Author Topic: Historiography of the Right  (Read 508 times)

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Offline Graham

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Historiography of the Right
« on: November 21, 2012, 01:00:15 PM »
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  • Some counter-revolutionary circles have spoken recently of the need for a concerted historiography of the right, around which resistance to the modern world could crystallize, just as liberals have rallied around the principle of progress. I'd like to briefly point out something I've noticed, during my time in the Church, that supports this contention.

    It's critical to get the two Great Wars and the surrounding events straight, because they are pivotal to the identity and worldview of the modern west. I think one could draw a pretty straight dividing line between those traditional Catholics who accept the mainstream narrative, and those who don't. In a fairly consistent way, the two groups seem to espouse competing values, often while using the same terminology and referring to the same authoritative sources. It does not seem possible to resolve this sort of controversy on the level at which it is currently engaged, since the disagreement clearly arises in the emotional layer as a result of identities rooted in different soils.

    So I find it true that one cannot accept a liberal historiography without letting liberal emotional structures in through the back. And I'm convinced that the lack of a coherent alternative historiography results in many otherwise good Catholics dallying with the modern world. The Right needs more comprehensive fortifications if it hopes to hold out.



    Offline Telesphorus

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    Historiography of the Right
    « Reply #1 on: November 21, 2012, 03:32:29 PM »
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  • In reality of course there are plenty of middle views that many people have held to.  Certainly the people at the time had all sorts of views on what was happening - and that would include the leaders of the Catholic Church.  For the most part, the views they had back then of what was going on would not be considered  acceptable today.

    In practice, there are those who subject the historical narrative to a combination of what Richard F Burton calls  "the so-called liberal school." - with some exceptions thrown in for particular cases like Franco - sometimes.

    As for settling history definitively - that won't happen.

    What Catholics do need to understand and accept - is that people fundamentally opposed to Catholicism are in control of the popular narrative of history.


    Offline Telesphorus

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    Historiography of the Right
    « Reply #2 on: November 21, 2012, 03:46:16 PM »
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  • correction:

    In practice, there are those who subject the historical narrative to what Richard F Burton calls  "the vapid utterance of the so-called liberal school." - with some exceptions thrown in for particular cases like Franco - sometimes - and their views are ultimately incompatible with a Catholic view of history - and they are extremely intolerant.

     

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