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Offline poche

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The oldest person?
« Reply #60 on: September 12, 2015, 01:17:22 AM »
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  • Meet Eugenia Bumpass, a 100-year-old educator in central Virginia, who has spent more time in school -- and on Earth -- than most.

    The centenarian is being honored with a library and media center named after her at Louisa County High School in Mineral, Virginia, where she taught for over 30 years since 1935 when she was only 20, according to current school district superintendent Deborah Pettit.

    "She's been professionally retired for a while, but she's still a teacher in that she's walking history and a role model for our students," Pettit told ABC News today. "She acts as our local historian and is always teaching us about the county's rich past. She's still sharp and reads voraciously, and she's always recommending good books for me and others to read at the library, where she still serves as a board member."

    Pettit, who said she and her parents were once Bumpass' students, added that the 100-year-old educator still remains a "stickler for proper spoken and written English grammar."

    Bumpass told ABC affiliate WRIC that before teaching in Louisa County, she was first a student there at the age of 5 in 1920. After graduating from the University of Virginia, she came back to teach in 1935 and has never left.

    "I've never stopped [teaching]," she said. "I'm still doing it."

    Though she traveled around the world during her summer breaks, Bumpass said that "something always brought me back to Louisa."



    The century-old educator explained that her favorite thing about teaching is seeing the moment a student finally understands a frustrating, new concept.

    "I love seeing those eyes of those kids when they begin to really understand something that I’ve been fussing or fighting over for a whole week maybe or more," Bumpass said.

    Though Bumpass is no longer professionally working at Louisa County Public Schools, she said she still looks forward to visiting the high school's library named after her and catching up with new generations of students -- many of whom are grandchildren of her previous students.

    "I’ll enjoy coming here and looking out the windows at all the green things and remembering the many days I’ve had," she said. "You see, my life has been full of school memories, and I think they’ll always be with me."

    https://gma.yahoo.com/meet-100-old-educator-whos-taught-generations-students-214737612.html

    Offline poche

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    The oldest person?
    « Reply #61 on: January 05, 2016, 04:17:28 AM »
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  • We read that the oldest woman in the world, Susannah Mushatt Jones, age 116, eats four strips of bacon every morning. This, coupled with a June report that supercentenarian Agnes Fenton, age 110, credits her age to three bottles of Miller Light everyday made us realize that we might consider changing some things up. Maybe we should be eating less kale and quinoa and more whiskey and ice cream.

    https://www.yahoo.com/food/food-10-foods-and-drinks-the-oldest-people-in-155237696.html


    Offline OHCA

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    The oldest person?
    « Reply #62 on: January 05, 2016, 09:17:45 AM »
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  • Wonder if fried chicken and Colt 45 is good for longevity?

    Offline poche

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    The oldest person?
    « Reply #63 on: January 05, 2016, 11:07:26 PM »
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  • Quote from: OHCA
    Wonder if fried chicken and Colt 45 is good for longevity?


    You would have to ask one of the super centenarians.
     :farmer: :farmer: :farmer:

    Online Neil Obstat

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    The oldest person?
    « Reply #64 on: January 05, 2016, 11:26:43 PM »
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  • Quote from: poche
    We read that the oldest woman in the world, Susannah Mushatt Jones, age 116, eats four strips of bacon every morning. This, coupled with a June report that supercentenarian Agnes Fenton, age 110, credits her age to three bottles of Miller Light everyday made us realize that we might consider changing some things up. Maybe we should be eating less kale and quinoa and more whiskey and ice cream.

    https://www.yahoo.com/food/food-10-foods-and-drinks-the-oldest-people-in-155237696.html

    I don't know about whiskey and ice cream, but Grand Marnier and ice cream sounds pretty good.   :cheers:



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    Online Neil Obstat

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    The oldest person?
    « Reply #65 on: January 05, 2016, 11:35:07 PM »
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  • Quote from: OHCA
    Wonder if fried chicken and Colt 45 is good for longevity?


    Like this?


    .--. .-.-.- ... .-.-.- ..-. --- .-. - .... . -.- .. -. --. -.. --- -- --..-- - .... . .--. --- .-- . .-. .- -. -.. -....- -....- .--- ..- ... - -.- .. -.. -.. .. -. --. .-.-.

    Offline OHCA

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    The oldest person?
    « Reply #66 on: January 07, 2016, 05:17:51 AM »
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  • Yes, Neil.  That is pretty much the buffet spread that I had in mind.

    Offline poche

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    The oldest person?
    « Reply #67 on: January 08, 2016, 12:11:25 AM »
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  • Quote from: Neil Obstat
    Quote from: OHCA
    Wonder if fried chicken and Colt 45 is good for longevity?


    Like this?




    Where are the super centenarians?  


    Offline OHCA

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    The oldest person?
    « Reply #68 on: January 08, 2016, 08:01:52 AM »
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  • Quote from: poche
    Quote from: Neil Obstat
    Quote from: OHCA
    Wonder if fried chicken and Colt 45 is good for longevity?


    Like this?




    Where are the super centenarians?  


    Based on their diet, there should be billions of them.  Maybe intra thug violence is keeping their numbers down.

    Offline poche

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    The oldest person?
    « Reply #69 on: January 12, 2016, 11:19:59 PM »
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  • At 99 years old, one Louisiana woman isn't about to let her age slow her down.

    Every Tuesday, Mildred Bowie of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, plays in her 55-and-over bowling league, the Golden Nuggets. She hasn't stopped competing in almost 50 years.

    "I started bowling when my granddaughter was about three years old and she's 50 now," Bowie told ABC News. "My average is only 119. I bowl with a eight-pound ball right now because I had carpal tunnel."

    Bowie, who will be turning 100 on Jan. 19, said she joined the Golden Nuggets in 1983 and has served as the league's secretary.

    The soon-to-be centenarian said she credits her longevity to good eating, her faith and spending quality time with loved ones.

    "Go to church, watch what you eat...be light with the salt," Bowie said. "Be active and have fun and enjoy life. I like interaction with people. I taught school for 36 years. I have [tons of friends] and naturally my friends are younger and I have a very loving granddaughter and first cousin."

    "Life is really an adventure," she added. "I've seen so many wonderful things that have happened

    https://gma.yahoo.com/meet-99-old-woman-leads-louisiana-bowling-team-184901187--abc-news-wellness.html#

    Offline poche

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    The oldest person?
    « Reply #70 on: January 15, 2016, 04:48:59 AM »
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  • ­­Molly McLaughlin, 87, started nursing school on the day World War II ended, in 1945, at the dawn of the age of antibiotics, and is ending her career treating victims of a disease that didn’t even exist then. In her 67 years as a registered nurse, she’s cared for veterans of the Spanish-American War, vaccinated thousands of children with the then new Salk polio vaccine, and was among the first to report the outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease. For the past quarter century, until her retirement this month, she has been caring for HIV and AIDS victims at the Veterans Administration hospital in Philadelphia.

    “When you have a passion and you impact people’s lives on a daily basis,” she says, “it gives you a purpose.”

    As a nursing student, one of her very first patients was a 12-year-old boy, Tommy Rios, who was riding double on the handlebars of a bicycle when he fell and was hit by a car, fracturing his skull and breaking his femur and pelvis. He was in a full body cast, in the hospital, for six months. Molly not only cared for him, but also brought him hoagies — the Philly word for submarine sandwiches — because he wasn’t eating the hospital food.

    Molly’s niece Anne Harriott asked her the other day what ever became of the boy.

    “I had lunch with him last week,” Molly replied.

    Indeed, Rios, now 81, always felt enormous gratitude to Molly. He’d look her up whenever he returned to the hospital for follow-up visits, and they became lifelong friends. Years later, he taught Molly how to drive. When Rios married and had a daughter, he asked Molly to be godmother.

    “Molly is a very caring person,” Rios said the other day. “When I was in the hospital for the six months, she was the one who kept me alive.”

    Molly grew up in Philadelphia and says she’d wanted to be a nurse since the seventh grade. Her graduation present from Catholic high school was a bandage scissors and syringe, back in the day before disposables.

    Molly’s interest was always public health.

    After her graduation from Fitzgerald Mercy nursing school, she worked for the Philadelphia health department. She administered the newly discovered polio vaccine to thousands of schoolchildren. She has no idea how many thousands of shots she’s given since starting nursing school 70 years ago, but confesses, “I’m pretty good at it. I’m fast.”

    In 1960, she went to work for the Philadelphia VA Medical Center — and spent the next 55 years there.

    When she started, she was caring for veterans of the Spanish-American War of 1898.

    “One man was 93 and worked for the state, and he was still working,” she recalls. “He was my inspiration. Another man was a stockbroker, and in 1929 he watched all his friends jump out of windows on Wall Street.”

    Molly has built relationships with patients from many wars. She has the most affection for Vietnam veterans because they were treated so poorly by the public when they returned home.

    One Vietnam vet, Ed Henry, was ambushed by machine gun fire at age 19 and had both legs amputated. Molly helped Henry in many ways, even filing paperwork to get him better compensation. Henry grew to trust Molly and rely on her. He’d bring in other vets who were reluctant to get care and escort them right to Molly’s office.

     After Henry died in 2012, one of the first people his wife called was Molly.

    “He had a lot of faith in Molly,” said Linda Henry, “in her judgment and kindness and just her.”

    Molly was working in a VA clinic in Center City, Philadelphia, the second day of August in 1976 when a veteran she had been dating, a member of the American Legion, came in and told her that many fellow Legionnaires attending a convention at a nearby hotel the previous week were sick and four had died.

    She called the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta, and the doctor there told her he needed more information. So Molly called the state Legion office and found out that, in fact, 11 had died.

    “I called back to this doctor at the CDC,” Molly says, “and I said there are 11 dead, and I can hear him in my head right now, his saying, ‘Oh my god!’” Molly believes she was instrumental in sounding the alarm about Legionnaires’ with the CDC, although all these years later it’s hard to say who was first. Pennsylvania health authorities were already on the case.

    Molly helped start the HIV-AIDS program at the VA in 1989, when few health professionals wanted anything to do with the deadly disease. She made a point of shaking hands with every patient. “People have to be told you’re not afraid of them,” she says. “I saw so many die,” she says of those early days. She felt a true sense of purpose in the AIDS program, and that’s where she stayed.

    “She is the face of taking care of patients with HIV here, period,” said Jo Ann Seppelt, a nurse manager and Molly’s supervisor. “I don’t know how we’re going to replace her. Actually, we can’t replace her. It’s not just taking care of patients. It’s the passion behind it.”

    The HIV program is part of the infectious diseases clinic, and Molly cared for patients with a variety of illnesses. As care and treatments have improved, Molly’s gotten to know many clinic patients for more than 20 years.

    Julia Kent, 58, one of those clinic patients, came in the other day — Molly’s second to last — just to give her a present.

    “I don’t want Molly to go, and I wanted to do this for her. We’ve been through so much,” Kent explained as Molly unwrapped a green wool scarf Kent had knitted just for her.

    “Oh, that’s beautiful!” Molly said.

    Molly tried it on, over her white nursing coat.

    “For when you travel the world in the cold weather,” Kent said.

    Molly’s first trip, planned for February, is to Venice.

    “Please keep in touch. Send me postcards,” Kent said.

    “Listen, I’ll never forget you,” said Molly. “And I have the scarf to prove it.”

    Postscript: Molly, who said she was retiring because she was “tired of getting up at 6 a.m.,” announced on her first day of retirement, “I slept in till 10 o’clock this morning.” But quickly added, “I don’t expect to do that every morning, you understand.”

    Why not? She’s earned it.

    http://news.yahoo.com/the-amazing-and-inspiring-career-of-molly-mclaughlin--va-hospital-nurse-190808245.html


    Offline poche

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    The oldest person?
    « Reply #71 on: January 23, 2016, 01:24:07 AM »
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  • After the death this week of the world's oldest man in Japan, the title will likely be passed on to 112-year-old Holocaust survivor Yisrael Kristal in Haifa, Israel.

    Kristal's relatives were contacted by the Gerontology Research Group, a U.S.-based organization keeping records on the world's "supercentenatirans," or those older than 110. To be certified as the world's oldest man, the Polish-born Kristal must provide documentation of his age, something he lacks prior to the age of 25, when he was married.
     
    A candy maker from Lodz, Poland, born in 1903, he was sent to the Nazi concentration camp in Auschwitz in 1944. His wife died there.

    He remarried in 1947, settled in Israel with his second wife in 1950 and resumed his career as a confectioner. The son of a Torah scholar, Kristal has been religiously observant all his life.

    Interviewed in 2012 at the age of 109, Kristal said the grace of God was the sole key to longevity.

    My father is someone who is always happy. He is optimistic, wise, and he values what he has," his daughter, Shula Kuperstoch, told the Jerusalem Post. "His attitude to life is everything in moderation. He eats and sleeps moderately, and says that a person should always be in control of their own life and not have their life control them."

    The Gerontology Research Group says the world's current oldest woman is Susannah Mushatt Jones of Alabama, who is 116.

    http://www.upi.com/Top_News/World-News/2016/01/22/112-year-old-Holocaust-survivor-believed-to-be-worlds-oldest-man/9631453466037/

    Offline poche

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    The oldest person?
    « Reply #72 on: March 07, 2017, 01:29:33 AM »
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  • She is one of the oldest religious sisters in the world, but this week, she turned 110 years young.

    Despite her advanced age, Sister Candida Bellotti retains the enthusiasm of a young woman. On Monday, Feb. 20, she celebrated her 110th birthday and received a special message from Pope Francis.


    “To the Reverend Sister Candida Bellotti, Sister Minister of the Sick, who with gratitude to God is celebrating her 110th birthday, the Holy Father Francis spiritually participates in the joy we all share for this happy occasion and sends warm congratulations and heartfelt wishes,” said the pontiff in his message.

    At age 80, Pope Francis is 30 years her junior.

    Sister Bellotti celebrated her birthday with the Bishop of the Italian Diocese of Lucca, Benvenuto Italo Castellani. She resides in the diocese along with the convent's sisters and the provincial superior, Sister Giuliana Fracasso.


    In a recent interview, she said that her vocation was “sown” in a Christian family.

    “Love, love and love still more, with joy,” is the advice she gives everyone, especially the new generations. She has a special invitation for young people: “Have confidence in the future, and strive to the utmost to accomplish your desires.”

    Sister Bellotti belongs to the Congregation of San Camillus de Lellis, which this year observes the 150th anniversary of the death of its founder, Blessed Maria Domenica Brun Barbantini.

    The 110-year-old sister was born in Quinzano, in the Italian province of Verona, on February 20, 1907. Since the 1930s, she has dedicated herself to serving those in need as a professional nurse in various Italian cities. Since the year 2000 she has been living Lucca, at her congregation's mother house.

    http://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/this-110-year-old-nun-got-birthday-greetings-from-pope-francis-93431/

    Offline poche

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    Re: The oldest person?
    « Reply #73 on: October 01, 2017, 12:24:31 AM »
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  • Sister Crucita has been a member of the Josephine Sisters in Mexico for 70 years. At nearly 100 years old, she says she is happy with her vocation and would not change her decision to give her life to God.
     In an interview with CNA, Sister Crucita – whose full religious name is Sister Maria of the Royal Cross – said that the secret of her perseverance has always been her trust in the mercy of God and the support of the Blessed Virgin Mary.
     “I say to the Blessed Virgin Mary, 'Take care of me, you already know I'm yours. Deliver me from the snares of the devil.' The Blessed Virgin has taken great care of me,” she said.
     Through the Holy Rosary she was able to persevere in face of the temptation to abandon the religious life on many occasions, she said.
     “One of the strongest temptations was to want to leave the religious life, because there were a lot of difficulties at the hospital where I was. The doctors encouraged me to leave, but I trusted in God and the Blessed Virgin. And here I am, thanks to them,” she said. Sister Crucita was born Nov. 23, 1917 in the El Oro municipality in Mexico State. From a very young age, she had a love for Christ and the Church, thanks to the devotion of her parents who took her to Mass.
     “I always liked going to Mass. I had an uncle who was a sacristan and I liked to spend time with him. So I was always drawn to the things of the Lord,” she said.
     She began thinking about a religious vocation after a group of religious sisters came to her home town. She even discerned with a cloistered convent, but was forced to return home after two years, due to an illness.  
     Sister Crucita was introduced to the Josephine Sisters by a priest. She worked alongside the sisters at a local hospital for a few months, and then entered the novitiate.
     On Aug. 15, 1947, Sister Crucita made her final vows as a Josephine sister, at 30 years of age. Currently she goes to confession about every two weeks, prays the Holy Rosary three or four times a day, and attends Mass daily.
     She said her religious vocation was always tied to her profession as a nurse.
     At the start of the 1950s, Sister Crucita was sent to her congregation's hospital in Cuba. Later, in 1952, she arrived in Guadalajara and was assigned as a nurse to the Civil Hospital. For many years she was the supervisor of the pediatrics department.
     “I see how the sick suffer and there are many who offer everything to God, they don't complain or anything. So then I think, if they who are sick and are always thinking about God, then what can I complain about. Anything on my part is something passing and I offer it to the Lord,” she emphasized.
     Sister María de la Cruz said that one of her secrets to keep on going has always been to feel welcomed by the mercy of God: “I know that He loves me much more than I love him. I have always thought that He seeks me, he calls me, that he is always with me. If something happens to me, He watches over me.”
     She encouraged young people to trust “completely in God, in the love that He has for us” because “He helps us and gives us peace.”
     On Nov. 23, at Our Lady of Bethlehem and Saint Michael the Archangel church, a Mass of Thanksgiving will be celebrated for Sister Crucita’s 100th birthday.
     Sister Beatriz Escamilla, a 44-year-old Josephine sister, said that at nearly 100 years old, Sister Crucita is still very independent.
     “She begins her routine at 5:00 am, because she moves at a slower pace, and then she comes to the chapel at 7:00 am. She is one of the most punctual sisters, and sometimes she beats us all there. Sometimes she's the one who opens up the chapel,” Sister Beatriz said.  
     She also highlighted Sister Crucita's fervent prayer for “vocations and for those of us still working in the apostolate.”
     “She has an hour dedicated to prayer in front of the Blessed Sacrament to especially ask for these needs,” she said.
     Whenever things at the hospital get difficult, Sister Beatriz said, she can always count on Sister Crucita for encouragement.
     “She's a person you're drawn to, through the peace she conveys. She offers a lesson in joy, perseverance, dedication and sacrifice,” she concluded.
     
     https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/...says-88872

    Offline poche

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    Re: The oldest person?
    « Reply #74 on: November 25, 2017, 01:35:42 AM »
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  • At age 113, Sister André is one of the oldest religious sisters in the world.
     According to French newspaper Le Parisien, Sister André is the oldest person in France. She told the newspaper that this “very much surprised me because I never even thought about it.”
     Sister André, who is blind, currently resides in the Sainte-Catherine-Labouré retirement home for religious in Toulon, a city in southeast France near the Mediterranean.
     She was born Lucille Randon on Feb. 11, 1904 in the town of Alès , about 140 miles northwest of Toulon. The nun told the French daily La Croix that she grew up in a poor Protestant family. Her paternal grandfather was “a pastor, very strict. The services lasted forever and you had to follow the entire sermon without budging or falling asleep! So my parents no longer practiced their religion. But that troubled me.”
     When she was 27, she converted to Catholicism. “I gradually progressed, following my Catholic faith,” she said.
     During her youth, she worked as a teacher and governess for various families including the Peugeots, who founded and owned the French car manufacturer.
     At age 40, she joined the Daughters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul and took the name André in honor of her brother André, whom she said was like a parent to her.
     After World War II began, the nun started working in a hospital in the town of Vichy in central France, taking care of the elderly and children.
     “Some of them were orphans, some placed there by their parents because they were no longer able to feed them,” she recalled.
     Sister André cared for children in that hospital for nearly 30 years, and said that “some of them have looked me up and still come to see me.”
     In 2009, the nun moved into the Sainte-Catherine-Labouré retirement home in Toulon.
     “I am really fortunate to be here, because I'm very well cared for here,” she said. “That's very reassuring at my age.”
     “When my brothers died when I was 70, I thought that it would be my turn soon,” she said. But several decades later, she is still alive, and grateful for all the blessings God has continued to send her.
     Sister André told La Croix that she worked until she was 104 years old. What she misses now is that she can no longer “read, write, draw, embroider and knit.” However, she said that she still enjoys experiencing the nice weather.
     “The good Lord has guided me well,” she reflected.
     
     
     https://www.catholicnewsagency.com/news/...ings-14217

     

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