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Author Topic: Simple Steps to Eating Clean  (Read 744 times)

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Offline Cantarella

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Simple Steps to Eating Clean
« on: June 27, 2014, 10:16:50 PM »
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  • 1. Eliminate Pre-Packaged Foods

    2. Increase Your Vegetable Intake

    3. Go Organic, Grass-Fed, Pasture Raised & GMO-Free

    4. Replace Saturated Fats with Beneficial Fats

    5. Incorporate Juicing & Green Smoothies

    6. Increase Your Fruit Intake

    7. Decrease Your Meat Consumption

    8. Buy Foods With a Short Ingredient List

    9. Reduce Salt & Sugar

    10. Increase Your Water Consumption

    11. Eliminating Bad Beverages



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    http://theclassywoman.blogspot.com/2014/06/living-well-my-guide-to-clean-eating.html#.U64x2F7n92s
    If anyone says that true and natural water is not necessary for baptism and thus twists into some metaphor the words of our Lord Jesus Christ" Unless a man be born again of water and the Holy Spirit" (Jn 3:5) let him be anathema.

    Offline PG

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    Simple Steps to Eating Clean
    « Reply #1 on: June 28, 2014, 01:45:09 AM »
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  • 1 - agree
    2 - agree
    3 - agree
    4 - agree
    5 - disagree - avoid non traditional methods of preparing food(electric blender/juicer).
    6 - agree
    7 -
    8 - This is a favorite penance of mine.  
    9 - I like and use a lot of pink sea salt.  I recommend it.  
    10 - agree
    11 - I like vinegar(there are all kinds to choose from) mixed with water and honey or agave(sugar probably works too).  It tastes just like a soda type drink when you get the portions correct(and it doesn't go bad).  
    "A secure mind is like a continual feast" - Proverbs xv: 15


    Offline ggreg

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    Simple Steps to Eating Clean
    « Reply #2 on: June 28, 2014, 02:09:54 AM »
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  • Everything in moderation.

    Learn to say no to that extra large bag of chips, super sized meal.  Drink water instead of pop, most of the time when offered pop.

    Cut your meals to 3/4 or half portions.  Sure, you will feel hungry but you can get used to that pretty fast.  If dopey fashion models have the will power to stave themselves, (how do you think they look so thin), then you can too.

    I became a county champion athlete on normal food including processed food and my children are national standard junior athletes despite the fact that we have never eaten anything organic in our lives and they probably have a Mc Donald's six to ten times a year.

    If a normal sensible diet with any any all of the above vegetables laden with pesticides was bad for you then why would the children eating super healthy organic food grown in clean Swiss mountain pastures not be able to beat my kids consistently in athletic competitions?

    Offline ggreg

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    Simple Steps to Eating Clean
    « Reply #3 on: June 28, 2014, 02:28:47 AM »
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  • Organic foods are certainly not more nutritious [12]. The nutrient content of plants is determined primarily by heredity. Mineral content may be affected by the mineral content of the soil, but this has no significance in the overall diet. If essential nutrients are missing from the soil, the plant will not grow. If plants grow, that means the essential nutrients are present. Experiments conducted for many years have found no difference in the nutrient content of organically grown crops and those grown under standard agricultural conditions.

    Safer?

    Many "organic" proponents suggest that their foods are safer because they have lower levels of pesticide residues. However, the pesticide levels in our food supply are not high. In some situations, pesticides even reduce health risks by preventing the growth of harmful organisms, including molds that produce toxic substances.

    To protect consumers, the FDA sets tolerance levels in foods and conducts frequent "market basket" studies wherein foods from regions throughout the United States are purchased and analyzed. Its 1997 tests found that about 60% of fruits and vegetables had no detectable pesticides and only about 1.2% of domestic and 1.6% of imported foods had violative levels.  Its annual Total Diet Study has always found that America's dietary intakes are well within international and Environmental Protection Agency standards.

    Most studies conducted since the early 1970s have found that the pesticide levels in foods designated organic were similar to those that were not. In 1997, Consumer Reports purchased about a thousand pounds of tomatoes, peaches, green bell peppers, and apples in five cities and tested them for more than 300 synthetic pesticides. Traces were detected in 77% of conventional foods and 25% of organically labeled foods, but only one sample of each exceeded the federal limit.

    Offline Judas Machabeus

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    Simple Steps to Eating Clean
    « Reply #4 on: June 28, 2014, 06:57:22 AM »
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  • Quote from: Cantarella
    1. Eliminate Pre-Packaged Foods

    2. Increase Your Vegetable Intake

    3. Go Organic, Grass-Fed, Pasture Raised & GMO-Free

    4. Replace Saturated Fats with Beneficial Fats


    Yes.

    Quote
    5. Incorporate Juicing & Green Smoothies

    6. Increase Your Fruit Intake


    I disagree.  It is not beneficial, in my opinion, because of the high glycemic index in juices.  One also loses the benefits of fiber and phytochemicals in the whole fruit or vegetable.  It also increases caloric intake unnecessarily.  I really don't understand the juicing trend.

    Fruit should ordinarily be limited to one or two servings a day.

    Quote
    7. Decrease Your Meat Consumption


    Again, I disagree.  The healthiest diet for most people is the Paleo diet, which requires ample animal protein.  I find that I need to eat meat at least several times a day to feel satisfied.  If one does not feel satisfied, he will consume extra calories of substitute foods, like carbs, in a futile effort to feed the real hunger, which is for meat.

    Quote
    8. Buy Foods With a Short Ingredient List


    That necessarily follows from choosing unprocessed foods.

    Quote
    9. Reduce Salt & Sugar

    10. Increase Your Water Consumption

    11. Eliminating Bad Beverages


    Yes.  

    I lost 140 pounds between Holy Week 2013 (late March) and February 2014.  I went from 330 pounds to about 190.  I have maintained my weight since then.  I followed an approach called intuitive eating; there is an excellent, cheap book with that title that I highly recommend.  In addition that, I chose mostly whole, unprocessed foods, and I ate in the direction of Paleo without becoming a fanatic about it.

    As Greg says, moderation is important.  What matters most is how you eat over time, not just one meal or even one day of eating.  It's best to retain some flexibility.  Otherwise, strictness in this matter can backfire by causing one to think he's "blown it," which leads to binge eating or, prior to starting again, last supper eating.

    Beware of developing orthorexia.  (Google it.)


     

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