and is funded entirely by its own revenue. However, the Postal Reorganization Act of 1970 constrains the agency's operations. It prohibits USPS from closing small branches based soled on economic factors, and prevents the agency from expanding its services beyond postal delivery.

    Post offices in some countries, including Italy and Japan, have boosted their sales by offering ancillary services, like banking. But unless Congress steps in, USPS cannot expand beyond the postal-mail realm.

    USPS has already begun taking the axe to its budget. The agency made $6 billion in cuts last year, reducing its workforce by about 40,000 employees and chopping overtime hours, transportation costs and other expenses. Congress passed legislation allowing the organization to cut retiree health benefit payments by $4 billion.

    Despite those measures, the agency still expects a net loss of $7.8 billion in fiscal 2010.

    USPS employs about 600,000 workers, about half of whom will be eligible to retire in the next 10 years. Potter said the agency has historically overpaid into its pension fund, and would reap significant savings if it stopped prefunding its retiree health benefits.

    The Post Office plans to announce the specifics of its proposed new business model on Tuesday. Its plans will then go before Congress for review. A significant postal price hike is also under consideration, although the price most consumers care about -- the rate for a first-class stamp -- is locked in at 44 cents for 2010.

    "At the end of the day, I'm convinced that if we make the changes that are necessary, we can continue to provide universal service for America for decades to come," Potter said. "We can turn back from the red to the black, but there are some very significant changes that are going to have to be made."
    Start your Amazon.com session by clicking this link, and my family and I get a commission on your purchase!

    Offline Matthew

    • Mod
    • *****
    • Posts: 23956
    • Reputation: +20944/-420
    • Gender: Male
    US Postal Service struggling
    « Reply #1 on: March 02, 2010, 10:06:11 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • This article doesn't address one annoying little issue: How does dropping Saturday mail delivery save money for the USPS?

    Yes, their gasoline bill would go down a bit. They wouldn't save much electricity, because most branches are only open for a couple hours on Saturday anyhow.

    Would it reduce the number of trucks they will have? The number of buildings they need? Their cost of equipment for sorting, etc.? Their IT budget? None of those things.

    No, there's only one expense it would reduce in a meaningful way:

    It will cost XXXX jobs -- people who used to earn their living
    , who now have to fight with countless others for the handful of jobs available out there. Many (most?) of them will end up getting welfare from the government.
    Start your Amazon.com session by clicking this link, and my family and I get a commission on your purchase!


    Offline St Jude Thaddeus

    • Full Member
    • ***
    • Posts: 854
    • Reputation: +184/-23
    • Gender: Male
    US Postal Service struggling
    « Reply #2 on: March 03, 2010, 02:06:59 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • Quote from: Matthew

    It will cost XXXX jobs -- people who used to earn their living
    , who now have to fight with countless others for the handful of jobs available out there. Many (most?) of them will end up getting welfare from the government.


    BINGO! And the remaining employees will have to work that much harder (excuse me, I meant to say increase their productivity) in order to take up the slack.
    St. Jude, who, disregarding the threats of the impious, courageously preached the doctrine of Christ,
    pray for us.

    Offline sedetrad

    • Full Member
    • ***
    • Posts: 1585
    • Reputation: +0/-0
    • Gender: Male
    US Postal Service struggling
    « Reply #3 on: March 03, 2010, 09:39:13 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • The problem with our service economy versus an agragarian or production economy is that the vast majority of jobs that we do today are useless and can be easily done without. The best jobs out their now are gov paper pushing jobs which any moron can do. It is bad out their now. I have friends that have been on unemployment for a year and a ahalf and look for work everyday and want jobs, but there aren't any for them. There are no labor jobs. Many of the mexicans have went home due to this. There are no restaurant jobbs to be had as many of them are now closing or laying off workers. The same is true for store jobs. These are young men ready and willing to work. This system is evil and I hate it.

    Offline RomanCatholic1953

    • Hero Member
    • *****
    • Posts: 7387
    • Reputation: +2498/-89
    • Gender: Male
    • I will not respond to any posts from Poche.
    US Postal Service struggling
    « Reply #4 on: March 05, 2010, 12:00:20 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • What will actually happen is that all the lay offs in the Post
    Office will only affect American born postal employees,
    and they will be replaced with recent immigrants at
    less than half the pay with no benefits, and easy to
    fire.
    The mass media falsely claims that the immigrants
    are doing the work that Americans will not do.
    This proves that we no longer live in a Republic,
    but we are ruled by a wealthy elite oligarchs that
    controls all sides of an issue.
    We are fast moving into a feudal system, and a
    serfdom that are purposely being set up by the
    ruling elite.


    Offline Matthew

    • Mod
    • *****
    • Posts: 23956
    • Reputation: +20944/-420
    • Gender: Male
    US Postal Service struggling
    « Reply #5 on: March 05, 2010, 11:04:56 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • Quote from: sedetrad
    The problem with our service economy versus an agragarian or production economy is that the vast majority of jobs that we do today are useless and can be easily done without. The best jobs out their now are gov paper pushing jobs which any moron can do. It is bad out their now. I have friends that have been on unemployment for a year and a ahalf and look for work everyday and want jobs, but there aren't any for them. There are no labor jobs. Many of the mexicans have went home due to this. There are no restaurant jobbs to be had as many of them are now closing or laying off workers. The same is true for store jobs. These are young men ready and willing to work. This system is evil and I hate it.


    It's funny that people happily refer to our economy as a "service economy" -- which it is, don't get me wrong.

    But what does that make us, the members of that economy? A bunch of servants.
    Start your Amazon.com session by clicking this link, and my family and I get a commission on your purchase!

    Offline Belloc

    • Hero Member
    • *****
    • Posts: 6601
    • Reputation: +614/-0
    • Gender: Male
    US Postal Service struggling
    « Reply #6 on: March 05, 2010, 11:16:49 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • service jobs actually cost money-nursing, teaching or generate little income otherwise.....we are starting to vend that out too, between large companies that copy medica lrecords, foreign office workers and medical personel. I have to talk to medical offices all the time, half time now I almost have to be proficient in Spanish......
    Proud "European American" and prouder, still, Catholic

    Offline RomanCatholic1953

    • Hero Member
    • *****
    • Posts: 7387
    • Reputation: +2498/-89
    • Gender: Male
    • I will not respond to any posts from Poche.
    US Postal Service struggling
    « Reply #7 on: March 05, 2010, 11:27:20 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • It is very true that the US is now a service economy. The
    majority of all manufacturing jobs have been out sourced
    over seas. This was deliberate government policy no matter
    what political party controls the white house, and
    congress.  They are mostly all freemasons whom get
    their instructions in their secret meetings.
    The mass media deliberately lies to make Americans
    think that we have a healthy, and strong economy.
    Unless, you are among the 20% unemployed and growing
    that are looking for jobs, and none can be found.
    The motto of freemasory is 'Out of Chaos, there will be
    Order.' Just the reverse is true.
    'Out of order, there will be chaos.'


     

    Sitemap 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16