Author Topic: ELEISON COMMENTS CCCLXII - June 21st, 2014  (Read 2026 times)

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Offline Neil Obstat

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ELEISON COMMENTS CCCLXII - June 21st, 2014
« on: June 21, 2014, 10:48:14 AM »
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    Number CCCLXII (362)                                     21st June 2014


    DIC-KENS' BROADSTAIRS

             A number of friends have asked me how I like the house newly purchased for the “Resistance” in Kent, England. I like it. It is spacious and it is being beautifully set up by a fellow-exile from the Society of St Pius X, Fr Stephen Abraham. Only Heaven knows how it intends the house to be used in the near and distant future, but it is meanwhile a delightful refuge, five minutes on foot from the sea which God created, and which the liberals cannot touch.

              Several famous English artists and writers from the past have also found refuge in this delightful corner of north-east Kent. Most famous of the artists is J.M.W. TURNER (1775-1751). Born in London where he spent most of his working life, from age 11 he spent several formative years in Margate, some four miles up the coast from Broadstairs. Here he discovered the sea, which with its light effects was a lifelong inspiration for his painting, and to Margate he frequently returned later in life.

              Also in Margate the most famous poet in English of the 20th century, T.S. ELIOT (1888-1965), composed in an open-air pavilion still standing on Margate's beach, a substantial section of the third part of his most famous poem, The Wasteland (1922). He had come to the seaside town as a refugee from London where an unhappy marriage had seriously affected his health. He did not stay long, but went on to Lausanne, Switzerland, where thanks to the care of a good doctor he completed his recovery and The Wasteland. But the prospect of the sea at Margate had no doubt helped.

              Another famous poet, at least in England, was a frequent visitor to Ramsgate, two miles down the coast from Broadstairs. Samuel Taylor COLERIDGE, one of England's five outstanding Romantic poets, is best-known for his long poem, The Ancient Mariner. He loved bathing in the sea at Ramsgate, perhaps also for health reasons. In any case, the colder the sea, the more he liked it.

              Most famous of all, however, was a frequent visitor to Broadstairs itself, the novelist Charles D!ckens (1812-1870). He first resorted to Broadstairs in 1837, as a quiet place in which to complete his first novel, The Pickwick Papers, but he so fell in love with the antiquated little seaside town that he often returned with his family to write, or to rest from writing, through the 1840's and into the 1850's. His name and names of his novels, or of characters from his novels, are to be found all over the old town that he knew. It is now surrounded, not to say strangled, by Victorian and modern suburbs, but Broadstairs still celebrates every year its most famous visitor with a Dic`kens Festival in June.

              Dr. David Allen White, a Catholic teacher of literature and music who is well-known to many Catholics striving to keep the Faith all over the English-speaking world, is a great lover of Dickens. Since he is passing through London this summer, he agreed to visit Broadstairs in order to hold on August 2 and 3 a 24-hour weekend seminar on Di~ckens, open to the public and including three conferences and Sunday Mass, and a visit which he will guide to the Dic.kens Museum in town, set up in a little old house known to, and visited by, Di/ckens himself. If you are interested in attending, let us know soon (through info@dinoscopus.org), because if numbers have to be limited, first come will be first served. Meals will be provided in-house, but visitors will have to find their own accommodation outside. Beware, it will be the height of the holiday season.

              Di*ckens was not Catholic, but Dostoevsky called him “a great Christian”. D-ickens certainly had a warm and open heart, and a brilliant pen.

              Kyrie eleison.


    For Dickens, Broadstairs was a great delight.
    To find out why, come listen to Dr White.

       



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    Offline Neil Obstat

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    ELEISON COMMENTS CCCLXII - June 21st, 2014
    « Reply #1 on: June 21, 2014, 10:55:12 AM »
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    If you were thinking about taking me up on a bet that +W wouldn't mention Garabandal this week, you muffed it.


    Hey, maybe next week!  In any event, a respite in poetic English gardens isn't a bad idea from time to time.   It sounds like +W might have the chance for some peace of mind after all, that is, at least for a time........................



    Meanwhile, anyone for a nice cognac, fine cigar, and a game
    Of chess amongst the night blooming jasmine with some D!ckens at hand ?   :wink:

    (If I can't rhyme worth beans at least I can count them.)


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    Offline holysoulsacademy

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    ELEISON COMMENTS CCCLXII - June 21st, 2014
    « Reply #2 on: June 21, 2014, 11:01:06 AM »
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  • Chaucer and jasmine will be just fine but shall trade the cognac for wine.

    Offline Neil Obstat

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    ELEISON COMMENTS CCCLXII - June 21st, 2014
    « Reply #3 on: June 21, 2014, 11:03:54 AM »
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  • Quote from: holysoulsacademy

    Chaucer and jasmine will be just fine,
    But shall trade the cognac for wine.



    You spoke too soon, since I traded Chaucer for D!ckens.   HAHAHAHA

    So, I take it you too would enjoy chess in such a setting?!  





    (Why the D!ckens anyone would trade fine cognac for wine ... )

    .
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    Offline Neil Obstat

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    ELEISON COMMENTS CCCLXII - June 21st, 2014
    « Reply #4 on: June 21, 2014, 11:22:19 AM »
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  • .

    Speaking of cigars, I've run into a certain movement afoot.  It seems that the cigar brand H. Upmann is widely regarded as an icon of long-established cigar craftsmanship which has for over a century been something that counted for something.  Since 1844, they've put out a CONSISTENT product, and one that has repeatedly met with approval from aficionados.  But in recent years, a kind of revolution has been going on, not limited to the cigar industry, but rather spilling over to other aspects of culture in the main.  There is a new trend to set aside longstanding icons in search for something new.  But this touches the cigar world by way of a few upstarts having drawn a significant market share away from the old warhorses.  At first it was considered to be a lark, but the same trend has been going on year after year, now, for about 5-10 of them.  The stodgy old wisdom seems to be starting to crack.  There is a new bar in town that goes by the logo, "Not your old man's bar."  And this is surprising because word on the street was that the local sheriff was quite opposed to the idea of providing wild youths (implication of drugs, crime and rowdiness) with a place to gather, but they managed to get their liquor license no problem.

    Sorry if this is off-topic.  But the EC brought it to mind, somehow.


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    Offline Frances

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    ELEISON COMMENTS CCCLXII - June 21st, 2014
    « Reply #5 on: June 21, 2014, 01:09:32 PM »
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  •  :dancing-banana:
    Sorry, holysouls, but I think the Bishop's residence is for men only.  I prefer Chaucer to
    D i c k e n s, and very much enjoy Coleridge and chess.  (Although I'm really bad at it!)  I prefer wine to cognac.  The garden definitely needs a woman's touch before it is pleasant.  The men can build a deck or patio and plant lilac bushes and shrubbery along the fence line.  We women can plant beautiful flowers and maybe a small vegetable garden.  Bp. W. should acquire and bless a tasteful statue of Our Lady as the centerpeice.  A birdbath and hummingbird feeders will add to the old English atmosphere.  He should adopt a British shorthair cat to control rodents and purr in front of the fireplace and at His Excellency's feet.  (I say his feet, not his lap, as cat hair does not become a cassock.)  
    Seriously, I believe Bishop Williamson likes his new home and is thankful to Our Lord for allowing him to have it.  
    I don't understand those who condemn him for buying it.  Must a priest be homeless or live in a shack order to be holy?  Not everyone can live like Fr. Pfeiffer.  In fact, most cannot!
     St. Francis Xavier threw a Crucifix into the sea, at once calming the waves.  Upon reaching the shore, the Crucifix was returned to him by a crab with a curious cross pattern on its shell.  

    Offline Marlelar

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    ELEISON COMMENTS CCCLXII - June 21st, 2014
    « Reply #6 on: June 21, 2014, 07:05:18 PM »
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  • Quote from: Frances
      Seriously, I believe Bishop Williamson likes his new home and is thankful to Our Lord for allowing him to have it.  
    I don't understand those who condemn him for buying it.  Must a priest be homeless or live in a shack order to be holy?  


    Are there photos of his new residence?

    Marsha

    Offline Wessex

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    ELEISON COMMENTS CCCLXII - June 21st, 2014
    « Reply #7 on: June 25, 2014, 07:07:21 AM »
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  • No doubt a far better place than the cowardly Wimbledon abode. One hates to think of all the resources sunk into the Society's UK presence only to find out later that it is manned by mediocre opportunists. Did Dickens foresee such a situation in his novels? His time was mid-19th century, when there were great changes for English Catholics and some in the established church were wanting more cultural colour in their depressing religious life. It is interesting to note the bishop is borrowing a lot from non-Catholic sources to show up the evident shortcoming in the so-called Catholic world.


    Offline Wessex

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    ELEISON COMMENTS CCCLXII - June 21st, 2014
    « Reply #8 on: June 26, 2014, 05:33:52 AM »
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  • It is hard to know whom these media whores like Searchlight represent these days. They easily sell their favours far and wide and their funding often comes via PR firms quietly employed by mainstream institutions intent on maintaining their grip on the world they have created and their target is anyone and anything that looks like upsetting that hold.

    The current SSPX may or may not welcome the attention of so-called researchers with 'juicy' bits of information to spring onto those who have heard it all before but joining the mainstream should give it some relief from such attacks. Meanwhile the bishop will continue to carry that part of ABL's legacy that so infuruated the reformers and the poltical establishment. His voice now needs to be louder otherwise others will fill the vacuum.  

     

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