Author Topic: December 3rd supermoon -- this one is the biggest  (Read 851 times)

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Offline Neil Obstat

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Re: December 3rd supermoon -- this one is the biggest
« Reply #30 on: January 10, 2018, 12:10:17 AM »
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  • :popcorn:
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    While you're busy stuffing your face, be aware everyone's still waiting for your description, how to get that curve when you think the sun is whirling around like a dervish over your "flat" earth.
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    Offline Smedley Butler

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    Re: December 3rd supermoon -- this one is the biggest
    « Reply #31 on: January 10, 2018, 08:19:02 AM »
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  • .
    From the very informative website:
    http://earthsky.org/tonight/december-cold-moon-tonight
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    Tonight – December 2, 2017 – watch for the nearly full moon. As seen from around the world, the moon will shine pretty much all night long, starting around sunset on this night. Although the calendar gives December 3 as the full moon date, the exact clock time (and possibly the date) of the full moon varies by time zone. No matter where you live worldwide, the moon will appear plenty full to the eye both tonight and tomorrow night.
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    By the way, this full moon will be the only full moon supermoon to light up our sky in 2017. What’s a supermoon? Read more about it in our post for December 3, 2017.
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    The December 2 moon shines in front of the constellation Taurus the Bull. Despite the lunar glare, you still might be able to make out Aldebaran, Taurus’ brightest star, and possibly the Pleiades star cluster.
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    Read more: Occultation of Aldebaran on the night of December 2-3, 2017
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    Worldwide map via the US Naval Observatory. Day and night sides of Earth at the instant of full moon (2017 December 3 at 15:47 UTC). The shadow line at left depicts sunrise December 3 and the the shadow line at right represents sunset December 3.
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    The full moon, our nocturnal sun, stays out throughout the night, and then sleeps in during the day. The December full moon, like the June sun, climbs up high as seen from the Northern Hemisphere sky. A full moon near the winter solstice travels a high path across the sky and stays in the sky for all hours of the night. That’s why one of the names for this full moon is the Long Night Moon.
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    From the Southern Hemisphere, where the days are long and the nights are short, the December full moon follows the low path of the winter sun. After all, it’s the hot season in that hemisphere now.
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    From the contiguous United States, the moon reaches the crest of its full phase during the daylight hours on December 3, when the moon is beneath our horizon. At North American time zones, the moon turns precisely full – resides 180o from the sun in ecliptic longitude – at 11:47 a.m. AST, 10:47 a.m. EST, 9:47 a.m. CST, 8:47 a.m. MST and 7:47 a.m. PST.
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    However, if you live in Alaska or Hawaii, the moon turns full before sunrise December 3, meaning the moon will be in your sky at the instant of full moon, which takes place on December 3, 2017, at 15:47 Universal Time (UTC) – or 6:47 a.m. AKST (Alaska Standard Time) and 5:47 a.m. Hawaii-Aleution Standard Time (HAST).
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    Bottom line: From around the world, the December 2, 2017 moon shines in the east at nightfall, climbs highest for the night around midnight and sets in the west around sunrise December 3. For the contiguous United States, the moon will turn precisely full during the daylight hours on December 3, when the moon is below the horizon.
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    Speaking of the Naval Observatory, the North Koreans would love to know that some Americans are flat-earthers - they would likely hope that some of the people responsible for ICBM tracking are ignorant of the earth's curvature, so the Korean missiles would then have a decided advantage.
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    When you trace the line from your graphic on a flat earth map,  it makes a circle. 
    Try it.


    Offline Truth is Eternal

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    Re: December 3rd supermoon -- this one is the biggest
    « Reply #32 on: January 10, 2018, 11:21:25 AM »
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  • When you trace the line from your graphic on a flat earth map,  it makes a circle.
    Try it.
    It is not that difficult Neil.
    "I Think it is Time Cathinfo Has a Public Profession of Belief." "Thank you for publicly affirming the necessity of believing, without innovations, all Infallibly Defined Dogmas of the One, Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic Church."

    Offline WholeFoodsTrad

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    Re: December 3rd supermoon -- this one is the biggest
    « Reply #33 on: January 10, 2018, 04:01:12 PM »
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  • When you trace the line from your graphic on a flat earth map,  it makes a circle.
    Try it.
    I thought as much.  Not surprisingly, things like this usually make more sense on a flat map, than they do on a globe.  I just wanted Neil to get off his lazy arse and do some work for a change.  

    Offline WholeFoodsTrad

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    Re: December 3rd supermoon -- this one is the biggest
    « Reply #34 on: January 10, 2018, 04:06:39 PM »
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  •   "Neil Grabbing A Little Snack"








    Offline Neil Obstat

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    Re: December 3rd supermoon -- this one is the biggest
    « Reply #35 on: January 10, 2018, 10:14:25 PM »
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  • When you trace the line from your graphic on a flat earth map,  it makes a circle.
    Try it.
    .
    The entirety of Antarctica is illuminated. How can that be a "circle?"
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