Author Topic: The Sabbath  (Read 1016 times)

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Offline Conspiracy_Factist

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The Sabbath
« on: February 14, 2015, 10:03:02 AM »
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  • Being married to someone who isn't traditional we argue over what can be done on a Sunday, out of the following which  one's  should I fight her over, not sure which if any are definite no no's , also I'd like to hear some suggestions on what you do on Sunday's with your kids

    taking daughter to violin lesson
    cooking for supper,
    going to see a movie

    Offline BTNYC

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    The Sabbath
    « Reply #1 on: February 14, 2015, 04:26:10 PM »
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  • Taking the daughter to a violin lesson is an unnecessary exchange of money for servile work.

    Cooking for dinner is fine - your family has to eat, so it's necessary work. We're not Jews, after all.

    Going to a movie is another unnecessary exchange of money for servile work. And as the overwhelming majority of films are soul-rotting slush, not going to the movies is nearly always a good idea (not just on Sundays).

    Sundays are days for prayer and rest. There are plenty of things to do with the family (games, reading, hikes, nature walks, bike riding, playing, etc) that don't require performing / paying for needless servile work.


    Offline Conspiracy_Factist

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    The Sabbath
    « Reply #2 on: February 15, 2015, 04:25:49 PM »
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  • Quote from: BTNYC
    Taking the daughter to a violin lesson is an unnecessary exchange of money for servile work.

    Cooking for dinner is fine - your family has to eat, so it's necessary work. We're not Jews, after all.

    Going to a movie is another unnecessary exchange of money for servile work. And as the overwhelming majority of films are soul-rotting slush, not going to the movies is nearly always a good idea (not just on Sundays).

    Sundays are days for prayer and rest. There are plenty of things to do with the family (games, reading, hikes, nature walks, bike riding, playing, etc) that don't require performing / paying for needless servile work.


    The violin lessons will be changed for another date, went easier than I thought..as for movies I agree but it's a constant batttle with the wife,

    how about  buying coffee at a coffee shop would that be a no no also?

    Offline JoeZ

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    The Sabbath
    « Reply #3 on: February 15, 2015, 05:30:21 PM »
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  • Quote from: Conspiracy_Factist


    how about  buying coffee at a coffee shop would that be a no no also?


    Sunday at our home is treated like a mini feast day. We make it a point to eat a little better, indulge in flavored coffees, and have a weekly icecream treat at the end of the day. This is actually a bit more work for the women in my house compared to week days and since my wife of over 26 years has "paid her dues", I often purchase these services, on Sunday, so she can enjoy the day of rest. Some one has to do the necessary work and so if I can make a younger person (through the use of my money) do the work so my wife doesn't have too, I am happy to do so.

    God bless,
    Joez
    Pray the Holy Rosary.

    Offline Lighthouse

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    The Sabbath
    « Reply #4 on: February 15, 2015, 05:48:06 PM »
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  • As much as I normally favor the thinking of BTNYC, he is not a moral theologian, and you might want to consult a competent priest.

    One should be very careful to handle bits from the internet quite gingerly.

    I don't think I remember anything about the bishops giving the cooking staff every Sunday off. Also, Sundays were a common day for fairs, processions, and the like,that contained many types of skits leavened with amusements.

    Servile labor does  not  include anything that would be mild and non-exerting. Prurient entertainment, of course, is never a good thing.

    But I am not a theologian either, and some of the problems arising could be a bit complicated.


    Offline Conspiracy_Factist

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    The Sabbath
    « Reply #5 on: February 15, 2015, 06:39:44 PM »
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  • Quote from: Lighthouse
    As much as I normally favor the thinking of BTNYC, he is not a moral theologian, and you might want to consult a competent priest.

    One should be very careful to handle bits from the internet quite gingerly.

    I don't think I remember anything about the bishops giving the cooking staff every Sunday off. Also, Sundays were a common day for fairs, processions, and the like,that contained many types of skits leavened with amusements.

    Servile labor does  not  include anything that would be mild and non-exerting. Prurient entertainment, of course, is never a good thing.

    But I am not a theologian either, and some of the problems arising could be a bit complicated.


    not sure what you are disagreeing, he said making dinner was fine

    Offline Lighthouse

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    The Sabbath
    « Reply #6 on: February 15, 2015, 08:56:47 PM »
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  • Maybe "disagreement" is too strong. I just do not think paying for a meal is necessarily wrong, or enjoying some entertainment is out of the question.

    Some priests will say that an infrequent vacation with no Mass available, especially in these times, is permissible.
     


    Offline Conspiracy_Factist

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    The Sabbath
    « Reply #7 on: February 15, 2015, 10:34:22 PM »
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  • Quote from: Lighthouse
    Maybe "disagreement" is too strong. I just do not think paying for a meal is necessarily wrong, or enjoying some entertainment is out of the question.

    Some priests will say that an infrequent vacation with no Mass available, especially in these times, is permissible.
     


    oh, got you, that's the question, is it permissible to even buy a coffee, take a vacation and skip mass is another issue but wouldn't mind getting other opinions on this


     

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