Author Topic: NORTH DAKOTA FARM KID in the Marines  (Read 583 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Cera

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 3400
  • Reputation: +1314/-788
  • Gender: Female
  • Pray for the consecration of Russia to Mary's I H
NORTH DAKOTA FARM KID in the Marines
« on: May 29, 2021, 03:51:34 PM »
  • Thanks!3
  • No Thanks!0
  • Dear Ma and Pa,
     
    I am well. Hope you are. Tell Brother Walt and Brother Elmer the Marine Corps beats working for old man Minch by a mile. Tell them to join up quick before all of the places are filled.

    I was restless at first because you get to stay in bed till nearly 6 a.m. But I am getting so I like to sleep late. Tell Walt and Elmer all you do before breakfast is smooth your cot, and shine some things.  No hogs to slop, feed to itch, mash to mix, wood to split, fire to lay. Practically nothing.
    Men got to shave but it is not so bad, there's warm water.

    Breakfast is strong on trimmings like fruit juice, cereal, eggs, bacon, etc, but kind of weak on chops, potatoes, ham, steak, fried eggplant, pie and other regular food, but tell Walt and Elmer you can always sit by the two city boys that live on coffee. Their food, plus yours, holds you until noon when you get fed again.  It's no wonder these city boys can't walk much.

    We go on 'route marches,' which the platoon sergeant says are long walks to harden us. If he thinks so, it's not my place to tell him different.  A 'route march' is about as far as to our mailbox at home.  Then the city guys get sore feet and we all ride back in trucks.
     
    The sergeant is like a school teacher. He nags a lot. The Captain is like the school board. Majors and colonels just ride around and frown.  They don't bother you none.  
     
    This next will kill Walt and Elmer with laughing.  I keep getting medals for shooting.  I don't know why.  The bulls-eye is near as big as a chipmunk head and don't move, and it ain't shooting at you like the Higgett boys at home.  All you got to do is lie there all comfortable and hit it.  You don't even load your own cartridges.  They come in boxes.
     
    Then we have what they call hand-to-hand combat training.  You get to wrestle with them city boys.  I have to be real careful though, they break real easy.  It ain't like fighting with that ole bull at home. I'm about the best they got in this except for that Tug Jordan from over in Silver Lake.  I only beat him once.  He joined up the same time as me, but I'm only 5'6" and 130 pounds and he's 6'8" and near 300 pounds dry.
     
    Be sure to tell Walt and Elmer to hurry and join before other fellers get onto this setup and come stampeding in.
     
    Your loving daughter,
    Alice
    Pray for the consecration of Russia to the Immaculate Heart of Mary

    Offline Matthew

    • Mod
    • *****
    • Posts: 26924
    • Reputation: +23146/-312
    • Gender: Male
    Re: NORTH DAKOTA FARM KID in the Marines
    « Reply #1 on: May 29, 2021, 03:59:41 PM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • Hahaha I like the twist ending.

    It's true that parenting is about preparing your kids to EXCEL at life -- whether that's the military, the seminary, or family life. You want them to be at least tough enough to handle it.

    Imagine trying a vocation when you never prayed at home. Or being expected to do work in ANY vocation when your parents never expected you to do any work around the home. It's a disaster.
    Feeling generous? Want to say "thank you"? Feel free to send gift(s) from my Amazon wishlist!
    https://www.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/25M2B8RERL1UO

    Start Amazon.com session by clicking this link, and my family and I get a commission on your purchase!


    Offline Yeti

    • Full Member
    • ***
    • Posts: 1403
    • Reputation: +646/-176
    • Gender: Male
    Re: NORTH DAKOTA FARM KID in the Marines
    « Reply #2 on: May 29, 2021, 07:28:40 PM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • Oh man this is hilarious! And it just keeps getting better the further you get through it.

    Offline SimpleMan

    • Sr. Member
    • ****
    • Posts: 2138
    • Reputation: +609/-127
    • Gender: Male
    Re: NORTH DAKOTA FARM KID in the Marines
    « Reply #3 on: May 29, 2021, 07:49:27 PM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • I did not see that ending coming AT ALL.  :jester: :jester: :jester:

    Made for a nice little laugh here on Saturday evening.  Thanks.

    Offline Cera

    • Sr. Member
    • ****
    • Posts: 3400
    • Reputation: +1314/-788
    • Gender: Female
    • Pray for the consecration of Russia to Mary's I H
    Re: NORTH DAKOTA FARM KID in the Marines
    « Reply #4 on: June 01, 2021, 02:22:04 PM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • As funny as it was, it was also a sad commentary on the feminization of society, as when Biden called for flight suits for pregnant women. What's next? Combat fatigues for pregnant women?
    Pray for the consecration of Russia to the Immaculate Heart of Mary


    Offline alaric

    • Sr. Member
    • ****
    • Posts: 2489
    • Reputation: +1895/-187
    • Gender: Male
    Re: NORTH DAKOTA FARM KID in the Marines
    « Reply #5 on: June 01, 2021, 07:48:53 PM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • I'm surprised "Alice" didn't have two "Ma's".  ::)

    Offline Meg

    • Hero Member
    • *****
    • Posts: 4137
    • Reputation: +2144/-2081
    • Gender: Female
    Re: NORTH DAKOTA FARM KID in the Marines
    « Reply #6 on: June 02, 2021, 07:47:48 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • The OP reminds me of a story that an acquaintance once told me about life her growing up on a large farm in Wisconsin in the late 1940's and 1950's. She and her brothers were trained to hunt in their woods by their dad, and she and her brothers were quite proficient at it by the time they were about 10 years old. Two of her brothers were conscripted into the Army during the Vietnam war. She said that her brother's unit (they both served in the same unit) went into a wooded area in which there was a skirmish with the Vietnamese, and that her brothers were the only ones in the unit to survive it. She felt that their training to hunt in the woods helped them to survive in that war.

    However, she wanted nothing to do with farming as an adult, because she was made to work so hard on the farm growing up. But she had a lot of good stories about the farm in which she was raised. I'm not sure that it's a good idea to train girls how to hunt. But apparently, this woman's dad wanted her to know how to do so. 
    "There is no religion higher than my own opinion."

    ~ Traditional Catholics

    Offline Matthew

    • Mod
    • *****
    • Posts: 26924
    • Reputation: +23146/-312
    • Gender: Male
    Re: NORTH DAKOTA FARM KID in the Marines
    « Reply #7 on: June 02, 2021, 08:43:24 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • However, she wanted nothing to do with farming as an adult, because she was made to work so hard on the farm growing up. But she had a lot of good stories about the farm in which she was raised.

    This is always sad to hear, and I'll admit it's a bit disturbing to think about.

    The whole "the grass is greener on the other side" phenomenon. Generation 1 starts out on a farm -- the family works hard, but you have peace and quiet, fresh air, privacy, freedom, independence, plenty of room for storage, play, exploration -- but what's on the other side of the fence? Hmmm... excitement, stuff to do, stuff going on, material things, wealth, comforts, luxuries...

    Kids in generation 2 all move to the city in search of these things. Classic "Grass is Greener on the Other Side" effect. Family farm is sold off.

    Then, generation 2 has kids: generation 3. They are all born into the city. But they are all-too-aware of all the shortcomings of city life: Traffic jams, noise, riots, crowding, pollution, lack of privacy, crime, etc. but what's on the other side of the fence? Hmmm.... peace and quiet, fresh air, privacy, freedom, independence, plenty of room for storage, play, exploration...

    Kids in generation 3 ALL "wish" they could "get a place out in the country someday... grandpa & grandma used to live in the country..." a couple might succeed, but it's hard, expensive...

    Those who don't move into the country have children (generation 4) who also yearn for the advantages of country life -- several of those children move back to the country.

    Then all those kids who move to the country? They become Generation 1.

    Lather, rinse, repeat. Second verse, same as the first.

    Human nature is hopeless.
    Feeling generous? Want to say "thank you"? Feel free to send gift(s) from my Amazon wishlist!
    https://www.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/25M2B8RERL1UO

    Start Amazon.com session by clicking this link, and my family and I get a commission on your purchase!


    Offline Matthew

    • Mod
    • *****
    • Posts: 26924
    • Reputation: +23146/-312
    • Gender: Male
    Re: NORTH DAKOTA FARM KID in the Marines
    « Reply #8 on: June 02, 2021, 08:46:35 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • The thing is, living out closer to nature is objectively better for human beings than city life. 

    In the city, everything declares the glory of man. Look at those immense skyscrapers! Drainage systems which whisk away rainfall out-of-sight within minutes. In the country, man is "put in his place" -- and all declares the glory of God. Every direction you look, the world screams that God alone is in control.

    Which is better for man? The answer is obvious.
    Feeling generous? Want to say "thank you"? Feel free to send gift(s) from my Amazon wishlist!
    https://www.amazon.com/hz/wishlist/ls/25M2B8RERL1UO

    Start Amazon.com session by clicking this link, and my family and I get a commission on your purchase!

    Offline Meg

    • Hero Member
    • *****
    • Posts: 4137
    • Reputation: +2144/-2081
    • Gender: Female
    Re: NORTH DAKOTA FARM KID in the Marines
    « Reply #9 on: June 02, 2021, 09:48:55 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • This is always sad to hear, and I'll admit it's a bit disturbing to think about.

    The whole "the grass is greener on the other side" phenomenon. Generation 1 starts out on a farm -- the family works hard, but you have peace and quiet, fresh air, privacy, freedom, independence, plenty of room for storage, play, exploration -- but what's on the other side of the fence? Hmmm... excitement, stuff to do, stuff going on, material things, wealth, comforts, luxuries...

    Kids in generation 2 all move to the city in search of these things. Classic "Grass is Greener on the Other Side" effect. Family farm is sold off.

    Then, generation 2 has kids: generation 3. They are all born into the city. But they are all-too-aware of all the shortcomings of city life: Traffic jams, noise, riots, crowding, pollution, lack of privacy, crime, etc. but what's on the other side of the fence? Hmmm.... peace and quiet, fresh air, privacy, freedom, independence, plenty of room for storage, play, exploration...

    Kids in generation 3 ALL "wish" they could "get a place out in the country someday... grandpa & grandma used to live in the country..." a couple might succeed, but it's hard, expensive...

    Those who don't move into the country have children (generation 4) who also yearn for the advantages of country life -- several of those children move back to the country.

    Then all those kids who move to the country? They become Generation 1.

    Lather, rinse, repeat. Second verse, same as the first.

    Human nature is hopeless.

    I agree. The grass is often greener on the other side. Or seems to be. The city/country life tends to cyclic, as you describe. That's the case in my family anyway. Human nature seems to be difficult to satisfy.

    My hope is that a few modern comforts can be incorporated into country life, so as to not make it too hard for children to live, even if they work a lot. Hard work is good for children, but too much can lead to resentment. Some sort of balance is needed, maybe. If Sundays are left to be a day of rest and attend Mass if possible, as it's supposed to be, it might help. But since I've not ever lived in the country or on a farm, I've no idea really.
    "There is no religion higher than my own opinion."

    ~ Traditional Catholics

    Offline jvk

    • Jr. Member
    • **
    • Posts: 479
    • Reputation: +410/-13
    • Gender: Female
    Re: NORTH DAKOTA FARM KID in the Marines
    « Reply #10 on: July 10, 2021, 06:12:58 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • We are a "Generation 1", as Matthew might say.

    Our motto is, "work hard, play hard".  Sundays are an absolute STRICT day of rest; we all enjoy our Sundays!  I always worry about the children being resentful of all the hard work involved, but they haven't become so yet.  Our oldest is 14, though, so maybe that will change as he gets older.  I suspect that some of the resentfulness might spring from the mother's attitude.  

    We all work hard as a family, but then we all enjoy the efforts as a family, as well.  Recently the boys and their dad baled extra hay, and he told them if we don't need it this winter they could sell it and use the money for something they'd enjoy for use on our place (traps, guns, a 4-wheeler, etc).  


     

    Sitemap 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16