Author Topic: Womens Suffrage  (Read 450 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Philomene Marie

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 84
  • Reputation: +99/-0
  • Gender: Female
Womens Suffrage
« on: January 20, 2013, 03:19:07 PM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • I am in the middle of working on homework and in History we are discussing Women's Suffrage during the Progessive Era.  :sad:  I was just curious what the Church's feelings were on this topic?

    Offline Telesphorus

    • Hero Member
    • *****
    • Posts: 12714
    • Reputation: +7/-12
    • Gender: Male
    Womens Suffrage
    « Reply #1 on: January 20, 2013, 03:57:05 PM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • Quote from: Philomene Marie
    I am in the middle of working on homework and in History we are discussing Women's Suffrage during the Progessive Era.  :sad:  I was just curious what the Church's feelings were on this topic?


    Some old Catholic periodicals would probably cover it.

    However, Arthur Preuss's Fortnightly Review doesn't seem to have anything on it that I can find right away.


    Offline Anthony Benedict

    • Full Member
    • ***
    • Posts: 533
    • Reputation: +509/-2
    • Gender: Male
    Womens Suffrage
    « Reply #2 on: January 20, 2013, 06:05:55 PM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0

  • The earliest organized women's movement in the USA began at Seneca Falls, NY in the mid-19th century.  Cady Stanton was the Jane Fonda/Hillary Clinton of her time, up to a point.  Here's a largely favorable biography of her ( i.e., from the feminist pespective ):

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elizabeth_Cady_Stanton

    Highlighting a few points for you:

    . Stanton was pro-contraception ( a central dogma of feminists, even then! )

    . Stanton wrote her own "bible" ( thus, she was twice a heretic since she was raised a protestant and then foresook formal religion, only to re-invent it in her own fashion )

    . Stanton produced a publication, "Revolution" ( a matter not very well looked upon by the Catholic Church, BEFORE Vatican II, that is... )

    ... you might come to the conclusion that, formally, the views of Stanton, including feminist-inspired "universal suffrage", would likely have been severely criticized by the Catholic Church in the 19th century.

    Another element in your question, however, is whether women DID have a vote in various republics, kingdoms, etc. going back centuries before the American feminist ( and German and Russian/East European communist ) movements ever got under way?

    Some times and places to research are ( courtesy of Fr. Sarda's great work, Liberalism Is A Sin ):

    . the aristocratic republic of Venice

    . the merchant republic of Genoa

    . late 19th century Swiss cantons

    . the Catalognia and Aragon monarchies ( the most "democratic" mixed
    monarchies of their day in the Middle Ages )

    . the elective monarchy of Poland


    Offline Anthony Benedict

    • Full Member
    • ***
    • Posts: 533
    • Reputation: +509/-2
    • Gender: Male
    Womens Suffrage
    « Reply #3 on: January 20, 2013, 06:21:13 PM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • Sorry, meant that the governmens listed were Catholic.

    Thus, if women could vote in them then you have a case for the Church allowing women's suffrage.

     

    Sitemap 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16