Author Topic: 9 ways to prepare for Food Inflation  (Read 3454 times)

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Offline Matthew

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9 ways to prepare for Food Inflation
« on: March 29, 2011, 11:45:54 AM »
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  • 9 Ways to Prepare for Food Inflation
    Mon 28 Mar 2011 12:11

    article from frugaldad.com

    If you’ve been to the grocery store lately, you’ve no doubt discovered that the price of most foods has increased significantly. There’s plenty of blame to go around: increased commodity prices due to increased demand, increased oil prices, devaluation of our dollar, and on and on.

    Whatever the reason, increased food prices are putting a major dent in our household budget. Since we can’t do much about the prices, we have to look for other ways to reduce (or at least keep even) our overall food expense.


    Food is a unique budget category in that normally when you are struggling with less income and/or increased costs, the natural inclination is to turn to cheaper alternatives. Unfortunately, as many people are discovering, when it comes to food this means an unhealthy diet.

    Think of the cheapest foods at your local grocer – they are likely cheap pastas and boxed processed foods (Ramen noodles, mac and cheese, packages of potato flakes sold as “instant mashed potatoes,” etc). While these foods will do in a pinch, they aren’t exactly healthy staples to build the basis of a clean diet.
    Nine Ways to Reduce Your Grocery Budget
    1. Plan to shop every two weeks. Make room in your pantry (and your budget) to shop for enough food to last two weeks. The more often you see the inside of a store, the more likely you will give into temptation and deviate from your list.

    2. Buy in-season produce. The simple laws of supply and demand tell us that things that are plentiful should be a little cheaper. Of course, the opposite is true if a particular produce item is not plentiful in your area, because it has to be shipped in from another part of the country (or world), and those increased costs to transport are passed along to you, the consumer.

    3. Eat less. This one seems obvious, but to someone like me raised on three squares (big squares) a day, the idea of skipping a meal or two seems foreign. However, here lately I’ve been trying to eat only when hungry, not when the clock says 8:00, 12:00 and 6:00.

    4. Grow your own vegetables. The last couple years we’ve experimented with square foot gardening. This year, we plan to expand on the idea and grow a variety of vegetables in garden boxes in our backyard. We also planted fruit trees last fall that will hopefully yield fresh fruits in the years to come.

    5. Compare unit costs, not product packaging and creative pricing. Remember bigger isn’t always cheaper, and neither are the 10/$10 deals. I recently stocked up on a few items included in a 10/$10 sale and the next week the store returned the item to their normal price…$0.88.

    6. Consider swapping beans or eggs for meats when looking for a protein source. Like any good carnivore, I like to build a meal around a good meat. Unfortunately, this can get expensive. Here lately, we’ve been enjoying eating “breakfast” for dinner – with scrambled eggs as the main course.  Beans also provide a nice source of protein and can augment a smaller amount of meat in dishes like tacos and chili to bulk up the recipe with out increasing the cost per meal.

    7. Avoid the “junk food” aisle. Nothing good comes from this aisle. Soft drinks, chips, snack cakes, and cookies are simply empty calories. And they are expensive when you consider you can’t plan a meal around them. Your waistline won’t miss this aisle, either. Now, this is an area where I need to take my own advice!

    8. Eat leftovers. One of the most effective ways to lower your cost per meal is to simply stretch your prepared foods across more meals. In fact, I have found that meals like spaghetti, soups, and meatloaf actually taste better the next night.

    9. Freeze the extras. If you are short on freezer space, consider a second freezer to stock up on meats and vegetables when on sale, or to freeze leftovers of your favorite meals. My wife makes a huge batch of soup and freezes the portions we don’t eat the first two days for later consumption. Weeks later, on a particularly hectic day, we’ll toss the frozen soup in  a crock pot to thoroughly reheat and enjoy an easy meal.

    These tips probably make sense in any environment, but are particularly important in the face of rising food costs, high unemployment and a time of high economic uncertainty. I highly recommend taking the time now to streamline your food budget and use some of the savings to build a pantry of stockpiled food.

    Best case scenario, your pantry will provide cheaper food than is currently available in the store. Worst case scenario, your pantry will provide food if there isn’t any in the store. It’s my hope that we never face the latter scenario, but I’d rather be prepared just in case.

    frugaldad.com/2011/01/18/prepare-for-food-inflation/
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    Offline Catholic Samurai

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    9 ways to prepare for Food Inflation
    « Reply #1 on: March 29, 2011, 11:59:57 AM »
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  • I think what people need to keep in mind when they are stocking food is that you should NOT rely on your freezer to preserve your food. If anything ever happened to the electricity, your store of food is gone.

    The best preservation plans for food are dehydrating, vacuum sealing, and canning (which is what you'd do for meats). While the processing the food might require electricity, the end product certainly isn't dependent on it like it would be in your freezer.
    "Louvada Siesa O' Sanctisimo Sacramento!"~warcry of the Amakusa/Shimabara rebels

    "We must risk something for God!"~Hernan Cortes


    TEJANO AND PROUD!


    Offline Matthew

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    9 ways to prepare for Food Inflation
    « Reply #2 on: March 29, 2011, 01:12:51 PM »
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  • Learning how to breed quail or chickens would be a good way to prepare for food inflation.

    Also, learning how to butcher various animals, such as quail.

    I bet we even have someone on this very message board that knows a thing or two about quail!
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    Offline Catholic Samurai

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    9 ways to prepare for Food Inflation
    « Reply #3 on: March 29, 2011, 11:48:03 PM »
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  • I would think they would be easy to can too now that I think about it. You could probably fit about 6 of them in a jar.
    "Louvada Siesa O' Sanctisimo Sacramento!"~warcry of the Amakusa/Shimabara rebels

    "We must risk something for God!"~Hernan Cortes


    TEJANO AND PROUD!

    Offline s2srea

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    9 ways to prepare for Food Inflation
    « Reply #4 on: July 21, 2011, 05:51:57 PM »
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  • Its sad... I'm so disconnected from my food I feel a bit gross thinking of cutting a bird's head off for food. Do you think this is something I could get over?


    Offline Vladimir

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    9 ways to prepare for Food Inflation
    « Reply #5 on: July 21, 2011, 08:16:38 PM »
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  • kill chicken or any other bird: cut off head, wait for blood to drain, throw into pot of boiling water, wait, take out, pull feathers.



    Offline Catholic Samurai

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    9 ways to prepare for Food Inflation
    « Reply #6 on: July 23, 2011, 07:20:14 PM »
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  • Quote from: s2srea
    Its sad... I'm so disconnected from my food I feel a bit gross thinking of cutting a bird's head off for food. Do you think this is something I could get over?


    I don't cut the heads off. I simply pull them off quickly.

    Hey, look at it this way.... it's you or the bird.
    "Louvada Siesa O' Sanctisimo Sacramento!"~warcry of the Amakusa/Shimabara rebels

    "We must risk something for God!"~Hernan Cortes


    TEJANO AND PROUD!

    Offline Catholic Samurai

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    9 ways to prepare for Food Inflation
    « Reply #7 on: July 23, 2011, 07:21:38 PM »
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  • Quote from: Vladimir
    kill chicken or any other bird: cut off head, wait for blood to drain, throw into pot of boiling water, wait, take out, pull feathers.


    Vlad, don't tell me you don't gut your birds before cooking, do you?
    "Louvada Siesa O' Sanctisimo Sacramento!"~warcry of the Amakusa/Shimabara rebels

    "We must risk something for God!"~Hernan Cortes


    TEJANO AND PROUD!


    Offline the smart sheep

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    9 ways to prepare for Food Inflation
    « Reply #8 on: July 23, 2011, 08:54:17 PM »
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  • Sheep says "EAT MORE CHICKEN"  :ready-to-eat:

    Offline s2srea

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    9 ways to prepare for Food Inflation
    « Reply #9 on: July 23, 2011, 09:43:03 PM »
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  • So, thanks to reading Matthew's post, I've really been considering raising quail. My biggest concern is my geographical location. At 5,500 ft sea level, in a mountain community, I'm worried about the snow. The research continues!

    Offline herbert

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    9 ways to prepare for Food Inflation
    « Reply #10 on: July 24, 2011, 08:29:09 PM »
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  • Quote from: Catholic Samurai
    I think what people need to keep in mind when they are stocking food is that you should NOT rely on your freezer to preserve your food. If anything ever happened to the electricity, your store of food is gone.

    The best preservation plans for food are dehydrating, vacuum sealing, and canning (which is what you'd do for meats). While the processing the food might require electricity, the end product certainly isn't dependent on it like it would be in your freezer.


    you are correect! get this: http://survivalacres.com/cgi-bin/quikstore.cgi?search=yes&product=SA13F&template=database_product_page&exact_match=yes

    $1000 gives you enough food for whole year for one person! bon appetitie


    Offline Catholic Samurai

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    9 ways to prepare for Food Inflation
    « Reply #11 on: July 24, 2011, 09:23:19 PM »
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  • Quote from: s2srea
    So, thanks to reading Matthew's post, I've really been considering raising quail. My biggest concern is my geographical location. At 5,500 ft sea level, in a mountain community, I'm worried about the snow. The research continues!


    I doubt you would have any major problems raising them out. Incubation is likely to be more difficult since your at a higher altitude. As for snow, the Yankees seem to manage, and my (adult) flocks did well with some straw stuffed in their cages when we had that "Arctic Blast" this year.
    "Louvada Siesa O' Sanctisimo Sacramento!"~warcry of the Amakusa/Shimabara rebels

    "We must risk something for God!"~Hernan Cortes


    TEJANO AND PROUD!

    Offline Catholic Samurai

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    9 ways to prepare for Food Inflation
    « Reply #12 on: July 24, 2011, 09:32:32 PM »
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  • Quote from: herbert
    Quote from: Catholic Samurai
    I think what people need to keep in mind when they are stocking food is that you should NOT rely on your freezer to preserve your food. If anything ever happened to the electricity, your store of food is gone.

    The best preservation plans for food are dehydrating, vacuum sealing, and canning (which is what you'd do for meats). While the processing the food might require electricity, the end product certainly isn't dependent on it like it would be in your freezer.


    you are correect! get this: http://survivalacres.com/cgi-bin/quikstore.cgi?search=yes&product=SA13F&template=database_product_page&exact_match=yes

    $1000 gives you enough food for whole year for one person! bon appetitie


    When it comes to buying packaged survival food or MRE's make sure that they are in fact being sold by a legitimate retail or wholesaler, and are not the stolen property of the military, and also that they are not past their expiration date as many of them ARE.

    Otherwise you should just store your own food according to your dietary needs and tastes. You don't want to have to get used to eating a different variety of foods too soon during a crisis, or be stuck with foods that won't meet your nutritional needs, all because you wanted to save yourself the time and hassle of selecting and storing the food.
    "Louvada Siesa O' Sanctisimo Sacramento!"~warcry of the Amakusa/Shimabara rebels

    "We must risk something for God!"~Hernan Cortes


    TEJANO AND PROUD!

    Offline herbert

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    9 ways to prepare for Food Inflation
    « Reply #13 on: July 25, 2011, 01:08:47 AM »
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  • Quote from: Catholic Samurai
    Quote from: herbert
    Quote from: Catholic Samurai
    I think what people need to keep in mind when they are stocking food is that you should NOT rely on your freezer to preserve your food. If anything ever happened to the electricity, your store of food is gone.

    The best preservation plans for food are dehydrating, vacuum sealing, and canning (which is what you'd do for meats). While the processing the food might require electricity, the end product certainly isn't dependent on it like it would be in your freezer.


    you are correect! get this: http://survivalacres.com/cgi-bin/quikstore.cgi?search=yes&product=SA13F&template=database_product_page&exact_match=yes

    $1000 gives you enough food for whole year for one person! bon appetitie


    When it comes to buying packaged survival food or MRE's make sure that they are in fact being sold by a legitimate retail or wholesaler, and are not the stolen property of the military, and also that they are not past their expiration date as many of them ARE.

    Otherwise you should just store your own food according to your dietary needs and tastes. You don't want to have to get used to eating a different variety of foods too soon during a crisis, or be stuck with foods that won't meet your nutritional needs, all because you wanted to save yourself the time and hassle of selecting and storing the food.


    how about costco: http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?Prodid=11487214

    $999 for a year of food. seems like amazing deal.

    they seem trustworhy

    Offline s2srea

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    9 ways to prepare for Food Inflation
    « Reply #14 on: July 25, 2011, 02:34:24 PM »
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  • Quote from: Catholic Samurai
    Quote from: s2srea
    So, thanks to reading Matthew's post, I've really been considering raising quail. My biggest concern is my geographical location. At 5,500 ft sea level, in a mountain community, I'm worried about the snow. The research continues!


    I doubt you would have any major problems raising them out. Incubation is likely to be more difficult since your at a higher altitude. As for snow, the Yankees seem to manage, and my (adult) flocks did well with some straw stuffed in their cages when we had that "Arctic Blast" this year.


    Thanks amigo. I think I've concluded, after much research, it would be better to start with bees. I found this type of hive would be best for me for a number of reasons:



    Asthetics, I can build it myself relatively easily, and it seems very easy to handle and manage.

    From HERE:
    "The topbar beehive is not a new concept. Historical reference to the top-bar hive date back to the 1600's. Most of today's top bar bee hives are derived from work in the 1960's. It was perfected for use in Kenya, Africa, and is often referred to as the Kenya Hive. Today it is also used in many other developing countries for it's simple design and cost effective management methods. In recent years it has also become more popular in the United States."

    There are some great websites detailing the construction and managment of this type of hive. There's also a really good number of videos on youtube. I think i may have to wait untill next spring though if I'm going to be successfull  :cry:


     

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