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Offline RomanCatholic1953

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State-By-State Breakdown Of 897 US Hospitals At Risk Of Closing
« on: January 28, 2021, 05:07:45 PM »
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  • State-By-State Breakdown Of 897 US Hospitals At Risk Of Closing
    January 28, 2021 in News by RBN Staff



    Source: Zero Hedge

     


    By Alya Elison of Becker Hospital Review
    More than 500 rural hospitals in the U.S. were at immєdιαte risk of closure before the CÖVÌD-19 pandemic because of financial losses and lack of reserves to maintain operations, according to a report from the Center for Healthcare Quality and Payment Reform.
    Nearly every state had at least one rural hospital at immєdιαte risk of closure before the pandemic. In 22 states, 25 percent or more of rural hospitals were at immєdιαte risk, according to the report.
    The hospitals identified as being at immєdιαte risk of closure had a cuмulative negative total margin over the most recent three-year period, and their financial situation has likely deteriorated because of the pandemic.
    Across the U.S., more than 800 hospitals – 40 percent of all rural hospitals in the country – are either at immєdιαte or high risk of closure. The more than 300 hospitals at high risk closure either have low financial reserves or high dependence on nonpatient service revenues such as local taxes or state subsidies, according to the report.
    Here are the number and percentage of rural hospitals at risk of closing in each state as of January 2021 based on the CHQPR analysis:
    Alabama
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 30 (63 percent)
    Alaska
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 5 (38 percent)
    Arizona
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 4 (22 percent)
    Arkansas
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 29 (60 percent)
    California
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 16 (31 percent)
    Colorado
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 11 (27 percent)
    Connecticut
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 3 (100 percent)
    Delaware
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 0 (0 percent)
    Florida
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 7 (35 percent)
    Georgia
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 26 (43 percent)
    Hawaii
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 8 (67 percent)
    Idaho
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 7 (25 percent)
    Illinois
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 20 (27 percent)
    Indiana
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 20 (38 percent)
    Iowa
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 40 (44 percent)
    Kansas
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 76 (72 percent)
    Kentucky
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 16 (23 percent)
    Louisiana
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 26 (53 percent)
    Maine
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 10 (40 percent)
    Maryland
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 1 (25 percent)
    Massachusetts
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 2 (40 percent)
    Michigan
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 19 (30 percent)
    Minnesota
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 28 (31 percent)
    Mississippi
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 41 (62 percent)
    Missouri
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 31 (54 percent)
    Montana
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 19 (37 percent)
    Nebraska
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 24 (33 percent)
    Nevada
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 6 (46 percent)
    New Hampshire
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 4 (24 percent)
    New Jersey
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 0 (0 percent)
    New Mexico
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 6 (25 percent)
    New York
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 30 (59 percent)
    North Carolina
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 19 (36 percent)
    North Dakota
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 16 (43 percent)
    Ohio
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 19 (27 percent)
    Oklahoma
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 41 (56 percent)
    Oregon
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 11 (34 percent)
    Pennsylvania
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 18 (42 percent)
    Rhode Island
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 0 (0 percent)
    South Carolina
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 12 (48 percent)
    South Dakota
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 11 (24 percent)
    Tennessee
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 30 (59 percent)
    Texas
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 82 (56 percent)
    Utah
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 3 (14 percent)
    Vermont
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 2 (15 percent)
    Virginia
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 14 (50 percent)
    Washington
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 20 (50 percent)
    West Virginia
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 11 (46 percent)
    Wisconsin
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 16 (22 percent)
    Wyoming
    Rural hospitals at high risk of closing: 7 (30 percent)


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    Offline Seraphina

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    Re: State-By-State Breakdown Of 897 US Hospitals At Risk Of Closing
    « Reply #1 on: January 29, 2021, 02:30:27 AM »
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  • Sad, isn’t it?  If you have a medical emergency and live n a rural area, it’s just too bad.  The place where I lived in the 1980s used to have three small hospitals, 15, 20, and maybe 25 miles away.  They’ve all three closed.  Now, the nearest is at a big university hospital about 85 miles away.  They also used to have rural clinics with a P.A., RN on duty.  They charged on a sliding scale and didn’t take insurance.  For many people, it was $5.00 a visit or even free.  Because of some law, they all closed in the mid 1990s.  Most small towns are entirely without doctors of any sort.  You have to go the 85 miles to the hospital corporation medical centers.  Maybe it’s time for an underground medical system that treats with natural medicines and treatments.  Most doctors these days are wage slaves to medical corporations.  Unless one is quite well to do, you can’t run your own medical practice.  Doctors have no control over their office staff, their assistants, even what treatments and tests they run, all dictated by crazy laws.  Now, under Biden, Catholics doctors will end up having to leave if abortion becomes codified as he says.  I guess one can always switch to something like podiatry, or veterinarian!  Anyone want to be a tree doctor?  


    Offline Matthew

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    Re: State-By-State Breakdown Of 897 US Hospitals At Risk Of Closing
    « Reply #2 on: January 29, 2021, 07:14:20 AM »
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  • I'm not surprised.

    They have cancelled countless "elective" surguries, and who knows how many people will die this year due to the COVID lockdowns.

    How many people are postponing their doctor visits, cancer treatments, cardiovascular health checkups, various screenings, etc.?

    How many will die as a result?
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    Offline SeanJohnson

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    Re: State-By-State Breakdown Of 897 US Hospitals At Risk Of Closing
    « Reply #3 on: January 29, 2021, 07:34:04 AM »
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  • I’m sure the thought of fɾαυdulent CÖVÌD19 cause of death diagnoses ($13k bonus/ea), or placing patients on ventilators ($39k bonus/ea) as a partial cure for financial woes would never tempt such honorable and ethical humanitarians as our “front line” medical professionals.

     ;)

    On the other hand, if a business can’t remain solvent despite charging such exorbitant rates, it is a sign that it is riddled with corruption, negligence, and/or incompetence (regardless of whatever additional financial burdens various taxing and regulatory issues add to cost).

    60 years ago, doctors made house calls, and you could afford to pay them cash without needing insurance to help cover it.

    But that was before the medical profession accepted the bribes of the Pharma sorcerers.

    Today, a large portion of doctors are de facto sales agents of big pharma, and sit quietly in the face of the COVID19 fraud, going along to get along (kind of like SSPX priests in the face of all the changes in the Society).

    I have no respect anymore for the medical profession, and lump them in with banksters, lawyers, and politicians.

    Romans 5:20 "But where sin increased, grace abounded all the more."

    -I retract any and all statements I have made that are incongruent with the True Faith, and apologize for ever having made them-

    Offline Seraphina

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    Re: State-By-State Breakdown Of 897 US Hospitals At Risk Of Closing
    « Reply #4 on: January 29, 2021, 09:03:12 AM »
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  • I have no respect anymore for the medical profession, and lump them in with banksters, lawyers, and politicians.

    I agree with a few individual exceptions.  When Commicare came in 2014, lots of good doctors went out.  Many older doctors retired rather than hand over their private practices to corporate (govt./big pharma) medicine.  These days, doctors, like public school teachers, are not treated like professionals. They go to school and get hundred scoff thousands of dollars in debt only to be dictated to by preprogrammed computers how to practice medicine.  Follow the protocol or else...
    I do respect the many, many who retired or switched careers rather than comply.  Everyone in my family lost their long-time doctor to retirement, and, in one case, a career switch to veterinary college.  My sister’s pediatrician now makes barn calls in rural Indiana ministering to four-legged patients.


    Online Miser Peccator

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    Re: State-By-State Breakdown Of 897 US Hospitals At Risk Of Closing
    « Reply #5 on: January 31, 2021, 06:15:11 PM »
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  • The globalists have made it clear that the future of medicine is not in catastrophic treatment.

    They have shown over and over in their Ted talks and Davos meetings and WEF meetings and Singularity University videos etc. that the future of medicine is nanotech.

    The nanobots in our bodies will continually read bio sensors and send information to our doctors  (most likely AI and not human).

    The AI will determine what we need to optimize our health.

    We will have countertop 3D printers which will print drugs and the mRNA operating device which is what the Moderna shot is actually setting up, will deliver the drugs.  According to their website, it's a plug and play system.

    All the "humans" (turned cyborgs) will be interconnected so data can be shared for further optimization.

    We won't be needing hospitals.

    They want optimized slaves.

    Online Miser Peccator

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    Re: State-By-State Breakdown Of 897 US Hospitals At Risk Of Closing
    « Reply #6 on: January 31, 2021, 06:17:07 PM »
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  • Also, this guy has been riding his ebike around NY since last spring showing the hospitals are not busy at all:

    https://www.youtube.com/user/lincolnkarim1

    Online Miser Peccator

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    Re: State-By-State Breakdown Of 897 US Hospitals At Risk Of Closing
    « Reply #7 on: January 31, 2021, 06:57:26 PM »
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  • The ɠƖobaƖısts have made it clear that the future of medicine is not in catastrophic treatment.

    They have shown over and over in their Ted talks and Davos meetings and WEF meetings and Singularity University videos etc. that the future of medicine is nanotech.

    The nanobots in our bodies will continually read bio sensors and send information to our doctors  (most likely AI and not human).

    The AI will determine what we need to optimize our health.

    We will have countertop 3D printers which will print drugs and the mRNA operating device which is what the Moderna shot is actually setting up, will deliver the drugs.  According to their website, it's a plug and play system.

    All the "humans" (turned cyborgs) will be interconnected so data can be shared for further optimization.

    We won't be needing hospitals.

    They want optimized slaves.
    Oh and the drugs won't be your run of the mill drugs, but actually CRISPR type gene editing.
    The nanobots will also perform surgeries.


     

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