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Online poche

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The oldest person?
« on: August 15, 2013, 12:16:23 AM »
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  • If Bolivia's public records are correct, Carmelo Flores Laura is the oldest living person ever documented.

    They say he turned 123 a month ago.

    The native Aymara lives in a straw-roofed dirt-floor hut in an isolated hamlet near Lake Titicaca at 13,100 feet (4,000 meters), is illiterate, speaks no Spanish and has no teeth.

    He walks without a cane and doesn't wear glasses. And though he speaks the Aymara language with a firm voice, one must speak directly into his ear to be heard.

    "I see a bit dimly. I had good vision before. But I saw you coming," he tells a group of journalists who visited after a local TV report about him.

    http://news.yahoo.com/bolivia-records-aymara-herder-123-years-old-202553434.html

    Wouldn't you like to live so long?

    Offline Frances

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    The oldest person?
    « Reply #1 on: August 15, 2013, 01:04:02 AM »
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  •  :scratchchin:
    I'm not sure I'd like to outlive all my family and friends, a definite possibility since I'm unmarried and have no children.  If I did live way over 100, I'd prefer if my mind were still good. If my body still worked, all the better.  I think it highly unlikely I will live so long.  Too much stress, city life not conducive to longevity.  It's in God's Hands.  I don't worry how long I live, just that I live well and die in a state of grace.
     St. Francis Xavier threw a Crucifix into the sea, at once calming the waves.  Upon reaching the shore, the Crucifix was returned to him by a crab with a curious cross pattern on its shell.  


    Offline Matto

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    The oldest person?
    « Reply #2 on: August 15, 2013, 01:29:56 PM »
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  • I remember reading an old thread on cathinfo about the oldest person ever. The person this thread talked about lived in England a long time ago and he lived to be older than this person.
    In a Station of the Metro
    The apparition of these faces in the crowd;
    Petals on a wet, black bough.

    Offline Telesphorus

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    The oldest person?
    « Reply #3 on: August 15, 2013, 01:32:13 PM »
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  • Offline Matto

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    The oldest person?
    « Reply #4 on: August 15, 2013, 01:34:53 PM »
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  • Thanks for finding the link, Tele.
    In a Station of the Metro
    The apparition of these faces in the crowd;
    Petals on a wet, black bough.


    Online poche

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    The oldest person?
    « Reply #5 on: August 17, 2013, 05:23:21 AM »
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  • In today's fast-paced world, changing jobs multiple times throughout your career is the norm, and job-hopping is only becoming more frequent. According to a 2012 survey, the majority of Generation Y workers move on to a new gig an average of once every two years. Getting the under-30 set to wrap their heads around staying with one company for 5 or 10 years is tough enough … so how about 72 years? That's the milestone a 99-year-old New Jersey man hit recently.

    This summer, Hy Goldman, a World War II Army vet, marked his 72nd anniversary working for the family-owned lighting retailer Capitol Lighting. Though his first job was chopping ice before school for the local "ice guy" when he was just 14, Goldman took a position selling goods as well as stocking and cleaning displays in 1941 at Capitol Lighting's first store, in Newark, New Jersey, at age 27, and has been with the company ever since. More than seven decades later, Goldman is still going strong, working at Capitol's East Hanover, New Jersey, location, just 15 miles from the Newark shop that kicked off his career.

    Goldman shared some stories, his thoughts on the modern world, and a few secrets to longevity with Yahoo! Shine. (Rule #1: Learn math without a calculator.) He turns 100 on Saturday.

    http://shine.yahoo.com/healthy-living/what-s-it-like-to-work-for-the-same-company-for-72-years--202309703.html

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    The oldest person?
    « Reply #6 on: August 22, 2013, 11:34:26 PM »
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  • They're called "super agers" — men and women who are in their 80s and 90s, but with brains and memories that seem far younger.

    Researchers are looking at this rare group in the hope that they may find ways to help protect others from memory loss. And they've had some tantalizing findings: Imaging tests have found unusually low amounts of age-related plaques along with more brain mass related to attention and memory in these elite seniors.

    "We're living long but we're not necessarily living well in our older years and so we hope that the SuperAging study can find factors that are modifiable and that we'll be able to use those to help people live long and live well," said study leader Emily Rogalski, a neuroscientist at Northwestern University's cognitive neurology and Alzheimer's disease center in Chicago.

    The study is still seeking volunteers, but chances are you don't qualify: Fewer than 10 percent of would-be participants have met study criteria.

    "We've screened over 400 people at this point and only about 35 of them have been eligible for this study, so it really represents a rare portion of the population," Rogalski said.

    They include an octogenarian attorney, a 96-year-old retired neuroscientist, a 92-year-old Holocaust survivor and an 81-year-old pack-a-day smoker who drinks a nightly martini.

    To qualify, would-be participants have to undergo a battery of mental tests. Once enrolled, they undergo periodic imaging scans and other medical tests. They also must be willing to donate their brains after death.

    The memory tests include lists of about 15 words. "Super agers can remember at least nine of them 30 minutes later, which is really impressive because often older adults in their 80s can only remember just a couple," Rogalski said.

    Special MRI scans have yielded other remarkable clues, Rogalski said. They show that in super agers, the brain's cortex, or outer layer, responsible for many mental functions including memory, is thicker than in typical 80- and 90-year-olds. And deep within the brain, a small region called the anterior cingulate, important for attention, is bigger than even in many 50- and 60-year-olds.

    The super agers aren't just different on the inside; they have more energy than most people their age and share a positive, inquisitive outlook. Rogalski said the researchers are looking into whether those traits contribute to brain health.



    Other research has linked a positive attitude with overall health. And some studies have suggested that people who are "cognitively active and socially engaged" have a reduced chance of developing Alzheimer's disease, but which comes first — a healthy brain or a great attitude — isn't known, said Heather Snyder, director of medical and scientific operations for the Alzheimer's Association.

    Snyder said the SuperAging study is an important effort that may help provide some answers.

    Edith Stern is among the super agers. The petite woman looks far younger than her 92 years, and is a vibrant presence at her Chicago retirement home, where she acts as a sort of room mother, volunteering in the gift shop, helping residents settle in and making sure their needs are met.

    Stern lost most of her family in the Holocaust and takes her work seriously.

    "What I couldn't do for my parents, I try to do for the residents in the home," she said, her voice still thick with the accent of her native Czechoslovakia.

    most people at the home, even many younger residents.

    "I am young — inside. And I think that's the difference," she said.

    "I grasp fast," she adds. "If people say something, they don't have to tell me twice. I don't forget it."

    She's different in other ways, too.

    "When you get old, people are mainly interested in themselves. They talk about the doctor, what hurts," she said. "You are not so important that you just concentrate on yourself. You have to think about other people."

    Study participant Don Tenbrunsel has a similar mindset. The 85-year-old retired businessman doesn't think of himself as a super ager. "Neither do my children," he says, chuckling.

    But Tenbrunsel says his memory has been sharp "from the time I was born. My mother used to say, 'Donald, come sing with me — not because I had a good voice, but because I always knew the words," he said. "I think I'm just lucky, not only with respect to my memory, but I'm able to get around very well; I walk a lot and I have a pretty good attitude toward life itself."

    Tenbrunsel volunteers several hours a week at a food pantry run by the Chicago church where he is a parishioner. One recent morning in the sun-filled rectory kitchen, he nimbly packaged ham and cheese sandwiches, set out bags of chips and cans of soda, and cheerfully greeted a steady stream of customers.

    "Good morning, good to see you," he said, standing at the pantry's bright red door. He gave everyone their choice of chips — a small gesture but important, he said, because it gives them some sense of control over their hard-luck lives.
    "I enjoy doing it. I probably get more out of it than I give," Tenbrunsel said.

    Ken Zwiener, of Deerfield, Ill., is another super ager. He had "more than an inkling" he might qualify for the study, and his kids encouraged him to enroll.

    "They said, 'Dad, your brain is the best thing about you,'" the 81-year-old retired businessman recalled.

    He's a golfer and Broadway musical "nut" who created a 300-plus-page computer database of shows. Zwiener uses an iPad, recently went hot-air ballooning and is trying to learn Spanish.

    He also pours himself a vodka martini every night and is a pack-a-day cigarette smoker, but says he doesn't think his habits have made much difference. His healthy brain, he says, may be due to heredity and genes, but Zwiener said he hopes the study comes up with more "scientific insights".

    "My dad lived into his middle 90s and was pretty sharp right up until the day he died," Zwiener said.

    Zwiener's motivation for joining the study was simple: The best man at his wedding died of Alzheimer's disease before age 50.

    "To lose a mind ... is just a terrible way to go," he said.

    http://news.yahoo.com/study-seeks-super-agers-secrets-brain-health-071524341.html


    Offline Elizabeth

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    The oldest person?
    « Reply #7 on: September 06, 2013, 09:32:40 AM »
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  • My Dad is a "super ager".  I pray he will start super co-operating with Gods' Will and use the brain God gave him as He intended.


    Online poche

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    The oldest person?
    « Reply #8 on: September 14, 2013, 03:22:15 AM »
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  • The world's oldest living human being today is 115-year-old Misao Okawa from Japan. If Ethiopia's Dhaqabo Ebba claim is indeed true, he's far ahead of Okawa - and all legally recorded human births. This would make Ebba 46 years older than the oldest ever recorded man.

    Ebba provided so much detail on the history of his local area that reporter Mohammed Ademo became convinced that Ebba must be at least 160 years old. Ademo made that statement on Oromiya TV.
     
    "When Italy invaded Ethiopia I had two wives,and my son was old enough to herd cattle," Ebba said.

    Ebba then recounted his eight-day horseback rides to Addis Ababa as a child, which is a journey that takes only a few hours today.

    Ebba, having grown up in an oral society, there are no paper trails and no living witnesses to verify his age.

    Ebba would also overtake French woman Jeanne Calment as the oldest person to have ever lived. Calment claimed to have remembered painter Vincent Van Gogh in her native village. Calment also lived a rarefied existence, having never worked a day in her life. She died aged 122 years and 164 days in 1997.

    The last man confirmed to have lived in the 19th century was Jiroemon Kimura, who was born in Japan on April 19, 1897. He died in June this year at the age of 116, making him the longest-living man in history.

    From Kyotango, Japan, Kimura left behind seven children, 14 grandchildren, 25 great-grandchildren and 15 great-great-grandchildren.

    Japan has more than 50,000 centenarians, reinforcing its reputation for longevity

    http://catholic.org/international/international_story.php?id=52378

    Online poche

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    The oldest person?
    « Reply #9 on: September 14, 2013, 11:56:54 PM »
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  • The world's oldest man, a gin rummy-playing, one-time sugarcane worker born in Spain, has died at 112 in New York state, a funeral home said on Saturday.

    Salustiano "Shorty" Sanchez, recognized by Guinness World Records as the world's oldest man, died on Friday at a nursing home in Grand Island, New York, the M.J. Colucci & Son Funeral Chapels said on its website.

    Guinness said in June that Sanchez, who also had been a construction worker, was the oldest man following the death of 116-year-old Jiroemon Kimura of Japan.

    Sanchez credited his longevity to eating one banana per day and taking Anacin daily, according to a recent Guinness online profile.

    He told Guinness that living so long was not a special accomplishment.

    Sanchez was born in El Tejado de Bejar, Spain, in 1901 and worked as a sugarcane field worker in Cuba before emigrating to the United States, where he found work in Kentucky coal mines.

    Sanchez liked to garden, do crossword puzzles, and play gin rummy every night with friends, according to Guinness.

    Sanchez was known for his musical talents as a boy, playing a dulzania, a Spanish double reed instrument related to the oboe, Guinness said. He went to school until age 10.

    Sanchez moved to the Niagara Falls area of New York state in the early 1930s and became a construction worker. He worked for Union Carbide Co for more than 30 years before retiring.

    He married his wife, Pearl, in 1934. Sanchez had two children, seven grandchildren, 15 great-grandchildren and five great-great grandchildren, according to Guinness.

    With his death, the world's oldest man is Arturo Licata of Italy at 111, and the oldest woman is Misao Okawa of Japan at 115, according to the Gerontology Research Group, which tracks people 110 and older and validates ages for Guinness.

    The greatest authenticated age for any human is 122 years, 164 days by Jeanne Louise Calment of France.

    http://news.yahoo.com/worlds-oldest-man-dies-112-york-state-022815259.html

    I want to be the oldest person someday.
     :cheers: :cheers: :cheers:

    Online poche

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    The oldest person?
    « Reply #10 on: September 30, 2013, 11:41:11 PM »
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  • According to a story published recently in the New York Times, 103-year-old Harry Rosen credits his long life with a love of fine dining. Every evening, he visits one of his favorite Manhattan restaurants. “The food and the ambiance, it’s my therapy — it gives me energy,” he told the paper. Rosen also gets chatty with people sitting at nearby tables and remarkably lies about his age. “They always ask my age, and I often lie and tell them I’m 90,” he said. “If I tell them my real age, it becomes the whole subject of conversation and makes it look like I’m looking for attention, which I’m not.”

    Rosen isn't the only centenarian who attributes his longevity to diet. In July, the Guinness Book of World Records welcomed the oldest living man into its annals, 112-year-old Salustiano Sanchez Blazquez of Spain. He died in September, however, according to a story published in the Daily Mail, Sanchez Blazquez credited his long life to eating one plantain a day. And then there's 105-year-old Pearl Cantrell. The mother of seven told Today that three slices of bacon ("It's gotta be crispy") is the reason for her youthful glow. On her most recent birthday, after learning of her love for bacon, representatives from Oscar Mayer paid her a visit and let her ride "shotbun" in their Weinermobile."


    What makes people live so long — nature or nurture? "The average person should be able to live to 90 years old if they exercise, eat well, and avoid smoking,” Thomas Perls, M.D., a professor of medicine at Boston Medical Center, the director of the New England Centenarian study, and co-author of Living to 100, told Yahoo Shine. “Before the age of 90, genetics only accounts for 25 percent of a person’s lifespan; 75 percent is their healthy habits. If a person lives past 90, we have to look to a stronger genetic reason.”  Here’s how four other people over 100 keep the good times rolling.


    Have a boss: At 108 years old, Irving Kahn still holds down a job as a New York City investment adviser, arising at 7:00 a.m. each morning and commuting to his office on Madison Avenue five days a week. Kahn, who outlived his 106-year-old brother Peter and older sister Helen, 110, is currently participating in a study of centenarians at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx. “There are a lot of opportunities out there, and one shouldn’t complain, unless you don’t have good health,” Kahn told The Daily Beast in 2011. And while Kahn clearly loves his 9 to 5, according to Howard Friedman, Ph.D., distinguished professor of psychology at the University of California, Riverside and co-author of The Longevity Project, a dream job isn't a must, in order to live longer. “Our studies show that people who don’t necessarily love their jobs, still live longer because they have a greater purpose and contribute to a greater good every day,” he says.

    Indulge your silly side: 100-year-old Kathleen Connell sure does. According to a story published on Yahoo News in 2012, the grandmother of one received her first Nintendo DS as a gift on her 96th birthday and never looked back (she bought a second device since she "wore out" the first). Connell plays for two hours a day and says the games are the reason she doesn't "feel a day over 80."

    Hit the slopes: Elsa Baily, is a 100-year-old former occupational therapist and avid skier who attributes simple health habits to reaching her golden years. “Be active. I do things my way, like skiing when I’m 100. Nobody else does that even if they have energy. And I try to eat pretty correctly, and get exercise and fresh air and sunshine,” Baily told ABC News in May. She has the right idea. According to one study published in the journal PLOS One, exercise such as brisk walking for 75 minutes per week is associated with a gain of 1.8 years in life expectancy.

    Marry a younger guy: Daisy Dunnett, 100, says her second husband, David 33 years her junior, keeps her young, according to story published by SWNS. The fact that David wasn’t even born when Dunnett gave birth to her third child is small potatoes to the couple, who dated for nine years before tying the knot. “I really think I would be dead if it was not for him. If you’re elderly and on your own it is easy to give up," said Daisy. "He gives me a reason to enjoy life to the fullest." Daisy and David could be onto something — one 2012 study published in The Journal of Research in Personality found that while married people aren’t necessarily happier than their single counterparts, marriage is a safeguard against “normal declines in happiness” in adulthood. "We've seen from multi-generational studies that young people have a positive effect on the elderly, but the impact is a two-way street," says Perls.

    http://shine.yahoo.com/healthy-living/quirky-secrets-to-living-past-100-190626973.html


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    « Reply #11 on: October 12, 2013, 11:52:40 PM »
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  • In the near future, advances in biomedical technology will enable citizens of developed countries to live dramatically longer lives. The revolution in biomedicine stands poised to eclipse even the social and economic effects of information technology.


    Right now, it’s hard to believe that a radically extended life is possible, especially after many failed promises in the past.

    But for the first time, it has become possible to speculate, with some degree of certainty, that this dream could be achieved within our lifetimes. I outline some of these trends in my book, The Ageless Generation: How Advances in Biomedicine Will Transform the Global Economy.

    Of course, there is disbelief and skepticism, even among some of the world’s top experts.

    Biomedical innovations typically reach the mass market much more slowly than those produced by information technology. Consumer demand cannot significantly accelerate the process. Nevertheless, many advances made over the past three decades are already propagating into mainstream clinical practice and converging with other technologies to extend our life spans.

    Consider these facts:

    •More than $1 trillion has been spent on biomedical research over the past 20 years. These investments should soon start yielding longevity dividends.

    •The number of scientists working on extending the life span world-wide has increased exponentially as computer and communications technologies have entered the mainstream and China and India have joined the race.

    •The life spans of some laboratory animals have already been extended more than tenfold.

    •Innovations have already started: vital organs have been grown from patients’ own cells and several stem-cell therapies are being proven.

    •Cancer survival rates have increased steadily over the past few years. A diagnosis is no longer a certain death sentence.

    •Advances in laboratory diagnostics and biometrics are already providing valuable insight into disease prevention.

    •Fast-food outlets have started offering healthier dishes and displaying caloric content and smoking rates in developed countries have declined.

    Many people would not interpret these seven facts as a single trend leading to dramatic increases in life expectancy because the long-term effects are so unpredictable. But just two decades ago, nobody could imagine the possibility of the technology we use daily now.
    The possibility of a radically longer life is very real.

    Surprisingly, though, most people do not want to have their life spans extended. According to a recent survey by the Pew Research Center, 56% of adult respondents in the U.S. would not want to undergo medical treatments to slow the aging process and enable them to live to 120 or longer.

    In my opinion, this pessimistic view stems from several factors. First, when forming a conscious and subconscious opinion about life expectancy, most people use as benchmarks their parents’ and grandparents’ life spans, and the national average. The line of thought is usually: I am 40, my grandmother lived to 92, my dad is 70, and I heard that the average is about 78, so I should live to somewhere between 80 and 95. But I am not sure if I want to live that long, because my grandmother was very frail in her later years.

    These perceptions are fostered by researchers who look at historic trends and project only marginal increases, or even decreases, in future life expectancy. These researchers predict that recent behavioral changes, like high-calorie diets and sedentary lifestyles, as well as pollution and other environmental factors, will outweigh life-extending advances in biomedical sciences. But the past 20 years have demonstrated that those relying on historical trends to make predictions about science and technology are often proven wrong.

    People may also believe an extended life span will extend frailty and boredom in old age. But biomedical advances are not all the same. The current paradigm in biomedical research, clinical regulation and health care has created a spur of costly procedures that provide only marginal increases late in life. The vast percentage of lifetime health care costs today are spent in the past few years of patients’ lives, increasing the burden on the economy and society and further contributing to the negative image of life extension.

    In the near future, however, the focus of biomedicine will shift to extending healthy, productive lives and keeping people young and occupied for as long as possible. In fact, this is probably one of the very few altruistic strategies for avoiding the possible global economic collapse triggered by the unbearable costs of supporting our retired populations. When faced with a simultaneous decline in birthrates and an increase in the number of retirees, governments of developed countries will realize that investing in regenerative medicine and encouraging life-long learning and career planning are better strategies than implementing massive austerity measures and boosting immigration.

    The preventive approaches available today, including improved diet and exercise and more advanced early diagnostics, may have the potential to add 10 to 20 years to our life spans. But future generations will more likely rely on biomedical interventions to prevent the loss of functionality with age and to maintain or even improve their performance on all levels. The lowest-hanging fruit is regenerative medicine, which will likely allow most of the organs in the body to be replaced or rejuvenated.

    The benefits of becoming ageless

    There is a big difference between thinking “I am 50, but I feel like 30 and expect to live to 80” and “I am 50, but I expect to be healthy until 150.” As our life spans extend, we will need to change our approach to getting older.

    What does it mean to age without getting “old”? The brilliant psychologist Laura Carstensen, founding director of the Stanford Center on Longevity, was one of the first to propose and develop a life span theory of motivation called Socioemotional Selectivity Theory. According to Dr. Carstensen, our life span time horizons affect our motivation, behavior, risk taking and cognitive processing. For example, individuals with shorter perceived life expectancies will divert resources from investments intended for the future to pursue short-term goals and pleasures.

    There are clear benefits, then, in proactively stretching your expected life horizon to a number much greater than your can currently imagine. It will probably not only make you look and feel younger, but also induce the behavioral patterns of someone more youthful, enabling you to interact with younger and older people without barriers and remain productive longer than your peers.

    Another benefit of setting the bar toward 120, 150 or beyond is minimizing financial risk. This will most certainly lead more of us to postpone retirement and set a course for continuous improvement, lifelong learning and active career planning.

    There is definitely no harm in stretching your “ageometer” to 150. Most likely technology will catch up and exceed your expectations. The worst that can happen is you will die earlier feeling much younger than you ever thought you would.

    About the author: Alex Zhavoronkov, Ph.D., the author of The Ageless Generation: How Advances in Biomedicine Will Transform the Global Economy, is the director and a trustee of the Biogerontology Research Foundation, a U.K.-based think tank supporting aging research world-wide.

    http://www.marketwatch.com/story/yes-you-can-be-120-years-old-and-love-it-2013-10-12?pagenumber=2

    Online poche

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    « Reply #12 on: November 06, 2013, 04:45:53 AM »
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  • It's hard to forget Elsa Bailey, the 100-year-old whippersnapper who wanted nothing more than to celebrate her 100th birthday last May by hitting the ski slopes at Arapahoe Basin Ski Area in Keystone, Colo., just as she did when she turned 90, for one final whirl down the mountain.

    But Bailey's adventures certainly didn't end on her birthday. The tenacious centurion just fulfilled another huge accomplishment from her bucket list, to take a trip to see real-life polar bears in the wild.

    "It was wonderful," Bailey, of Colorado Springs, told GoodMorningAmerica.com of her surprise trip to the tundra. "I've always loved animals, ever since I was down in Tanzania years ago watching their migration."

    A self-proclaimed lifelong rebel, Bailey has "done a lot of fun things" during her extremely active existence, but seeing polar bears in the wild was one adventure she had yet to conquer.

    Coincidentally, an employee of Natural Habitat Adventures, a company that helps organize polar bear tours, had been on the slopes the same day Bailey was celebrating her 100 th birthday, and later that night while watching the news, heard Bailey admit "she still had a bucket list, and atop it was her desire to see polar bears in the wild," Andrea Reynolds, the tour guide who accompanied Bailey on her trip, wrote on a blog detailing their adventure.

    The group decided to surprise Bailey with a week-long trip to Churchill, Manitoba in October, an experience she says she'll never forget.

    "I've wanted to see polar bears for years," said Bailey. "When the opportunity came, I jumped at it," especially, she notes, because the group she went with was "so nice, so helpful, and they made things as easy as they could for an old-timer like me."

    Bailey traveled around the tundra in "these great big tremendous vehicles they call polar rovers," she recalled, with windows on both sides for her to peer out of telescopes to help her spot the bears.

    "We were looking for them and saw them coming," she said. "They're so used to these polar rovers they just came down and began playing together right in front of me. They're such wonderful animals, but in this season they sometimes get bored because there's nothing for them to do, so they just play together, which was magnificent."

    One of the highlights of her trip, however, was a different animal - the sled dogs. Bailey got to ride along with a professional dog musher for an exhilarating half an hour.

    "It was wonderful tearing along behind the dogs through fresh snow and through the woods," she said. "I got a front seat."

    Now that Bailey is back home, she's already got her eyes set on her next bucket list endeavor.

    "Yellowstone," she said without hesitation. "I've wanted to go there for years. I just want to look. Apparently, it is a great big geyser with a lot of hot magma underneath and I'd love to see that. It must be glorious."

    http://gma.yahoo.com/blogs/abc-blogs/100-old-woman-fulfills-bucket-list-dream-see-204329354--abc-news-travel.html

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    « Reply #13 on: December 31, 2013, 04:54:50 AM »
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  • Nordstrom's only greeter, who has worked for the company for more than 14 years, turned 100 today.

     
    Related StoriesTed DiNunzio has worked at the Nordstrom department store in Arcadia, Calif., about 15 miles northeast of Los Angeles, since he was 86 years old.

    On Friday, the company celebrated his birthday with nearly 1,000 cupcakes, some of which spelled out the number 100.

    Some 14 years ago, the manager asked him to have a cup of coffee and offered him a job to be a store greeter. He works now on Fridays and Saturdays from about 10 to 5, with a one-hour lunch break and 10-minute rest period.

    DiNunzio is the only greeter of Nordstrom's 261 stores in 35 states, a spokesman for Nordstrom confirmed.

    When asked whether he will ever stop working at Nordstrom, he has said, "I will keep on working until I can't work anymore."

    DiNunzio previously said the key to longevity is eating lot of vegetables and steak once in a while.

    "Faith and positive attitude, always smile and be happy, that's the secret," DiNunzio said during the 100th birthday celebration, KTLA reported.

    DiNunzio could not be reached for comment.

    John Bailey, a spokesman for Nordstrom, said the centenarian and his family were planning to have a small celebration on his actual birthday, but on Sunday, DiNunzio went to the race track, one of his favorite pastimes.

    Marcille Hughes, the store manager at Nordstrom Westfield Santa Anita, said in a statement, "Ted inspires others, he creates an environment that's welcoming and fun. "He has a belief that you need to treat people with kindness and smile. It works for him and works for all of us around him. He truly brightens everyone's day."

    http://news.yahoo.com/nordstrom-39-only-greeter-becomes-centenarian-005438244.html

    Offline Neil Obstat

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    The oldest person?
    « Reply #14 on: December 31, 2013, 11:33:12 AM »
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    It's really funny, to see all these worldly quips from the faithless MSM saying that such-and-such is the oldest authenticated age and the longest recorded lifespan, etc.  

    Not too long ago families kept records of births, marriages and deaths in the family by writing them down in the family Bible.  There were several pages for that purpose left with blank spaces in new bibles.  

    And family bibles were used as the authentic record of when people were born, married, and died, among other things (baptism, first Holy Communion, Confirmation, Holy Orders).  

    Now, we see this:

    Quote from: poche

    The world's oldest man, a gin rummy-playing, one-time sugarcane worker born in Spain, has died at 112 in New York state, a funeral home said on Saturday.

    Salustiano "Shorty" Sanchez, recognized by Guinness World Records as the world's oldest man, died on Friday at a nursing home in Grand Island, New York, the M.J. Colucci & Son Funeral Chapels said on its website.




    Does Guinness World Records ever check family bibles for birth dates?  

    Probably not.  

    Because if they did, then they'd have to recognize the Bible for ages of people, and you know where that would end up?


    Quote
    Guinness said in June that Sanchez, who also had been a construction worker, was the oldest man following the death of 116-year-old Jiroemon Kimura of Japan.

    ...

    With his death, the world's oldest man is Arturo Licata of Italy at 111, and the oldest woman is Misao Okawa of Japan at 115, according to the Gerontology Research Group, which tracks people 110 and older and validates ages for Guinness.

    The greatest authenticated age for any human is 122 years, 164 days by Jeanne Louise Calment of France.
     


    The "greatest authenticated age for any human?"


    Gee... I wonder what constitutes "authenticated age?"


    Genesis chapter five:

    25  And Mathusala lived a hundred and eighty-seven years, and begot Lamech.
    26  And Mathusala lived after he begot Lamech, seven hundred and eighty-two years, and begot sons and daughters.
    27  And all the days of Mathusala were nine hundred and sixty-nine years, and he died.


    Now, we can't be having the Bible recognized as being literally true, can we?

    Or... can we?  Maybe it's not a problem with what the Bible says, but rather it's a problem with what we believe, and whether we are interested in pleasing God.


    "But without faith, it is impossible to please God" (Heb. xi. 6).


    Does Guinness World Records ever mention that?


    Probably not.


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