Author Topic: H7N9 avian flu found in Tennesse commercial poultry  (Read 1178 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Croix de Fer

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 2497
  • Reputation: +1811/-91
  • Gender: Male
H7N9 avian flu found in Tennesse commercial poultry
« on: March 08, 2017, 09:57:05 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • Preface:

    "After 11 years tracking diseases online I am skeptical of all information. The media can make mistakes and all governments try to control the message. I have no personal knowledge if the HPAI H7N9 in Tennessee is genetically different than the China strain or not.

    "Based on the government's reaction to the Gulf Oil Spill I believe that the US government will act to downplay any threat to public health. However, there is a new US administration. Hopefully there will be a new and more candid approach. I believe each individual state will act in that state's best interest as shown by Florida's response to the Zika threat." ~ editor-in-chief / president of FluTrackers


    https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/newsroom/news/sa_by_date/sa-2017/hpai-tn-update

    Quote
    USDA’s National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) has confirmed the full subtype for the highly pathogenic H7 avian influenza reported in Lincoln County, TN. The virus has been identified as North American wild bird lineage H7N9 HPAI based upon full genome sequence analysis of the samples at the NVSL. All eight gene segments of the virus are North American wild bird lineage. This is NOT the same as the China H7N9 virus that has impacted poultry and infected humans in Asia. While the subtype is the same as the China H7N9 lineage that emerged in 2013, this is a different virus and is genetically distinct from the China H7N9 lineage.

    As additional background, avian influenza viruses are classified by a combination of two groups of proteins: hemagglutinin or “H” proteins, of which there are 16 (H1–H16), and neuraminidase or “N” proteins, of which there are 9 (N1–N9). Many different combinations of “H” and “N” proteins are possible. Each combination is considered a different subtype, and subtypes are further broken down into different strains. Genetically related strains within a subtype are referred to as lineage.

    USDA continues to work with the Tennessee Department of Agriculture on the joint incident response. Birds on the affected premises have been depopulated, and burial is in progress.  An epidemiological investigation is underway to determine the source of the infection.

    Federal and state partners continue to conduct surveillance and testing of poultry within an expanded 10-mile radius around the affected premises to ensure all commercial operations in the area are disease-free. In addition, strict movement controls are in place within an established control zone to prevent the disease from spreading. As of yesterday, all commercial premises within the surveillance area had been tested, and all of the tests from the surrounding facilities were negative for disease. Officials will continue to observe commercial and backyard poultry for signs of influenza, and all flocks in the surveillance zone will be tested again.

    The rapid testing and response in this incident is the result of extensive planning with local, state, federal and industry partners to ensure the most efficient and effective coordination. Since the previous HPAI detections in 2015 and 2016, APHIS and its state and industry partners have learned valuable lessons to help implement stronger preparedness and response capabilities.


    Tennessee Dep of Agriculture announcement

    Unable to embed link:

     https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jnuxAGBj-gk&feature=youtu.be

    [youtube]https://www.youtube.com/embed/jnuxAGBj-gk&feature=[/youtube]

    Blessed be the Lord my God, who teacheth my hands to fight, and my fingers to war. ~ Psalms 143:1 (Douay-Rheims)

    Offline Marlelar

    • Sr. Member
    • ****
    • Posts: 3174
    • Reputation: +1668/-33
    • Gender: Female
    H7N9 avian flu found in Tennesse commercial poultry
    « Reply #1 on: March 08, 2017, 01:50:41 PM »
  • Thanks!1
  • No Thanks!0
  • The reasons for backyard poultry just keep growing.


    Offline Croix de Fer

    • Sr. Member
    • ****
    • Posts: 2497
    • Reputation: +1811/-91
    • Gender: Male
    H7N9 avian flu found in Tennesse commercial poultry
    « Reply #2 on: March 10, 2017, 07:07:29 PM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0

  • Second outbreak of H7N9 bird flu confirmed in Middle Tennessee.

    http://www.timesfreepress.com/news/breakingnews/story/2017/mar/09/second-outbreak-bird-flu-confirmed-middle-tennessee/416839/

    Quote
    A second outbreak of bird flu has been identified in Middle Tennessee as the state veterinarian confirmed a flock of chickens at a commercial poultry breeding operation in Giles County tested positive for low pathogenic avian influenza.

    However, the company that operates the breeding operation is a different business from the one associated with the recent detection of highly pathogenic avian influenza in nearby Lincoln County. At this time, officials do not believe one premises sickened the other.

    On Monday, routine screening tests at the premises in Giles County, just west of Lincoln County, indicated the presence of avian influenza in the flock. State and federal laboratories confirmed the existence of H7N9 LPAI in tested samples.

    "This is why we test and monitor for avian influenza," State Veterinarian Dr. Charles Hatcher said. "When routine testing showed a problem at this facility, the operators immediately took action and notified our lab. That fast response is critical to stopping the spread of this virus."

    As a precaution, the affected flock was depopulated and buried. The premises is under quarantine. Domesticated poultry within a 6.2-mile radius of the site are also under quarantine and are being tested and monitored for illness, officials said.

    To date, all additional samples have tested negative for avian influenza and no other flocks within the area have shown signs of illness, according to officials.


    Blessed be the Lord my God, who teacheth my hands to fight, and my fingers to war. ~ Psalms 143:1 (Douay-Rheims)

    Offline Croix de Fer

    • Sr. Member
    • ****
    • Posts: 2497
    • Reputation: +1811/-91
    • Gender: Male
    H7N9 avian flu found in Tennesse commercial poultry
    « Reply #3 on: March 14, 2017, 08:09:07 PM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • Update 3/14/17:

    Stop Movement Order Issued on Certain Poultry in Alabama, due to three new outbreaks on three different premises.

    Testing for H7N9 avian flu now being done.

    http://www.agi.alabama.gov/s/press-release/stop-movement-order-issued-on-certain-poultry-in-alabama

    Quote
    Montgomery, Ala. — State Veterinarian Dr. Tony Frazier in consultation with Commissioner John McMillan today has issued a stop movement order for certain poultry in Alabama. “The health of poultry is critically important at this time,” said Dr. Frazier. “With three investigations of avian influenza in north Alabama on three separate premises we feel that the stop movement order is the most effective way to implement biosecurity for all poultry in our state.”

    The first two investigations were on two separate premises in north Alabama. One flock of chickens at a commercial breeder operation located in Lauderdale County, Ala. was found to be suspect for avian influenza.  No significant mortality in the flock was reported.  The other premise was a backyard flock in Madison County, Ala. Samples from both premises have been sent to the USDA National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) in Ames, Iowa and are being tested to determine presence of the virus.

    The most recent investigation began following routine surveillance while executing Alabama’s HPAI Preparedness and Response Plan. USDA poultry technicians collected samples at the TaCo-Bet Trade Day flea market in Scottsboro located in Jackson County, Ala. on Sunday, March 12. Samples collected were suspect and those samples are on the way to the USDA Lab in Ames, Iowa.

    Dr. Frazier reminds poultry owners to be vigilant about biosecurity. It is the department’s responsibility to protect backyard flock, exhibition, show and commercial poultry and stopping the movement of certain poultry is the most effective way to do so.

    USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is working closely with the Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries (ADAI) on a joint incident response. The U.S. has the strongest AI surveillance program in the world and USDA is working with its partners to actively look for the disease in commercial poultry operations, backyard birds, live bird markets and in migratory waterfowl populations.

    This suspected strain of avian influenza does not pose a risk to the food supply. No affected poultry entered the food chain. The risk of human infection with avian influenza during poultry outbreaks is very low.  

    “Following the 2015 avian influenza outbreak in the Midwest, planning, preparation, and extensive biosecurity efforts were escalated in Alabama. Industry, growers, state and federal agencies and other stakeholders have worked hard to maintain a level of readiness,” said Commissioner of Agriculture and Industries John McMillan. “Our staff is committed to staying actively involved in the avian influenza situation until any threats are addressed.”

    Dr. Frazier has been working closely with USDA and the Tennessee Department of Agriculture this past week. He encourages commercial poultry producers and backyard flock owners to observe their birds closely and continue to practice strict biosecurity measures. These include:

    •           Isolating poultry from other animals
    •           Wearing clothing designated for use only at the poultry house
    •           Minimizing access to people and unsanitized equipment
    •           Keeping the area around the poultry buildings clean and uninviting to wild birds and animals
    •           Sanitizing the facility between flocks
    •           Cleaning equipment entering and leaving the farm
    •           Having an all in, all out policy regarding the placement and removal of the poultry
    •           Properly disposing of bedding material and mortalities
    •           Avoiding contact with migratory waterfowl        

     Frazier reminds all poultry owners and producers to strictly adhere to the biosecurity guidelines mentioned above. During this time, backyard flock owners should refrain from moving birds offsite or introducing new birds. The ADAI Poultry Division is available to answer any questions concerning movement of poultry and should be notified at 334-240-6584 and/or USDA at 1-866-536-7593 if birds show unusual signs of disease (flu-like symptoms) or flocks experiences unexplained mortalities.

    The Alabama Cooperative Extension System has created a website to assist backyard flock owners with maintaining healthy birds and to provide answers for avian influenza control.  It can be found at www.AlabamaAvianInfluenza.com.

    Blessed be the Lord my God, who teacheth my hands to fight, and my fingers to war. ~ Psalms 143:1 (Douay-Rheims)

    Offline Croix de Fer

    • Sr. Member
    • ****
    • Posts: 2497
    • Reputation: +1811/-91
    • Gender: Male
    Re: H7N9 avian flu found in Tennesse commercial poultry
    « Reply #4 on: March 23, 2017, 03:19:46 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • UPDATE:  H7N9 outbreaks hit Kentucky.

    http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news-perspective/2017/03/kentucky-reports-low-path-h7n9-commercial-flock



    Quote
    Kentucky's agriculture department yesterday announced that tests have confirmed low-pathogenic H7N9 avian flu at a commercial poultry farm, making it the third state to report the virus.
    In related developments, Alabama officials announced that tests have likewise confirmed low-pathogenic H7N9 at two locations in different counties.
    Expanded surveillance
    Robert Stout, DVM, Kentucky's state veterinarian, said in a statement from the Kentucky Department of Agriculture (KDA) that the virus was first detected in routine preslaughter tests on a poultry flock from Christian County that were conducted by the Murray State University Breathitt Veterinary Center in Hopkinsville.
    Christian County is located in western Kentucky near Tennessee's northern border. It is not adjacent to either of the two Tennessee counties that recently reported three H7N9 influenza outbreaks—one involving the low-pathogenic form and two the more worrisome highly pathogenic virus.
    No clinical signs of illness were seen in the birds, and the location was placed under quarantine, with 22,000 hens destroyed as a precaution.
    The US Department of Agriculture National Veterinary Services Laboratory (NVSL) confirmed the H7N9 finding.
    State and federal partners are conducting surveillance in flocks within a 6-mile radius of the affected farm, and the company that owns the farm is doing additional testing at its other facilities in the area.
    Kentucky's poultry and egg industry generated $1.2 billion in 2015, the KDA said.
    Alabama reports 2 more low-path confirmations
    Meanwhile, Alabama officials today announced that two flocks located 170 miles apart have tested positive for low-pathogenic H7N9. One is a commercial operation in Pickens County in the west central part of the state and the other is a backyard holding in Madison County in northern Alabama.
    According to a press release from the Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industry (ADAI), the virus in the Pickens County flock was found during routine screening in tests conducted at the ADAI State Diagnostic Laboratory in Auburn, Ala. The birds have been placed under quarantine, and control measures are under way as a precaution.
    The NVSL also confirmed the findings in the backyard flock from Madison County, and the ADAI said surveillance zones have been placed around the outbreak locations in Pickens and Madison counties.
    Alabama has now reported three low-pathogenic H7N9 detections. On Mar 16 officials said the NVSL had confirmed the virus in guinea fowl from a flea market in Jackson County, which neighbors Madison County.
    A suspected outbreak was also reported in a commercial flock in Lauderdale County, which prompted further testing. Dan Autrey, chief of staff for Alabama agriculture commissioner John McMillan, told CIDRAP News that follow-up tests turned up very little virus. He added that, based on serology tests, the findings are considered presumptive positive for low-pathogenic avian influenza.
    Among the response steps, the state has banned poultry movement in some locations and has temporarily banned poultry exhibitions and assemblies.
    Tony Frazier, DVM, Alabama's state veterinarian, said in the release, "The health of our poultry is critically important at this time. With confirmed cases of low pathogenic avian influenza in Alabama in both commercial and backyard flocks, the order reducing the assembly and commingling of poultry is the most effective way to practice strict biosecurity measures in our state."
    The H7N9 viruses recently detected in the United States are related to North American wild bird lineages and have no connection to the H7N9 strain sickening people and poultry in China.

    Blessed be the Lord my God, who teacheth my hands to fight, and my fingers to war. ~ Psalms 143:1 (Douay-Rheims)


    Offline Croix de Fer

    • Sr. Member
    • ****
    • Posts: 2497
    • Reputation: +1811/-91
    • Gender: Male
    Re: H7N9 avian flu found in Tennesse commercial poultry
    « Reply #5 on: March 27, 2017, 10:46:25 PM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • UPDATE (3/27/17):

    Georgia commercial poultry flock tests positive for H7N9 avian flu.

    To date, since the first case emerged 3 weeks ago, Georgia, Tennessee, Alabama & Kentucky have had poultry that tested positive for the novel avian flu virus.
     
    http://agr.georgia.gov/confirmed-h7-presumptive-low-pathogenic-avian-influenza-in-a-commercial-flock-in-georgia.aspx


    Quote
    Press Release
    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    Monday, March 27, 2017
    Office of Communications
    404-656-3689
    Confirmed H7, Presumptive Low Pathogenic Avian Influenza in a Commercial Flock in Georgia
    A flock of chickens at a commercial poultry breeding operation located in Chattooga County has tested positive for H7, presumptive low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI). This is the first confirmation of avian influenza in domestic poultry in Georgia. Avian influenza does not pose a risk to the food supply, and no affected animals entered the food chain. The risk of human infection with avian influenza during poultry outbreaks is very low.
    The virus was identified during routine pre-sale screening for the commercial facility and was confirmed as H7 avian influenza by the USDA National Veterinary Services Laboratory (NVSL) in Ames, Iowa. As a precaution the affected flock has been depopulated. Officials are testing and monitoring other flocks within the surveillance area and no other flocks have tested positive or experienced any clinical signs.
    The announcement follows similar confirmations from Alabama, Kentucky and Tennessee in recent weeks. The Georgia case is considered a presumptive low pathogenic avian influenza because the flock did not show any signs of illness. While LPAI is different from HPAI, control measures are under way as a precautionary measure. Wild birds are the source of the virus. Avian influenza virus strains often occur naturally in wild birds, and can infect wild migratory birds without causing illness.
    “Poultry is the top sector of our number one industry, agriculture, and we are committed to protecting the livelihoods of the many farm families that are dependent on it,” said Georgia Commissioner of Agriculture Gary W. Black. “In order to successfully do that, it is imperative that we continue our efforts of extensive biosecurity.”
    The official order prohibiting poultry exhibitions and the assembling of poultry to be sold issued by the state veterinarian’s office on March 16, 2017, remains in effect. The order prohibits all poultry exhibitions, sales at regional and county fairs, festivals, swap meets, live bird markets, flea markets, and auctions. The order also prohibits the concentration, collection or assembly of poultry of all types, including wild waterfowl from one or more premises for purposes of sale. Shipments of eggs or baby chicks from National Poultry Improvement Plan (NPIP), Avian Influenza Clean, approved facilities are not affected by this order.
    Owners of poultry flocks are encouraged to closely observe their birds and report a sudden increase in the number of sick birds or bird deaths to the state veterinarian’s office at (855) 491-1432. For more updates and information regarding biosecurity tips visit www.ga-ai.org or www.allinallgone.com.


    Blessed be the Lord my God, who teacheth my hands to fight, and my fingers to war. ~ Psalms 143:1 (Douay-Rheims)

     

    Sitemap 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16