Author Topic: Thriving in the age of collapse  (Read 912 times)

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Offline Matthew

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Thriving in the age of collapse
« on: September 02, 2006, 08:58:03 AM »
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    Offline Matthew

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    Thriving in the age of collapse
    « Reply #1 on: September 02, 2006, 09:54:54 AM »
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  • I find it especially interesting because he was in Russia during a collapse -- so he must have learned a lot.

    The fact that what he recommends is the same advice I heard from other people (try to remove dependence on Wal-mart, try to pay off your mortgage, start a garden, etc.) makes it even more valid.

    Matthew
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    Offline thecolorandthenoise

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    Thriving in the age of collapse
    « Reply #2 on: September 03, 2006, 04:00:26 PM »
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  • Quote from: Trinity
    My husband and I once started what we called a "Repository".  Simply put, we opened our garage for people to put their unwanted items (mostly left overs from yard sales) and for others to come get whatever they wanted or needed.  

    It was highly successful.  We were able to set a number of people up in complete housekeeping and sent a huge truckload of clothes to Haiti.  That's just aside from the normal flow people.

    That is totally awesome!

    Quote
    The neighbors hated it, complained to the cops, stoned the people who came for things, etc.  After four years we escaped to the woods and this project was abandoned.

    We tried to start a bartering system but I guess it was just too easy to run to Walmart.  No one was interested.

    Ugh. I knew it sounded too good to be true. &*%@ neighbors ruined everything. Grrr.

    Offline Matthew

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    Thriving in the age of collapse
    « Reply #3 on: September 03, 2006, 04:12:19 PM »
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  • You'd almost have to find like-minded people (mostly Catholics) who are interested in not being wasteful, and have an interest in becoming more independent from "the system".

    Usually when you grow vegetables, fruits, etc. you have WAY more than you need -- wouldn't it be great if I could grow a bunch of cantaloupes and trade them for things I didn't bother growing? That would be a win-win for everyone concerned.

    Same goes for seeds -- I'll give you some of my extra seeds, and you give me some of your extra, so we can both plant more than we spent money on. Usually seeds are cheaper in bulk anyhow.

    Especially if you want to try to dry your own seeds from fruits you grow (assuming the fruits were grown from organic or "heirloom" seeds), it can be a bit of work. But if you only have to do 1/3 of them, because 2 other families are participating, it would be so much better.

    Matthew
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    Offline thecolorandthenoise

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    Thriving in the age of collapse
    « Reply #4 on: September 03, 2006, 04:15:24 PM »
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  • It's hard to pull this off, because like minded traditional Catholics live so far from each other.  :sad:


    Offline Matthew

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    Thriving in the age of collapse
    « Reply #5 on: September 03, 2006, 04:36:42 PM »
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  • Yes, they'd have to take care of such bartering in the parish hall after Mass, over coffee and donuts :)

    I spent the first 2 years at my San Antonio chapel thinking no one there even had a garden (I was mostly right) and then I discover that one older gentleman there drives 2 1/2+ hours to Mass, and has a lot of land, chickens, an orchard, you name it.  AND he knows all about the situation in the world (he'd fit in here)

    He's not even computer illiterate. A well balanced, wise old man. He works his land himself. He leads the Rosary before Mass at our chapel, and is one of the men who takes up the collection every Sunday.

    It's so refreshing to talk to someone of like mind (in person). Usually I have to either talk to a traditional Catholic, or someone who is trying to be independent from "the system" and who knows about the dangers of mєdια, the banks, etc.
    It's not too often I get both in the same person!

    Matthew
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    Offline thecolorandthenoise

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    Thriving in the age of collapse
    « Reply #6 on: September 03, 2006, 05:10:12 PM »
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  • Quote from: Trinity
    One thing you can recycle is candles.

    Yeah, I save all my beeswax stumps (100% beeswax is crazy expensive!) and I plan on melting them all down and making new candles out of them after I pick up some cotton wicks.

    Offline thecolorandthenoise

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    Thriving in the age of collapse
    « Reply #7 on: September 03, 2006, 05:29:09 PM »
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  • Quote from: Trinity
    Are beeswax candles pure beeswax?

    Depends on where you buy them from. Most are 51% beeswax, mine are 100%.

    Quote
    Do you know how the beeswax is processed from the comb?

    I do not.


     

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