Author Topic: Questions on gluttony  (Read 1075 times)

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Offline curiouscatholic23

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Questions on gluttony
« on: November 28, 2011, 11:54:58 PM »
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  • 1.) Did most of the american public who stuffed themselves full of thanksgiving turkey, ham, and mashed potatoes objectively commmit mortal sins?

    2.) Is it a mortal sin of gluttony to eat two really full plates of dinner and be very full afterwards for hours?

    3.) Is it a mortal sin of gluttony to purposely stuff oneself during dinner because one did not have enough calories during lunch or dinner?

    Offline Telesphorus

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    Questions on gluttony
    « Reply #1 on: November 29, 2011, 12:02:10 AM »
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  • Quote from: curiouscatholic23
    1.) Did most of the american public who stuffed themselves full of thanksgiving turkey, ham, and mashed potatoes objectively commmit mortal sins?

    2.) Is it a mortal sin of gluttony to eat two really full plates of dinner and be very full afterwards for hours?

    3.) Is it a mortal sin of gluttony to purposely stuff oneself during dinner because one did not have enough calories during lunch or dinner?


    Father Alphonsus the redemptorist who gives missions for the SSPX told us that gluttony is almost always a venial sin.

    Maybe something like bulimia, the old roman feasts, would be mortal sins.

    We still need to avoid venial sins.  I've been gluttonous throughout much of my life, and I think the solution is to cut down one's eating so that it's under one's control.  An occasional feast is fine, so long as one doesn't gobble one's food like an animal, eat hugely excessive meals, many pieces of pie, oversized steaks, more than one large hamburger, a whole large pizza, that sort of thing.

    Part of the problem with recognizing the evil of gluttony today is that food is plentiful, so the harm we do is mainly self-inflicted harm.  It's not like olden times when rich fat people ate enormous meals while peasants ate porridge, peas and black bread and counted themselves lucky if they could eat enough to not be starving.


    Offline Telesphorus

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    Questions on gluttony
    « Reply #2 on: November 29, 2011, 12:06:46 AM »
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  • Imagine a sumptuous repast in Orleanist France, hosted by a Rothschild attended by British nobility and members of the commons and doubtless many nominal Catholics, while in Ireland the potatoes were spoiled by blight.

    Offline curiouscatholic23

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    Questions on gluttony
    « Reply #3 on: November 29, 2011, 12:33:47 AM »
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  • Quote from: Telesphorus
    Imagine a sumptuous repast in Orleanist France, hosted by a Rothschild attended by British nobility and members of the commons and doubtless many nominal Catholics, while in Ireland the potatoes were spoiled by blight.


    That added nothing to my questions. No offense.

    Offline Telesphorus

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    Questions on gluttony
    « Reply #4 on: November 29, 2011, 12:36:37 AM »
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  • Quote from: curiouscatholic23
    Quote from: Telesphorus
    Imagine a sumptuous repast in Orleanist France, hosted by a Rothschild attended by British nobility and members of the commons and doubtless many nominal Catholics, while in Ireland the potatoes were spoiled by blight.


    That added nothing to my questions. No offense.


    I would say, no doubt some people were gluttonous, but other people simply ate a hearty feast and enjoyed it, and there was nothing wrong with doing so.

    I'm simply pointing out why today people don't think about gluttony in the same way - it's that hunger is not something they deal with.


    Offline Telesphorus

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    Questions on gluttony
    « Reply #5 on: November 29, 2011, 12:50:57 AM »
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  • If you talk to a priest I'm 90% sure they're going to tell you none of those things are mortal sins.

    If you're worried about gluttony, just try to eat in a more controlled and rational manner, and don't worry about mortal sin.

    And fasting is one of the best ways to strengthen the will, provided it's done in a rational manner, not a neurotic manner.


     

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