Author Topic: Persian cuisine  (Read 2212 times)

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Offline spouse of Jesus

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Persian cuisine
« on: July 17, 2012, 01:31:24 AM »
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  •   One member PMed me and told me to share Persian cuisine recipes. I can't translate the names of all that ingredients to so I have to provide links in English.
      One important points about these food is that they take longer to prepare but you have less to do compared to Italian and French foods. The other thing is that we do it all by ourselves, from washing the vegetables and cutting the meat to pieces to dressing. The practice of buying some ready to cook food and putting it 10 minutes in microwave is not yet widely accepted in Iran.

     http://www.persia.org/Recipes/recipes.html

    Never forget dough!

    http://mypersiankitchen.com/doogh/  :ready-to-eat:

    Offline theology101

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    Persian cuisine
    « Reply #1 on: July 17, 2012, 02:29:56 AM »
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  • I would like to make the adass polo and khoresht bamieh. I absolutely love lentils, rice and okra. I tend to eat a lot of veggies so I like the fact that there are many vegetable dishes. Thanks for these!


    Offline spouse of Jesus

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    Persian cuisine
    « Reply #2 on: July 17, 2012, 02:45:47 AM »
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  •   But when you cook polo don't forget that Persian rice is different from Indian rice. the latter is much larger and needs a shorter time to cook.

    Offline theology101

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    Persian cuisine
    « Reply #3 on: July 17, 2012, 03:27:36 PM »
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  • Quote from: spouse of Jesus
     But when you cook polo don't forget that Persian rice is different from Indian rice. the latter is much larger and needs a shorter time to cook.


    Oh thanks I didnt know that. Two of my teachers are from Iran so I will share and see if they think I made it correctly.

    Offline Tiffany

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    Persian cuisine
    « Reply #4 on: July 18, 2012, 10:31:33 AM »
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  • Sam's Club sells the big bag of Bastmati Rice.

    You want to soak it before to get some of the starch out.

    Boil it and then drain the water.

    Met butter or put oil the bottom of the pot.

    Pour the boil/drained rice on there.

    Get a knife and make about three holes in the rice.

    Find a small towel put it on the under side of the lid, then place it over the pot. This is to absorb some of the water.

    Turn up the heat briefly and then let it steam on low.

    It takes lots of practice but once you get it, it's like second nature.

    Also you can slice thin potatoe slices and soak them, then put them on the bottom of the pot after you melt the butter but before you add the boiled/drain rice.

    If you like saffron you can mix some with a part of rice  - it looks very pretty on the top but I don't like it.

    The crispy part at the bottom is called tah-deek I think.


    Offline Tiffany

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    « Reply #5 on: July 18, 2012, 10:38:03 AM »
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  • Quote from: theology101
    I would like to make the adass polo and khoresht bamieh. I absolutely love lentils, rice and okra. I tend to eat a lot of veggies so I like the fact that there are many vegetable dishes. Thanks for these!


    Adas polo can be pretty simple too. It's a great way to use left overs from a chicken or to stretch ground beef.

    Cook the meat/prepare it in small pieces.
    Boil the lentils until they are ready.

    If you follow the rice instructions above you want to add the meat and lentils to the rice after you boil/drain the rice. Then you steam it all together.

    Offline Tiffany

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    « Reply #6 on: July 18, 2012, 10:40:21 AM »
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  • Quote from: Tiffany
    Sam's Club sells the big bag of Bastmati Rice.

    You want to soak it before to get some of the starch out.

    Boil it and then drain the water.

    Met butter or put oil the bottom of the pot.

    Pour the boil/drained rice on there.

    Get a knife and make about three holes in the rice.

    Find a small towel put it on the under side of the lid, then place it over the pot. This is to absorb some of the water.

    Turn up the heat briefly and then let it steam on low.

    It takes lots of practice but once you get it, it's like second nature.

    Also you can slice thin potatoe slices and soak them, then put them on the bottom of the pot after you melt the butter but before you add the boiled/drain rice.

    If you like saffron you can mix some with a part of rice  - it looks very pretty on the top but I don't like it.

    The crispy part at the bottom is called tah-deek I think.



    I forgot, before steaming the rice you also want to add some butter or oil to the rice not just to the bottom of the pot. It won't allow me to edit.

    Offline Tiffany

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    Persian cuisine
    « Reply #7 on: July 18, 2012, 10:46:13 AM »
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  • For Fesenjan be careful when using pomegranate juice. Sometimes it's pomegranate syrup and more concentrated. It's not the same but you could also substitute cranberry sauce if you don't have an ethnic store close by.
    It's really good, there is nothing like the test of the walnuts with the chicken, yummm!!! but you may want more sugar than what the recipe calls for.


    Offline theology101

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    « Reply #8 on: July 18, 2012, 11:46:42 AM »
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  • Wow, thanks for all the tips!

    Offline spouse of Jesus

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    « Reply #9 on: July 18, 2012, 02:22:30 PM »
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  •   Tiffany, you are familiar with our foods. wow!

    Offline Tiffany

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    « Reply #10 on: July 18, 2012, 02:39:34 PM »
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  • Carrot rice is also very good. Shred carrots and fry them before adding them to the rice to steam. I think most Americans would like it as it is sweet.

    SoJ I know a few dishes, and I can drink tea without a sugar cube crumbling. ;)


    Offline spouse of Jesus

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    « Reply #11 on: July 18, 2012, 04:21:15 PM »
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  •   Tea with sugar cube is the number one cause of obesity for many. personally I can't begin a day without it!
      Iranian's use of sugar is 2.5 times greater than the world average.

    Offline theology101

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    « Reply #12 on: July 18, 2012, 06:01:51 PM »
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  • Quote from: Tiffany
    Carrot rice is also very good. Shred carrots and fry them before adding them to the rice to steam. I think most Americans would like it as it is sweet.

    SoJ I know a few dishes, and I can drink tea without a sugar cube crumbling. ;)


    Oh, I love carrots too. They are a great snack, very sweet and crunchy.

    Offline Tiffany

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    « Reply #13 on: July 18, 2012, 07:36:36 PM »
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  • I like them too especially with ranch dressing. :)

    If you fry them just becareful of mixing the water from the carrots with the oil :facepalm: that you are prepared for flames!


     

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