Author Topic: Snake cooking  (Read 2036 times)

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Offline Nadir

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Re: Snake cooking
« Reply #15 on: July 08, 2017, 05:22:14 AM »
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  • What a great combination in you and your husband, jvk - an adventurous eater and and adventurous cook!

    Offline Student of Qi

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    Re: Snake cooking
    « Reply #16 on: July 08, 2017, 09:33:44 PM »
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  •  I'm curious how you did fix it, by the way.  :confused:
    Unfortunately, the main ingredient has been missing for a while now... Here are all these interesting ideas and just as one hopes to try 'em the snakes stop coming around! Hopfully, the next time one comes around it shall be a big one so that it can be divided in three sections and cooked three different ways. It can't take more then a month for them to come around, considering their eating habits. Maybe a few eggs can also be set out as a lure... but I may end up with a variety of beasts other than serpents...

    I'll make another post when it's been attempted and let you know how it goes. 

    Thank you, everyone!
    Many people say "For the Honor and Glory of God!" but, what they should say is "For the Love, Glory and Honor of God". - Fr. Paul of Moll


    Offline Student of Qi

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    Re: Snake cooking
    « Reply #17 on: September 01, 2017, 11:11:21 PM »
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  • Well, it's been over a month but a snake has finally been put to the pan yesterday, and it was marvelous! I've rarely enjoyed my cooking as much as I did with this expirament.

    I cleaved the snake into small thumb length pieces and separated the amount into three portions. One portion went into home brewed wine, the third into lemon juice with one lime added to it, and the third was put into a salt brine. It marinated for 24 hours before cooking. Most of each batch was battered, fried in vegetable oil, and patted dry after every piece was pulled from the cast-iron skillet.

    I used my older sister's recipe for battered okra, so I can't tell you how to make it... sorry. But, as for the wine, it's vintage of 2012, it's  a sparkling, red, dry wine brewed from wild Mustang grapes. I thought the batch marinated in wine was maybe a little better without the batter.
       The batch that was marinated in lemon and lime juice was also very good, and went well with the batter. However, I am one of those people who enjoy sour food and can eat lemons plain. Be advised that soaking the snake in strait lemon juice for 24 hours will certainly tenderize the meat, but may cause it to be too strong for most people to eat. That said, I loved it!
       Lastly, the batch that was brined was also good, but it may have needed more soaking in clean water, as my little sister said it was too salty...

    Once again, thank you all for your suggestions! I can't let the big ones go anymore after this!

    In the pictures, you can see how pale the flesh originally was, and in one of them how the wine permeated it and changed the pigments.

    Many people say "For the Honor and Glory of God!" but, what they should say is "For the Love, Glory and Honor of God". - Fr. Paul of Moll

    Offline DZ PLEASE

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    • "Lord, have mercy."
    Re: Snake cooking
    « Reply #18 on: September 01, 2017, 11:41:05 PM »
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  • Well, it's been over a month but a snake has finally been put to the pan yesterday, and it was marvelous! I've rarely enjoyed my cooking as much as I did with this expirament.

    I cleaved the snake into small thumb length pieces and separated the amount into three portions. One portion went into home brewed wine, the third into lemon juice with one lime added to it, and the third was put into a salt brine. It marinated for 24 hours before cooking. Most of each batch was battered, fried in vegetable oil, and patted dry after every piece was pulled from the cast-iron skillet.

    I used my older sister's recipe for battered okra, so I can't tell you how to make it... sorry. But, as for the wine, it's vintage of 2012, it's  a sparkling, red, dry wine brewed from wild Mustang grapes. I thought the batch marinated in wine was maybe a little better without the batter.
       The batch that was marinated in lemon and lime juice was also very good, and went well with the batter. However, I am one of those people who enjoy sour food and can eat lemons plain. Be advised that soaking the snake in strait lemon juice for 24 hours will certainly tenderize the meat, but may cause it to be too strong for most people to eat. That said, I loved it!
       Lastly, the batch that was brined was also good, but it may have needed more soaking in clean water, as my little sister said it was too salty...

    Once again, thank you all for your suggestions! I can't let the big ones go anymore after this!

    In the pictures, you can see how pale the flesh originally was, and in one of them how the wine permeated it and changed the pigments.
    Diamondback tempura... good eating.
    "Lord, have mercy".

     

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