Author Topic: Spelling Challenge  (Read 5418 times)

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Online Nadir

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Re: Spelling Challenge
« Reply #90 on: January 30, 2019, 04:12:52 AM »
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    It’s not scriptural at all but comes from the heretic, John Calvin, who's extremism caused him to believe in such false notions.

    Who's or whose?

    Who’s is a contraction of  who is or who has.

    If you are confused as to when to put an apostrophe try replacing the apostrophe with the missing letter.


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    It is not scriptural at all but comes from the heretic, John Calvin, who is extremism caused him to believe in such false notions.

    Doesn't make sense does it.


    The correct word here is whose - a possessive pronoun used here as an adjective: 

    Whose cat killed the rat?  


    Whose is the possessive form of who  used as an adjective, meaning belongs to whom .
    Whose painting won the Archibald prize?

    Or the possessive form of which used as an adjective, meaning belongs to which.
    A town whose name escapes me.


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    It’s not scriptural at all but comes from the heretic, John Calvin, whose extremism caused him to believe in such false notions.


    Offline AlligatorDicax

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    Time per UTC/Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #91 on: February 03, 2019, 12:44:28 PM »
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  • At 0500 UT, it would be 4:00 PM PST.

    Huh?   That's a difference in UTC of 13 hours westward (+5, -8 hours).  Or 11 hours eastward (i.e., UTC+11).  For what abbreviated "P" in PST would that be true?

    If "P" is inended to signify the Pacific Standard Time of North America, the difference in UTC is only 8 hours westward (i.e., UTC-8).
    •  At 0500 UT, it would be 4:00 9:00 PM PST, in that Pacific Standard Time.
    •  At 0500 0000 UT, it would be 4:00 PM PST, also in that Pacific Standard Time.

    The quoted time-zone translation is true for New Caledonia, the Solomon Is., and the Loyalty Is. in the S.W. Pacific, but I'm puzzled about where one would find a prominent "P" for naming a time-zone.
    •  Petropavlovsk (Kamchatka, Russian Far East)?  No, it's 1 time-zone (UTC+12) too far east.
    •  Papua New Guinea (British Commonwealth)?  No, it's 1 time-zone  (UTC+10) too far west.
    •  Perth (Western Oz)?  No, it's 3 time-zones (UTC+8) too far west, as also are Rep. of Philippines and Peking [*].

    -------
    Note *: The latter name is certainly on-topic for "spelling" (but if anyone wants to pursue it, its pursuit probably ought to be in a separate new topic): "Peking" is the spelling according to the Wade-Giles romanization of Chinese, developed by 2 Brits from their experience as diplomats in China in the 19th Century.  Their spellings prevailed in English (notably on maps) until the 1970s or 1980s.  <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wade%E2%80%93Giles>.


    Offline clare

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #92 on: February 04, 2019, 09:00:21 AM »
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    ... to fall pray to ...

    ... prey...

    Online Nadir

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #93 on: February 18, 2019, 03:54:32 AM »
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    Who Did More Damage: Elvis or The Beetles?


    Beetle - Beatle
    Do not confuse the two homophones -  beetle and Beatle.
    beetle (noun) is
    1. an insect, one of an enormous number of species in the order coleoptera.
    2. a type of heavy hammer, rammer or pounder. Both the word and the tool are  not in common use nowadays.
     To beetle (verb):
    1. To overhang. A seaside cliff may 'beetle over the shore'. hence beetle-browed, meaning 'having over-hanging eyebrows'. The entomologist Charles Darwin could in later life have been appropriately described as 'beetle-browed', as could Rudyard Kipling, whose schoolboy nickname was Beetle.
    2. The second is 'to move in an undignified manner', 'to move aimlessly, like the insect'. This was first used of aeroplanes around the time of World War 1.
    3. To strike with a beetle [hammer, or rammer]. This word is now obsolete.

    Beatle (noun) is one of four members of a musical group whose name was chosen because they played music with an insistent beat, as well as being a reference to Buddy Holly's band, the Crickets. While there are many species of beetle, and millions of individuals, there were only four Beatles: John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr,
     

    Online Nadir

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #94 on: February 18, 2019, 09:24:41 PM »
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    I'm asking this in regards to the lecture I attended last night.

    Interestingly, the poster who wrote “in regards to” also acknowledged that “modern language, especially modern English, is a butchered language”, which is kind of ironic!
    .
    "In regards to" seems to have fairly recently popped into the language.
    The correct phrase is singular: "in regard to."
    The three word phrase could be replaced by one word, “regarding”, "concerning" or even “about”. For example:
    .
    This letter is in regard to your kind invitation.
    I write concerning your kind invitation.
    This letter is about your kind invitation.
    .
    What could be confusing the issue is:
    As regards is used to introduce a new or different issue.


    Online Nadir

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #95 on: February 22, 2019, 10:32:46 PM »
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    I am a misogynist by normie standards. But I do not hate women at all in reality…

    The writer has demonstrated many times that he is a thorough gentleman, so this post puzzled me. And it seemed to me surprising, he did not know the meaning of the word “misogynist”, but I was wrong. He was using it in some sort of a different sense.

    To me saying 
    “I am a misogynist … But I do not hate women” 
    is like saying 
    “I am a canine but I am not a dog”.

    To complicate matters the word “normie” is unfamiliar to me, as also the expression “normie standards” makes no sense to me. I am still working that out.

    But how many meanings has the word “misogyny”. 
    Only one, as far as I can decipher.

    Etymonline tells us:
    misogyny (n.)
    "hatred of women," 1650s, from Modern Latin misogynia, from Greek misogynia
    abstract noun from misogynēs "woman-hater,"

    from miso- "hatred" (see miso-) + gynē "woman" (from PIE root *gwen-"woman").
     
    I have just discovered that I possibly could be a misoneist "hater of novelty", especially as far as language goes.

    Now the question of “normie” is for another post maybe. Can anyone enlighten me?



    Online Nadir

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #96 on: February 22, 2019, 10:36:36 PM »
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  • Oh, here's some more gyn words.

    androgynous; gynarchy; gynecology; gynecomastia; polygyny.

    Interestingly enough the Australian aboriginals refer to their women as gins.

    Offline forlorn

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #97 on: February 23, 2019, 06:24:17 AM »
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  • The writer has demonstrated many times that he is a thorough gentleman, so this post puzzled me. And it seemed to me surprising, he did not know the meaning of the word “misogynist”, but I was wrong. He was using it in some sort of a different sense.

    To me saying
    “I am a misogynist … But I do not hate women”
    is like saying
    “I am a canine but I am not a dog”.

    To complicate matters the word “normie” is unfamiliar to me, as also the expression “normie standards” makes no sense to me. I am still working that out.

    But how many meanings has the word “misogyny”.
    Only one, as far as I can decipher.

    Etymonline tells us:
    misogyny (n.)
    "hatred of women," 1650s, from Modern Latin misogynia, from Greek misogynia,
    abstract noun from misogynēs "woman-hater,"

    from miso- "hatred" (see miso-) + gynē "woman" (from PIE root *gwen-"woman").
     
    I have just discovered that I possibly could be a misoneist "hater of novelty", especially as far as language goes.

    Now the question of “normie” is for another post maybe. Can anyone enlighten me?
    Normie is just internet slang for ordinary people. Usually it's used by 4chan types to refer to people who don't use their site or else people who haven't been "redpilled" so to speak, but in this case that guy meant normie as in someone who drank the feminist kool-aid - which is the vast majority of regular Joes out there these days.

    He recognised that it's not the proper definition of misogyny. What he's saying is that according to how they misuse it(to mean anyone who's not a feminist), that he'd be a misogynist according to their false definition.


    Offline Matto

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #98 on: February 23, 2019, 09:00:38 AM »
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  • Forlorn is correct about what I meant. I do have a fondness for the term "normie". It is internet slang. As I understand it, "normie" is a word used by members of counter-cultural or isolated or marginalized groups to refer to regular people who are not a part of those groups and do not understand them. I believe I am fond of the term because I consider myself to be isolated and marginalized and not "normal" in the eyes of society. So as traditional Catholics, we could call Novus Ordo Catholics "normies" or "normie Catholics". The term may or may not be derogatory, but I generally don't take it to be an insult like the term "NPC." I learned the word from Youtube. There is a member there whose videos I watch who considers himself to be a part of the "Forever Alone" community which is a group of mostly troubled men who have difficulty having relationships with women and are lonely. He sometimes calls regular people who have relationships "normies" and talks about how they often do not understand lonely men and have contempt for them and offer bad advice.
    I Love Watching Butterflies . . ..

    Online Nadir

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #99 on: February 24, 2019, 12:24:38 AM »
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  • Normie is just internet slang for ordinary people. Usually it's used by 4chan types to refer to people who don't use their site or else people who haven't been "redpilled" so to speak, but in this case that guy meant normie as in someone who drank the feminist kool-aid - which is the vast majority of regular Joes out there these days.

    He recognised that it's not the proper definition of misogyny. What he's saying is that according to how they misuse it(to mean anyone who's not a feminist), that he'd be a misogynist according to their false definition.
    Thank you, Forlorn, for your explanation. Much appreciated. Though I must say that I still needed to decipher some of the language you have used even in this explanation. Sometimes I feel like I have fallen down a rabbit hole, like Alice. It is all so foreign! I need to employ an interpreter, what with 4chan, red-pilled kool-aid, normie. I'm not meant for this world!

    Offline MaterDominici

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #100 on: February 24, 2019, 12:39:08 AM »
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  • There is a member there whose videos I watch who considers himself to be a part of the "Forever Alone" community which is a group of mostly troubled men who have difficulty having relationships with women and are lonely. He sometimes calls regular people who have relationships "normies" and talks about how they often do not understand lonely men and have contempt for them and offer bad advice.
    Probably not a very good use of the term as his situation is much more normal than he thinks it is.
    "If I could only make the faithful sing the Kyrie, the Gloria, the Credo, the Sanctus and the Agnus Dei ... that would be to me the finest triumph sacred music could have, for it is in really taking part in the liturgy that the faithful will preserve their devotion. I would take the Tantum ...


    Online Nadir

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #101 on: February 24, 2019, 01:10:38 AM »
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  • Thank you, Matto, for your post enlightening. Yes, our society has really failed in the relationship and communication sectors. We struggle on to make sense of it all.

    Offline forlorn

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #102 on: February 24, 2019, 03:49:21 AM »
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  • Thank you, Forlorn, for your explanation. Much appreciated. Though I must say that I still needed to decipher some of the language you have used even in this explanation. Sometimes I feel like I have fallen down a rabbit hole, like Alice. It is all so foreign! I need to employ an interpreter, what with 4chan, red-pilled kool-aid, normie. I'm not meant for this world!
    4chan is just an anonymous messaging board. 

    Redpilled is a tougher one to explain. Someone might call themselves redpilled if they think they can see through lies about the world that "normies" accept and believe. It's mostly used in reference to race or the Jews. If someone says they're "redpilled" on the Jews, it means they believe in the Jewish conspiracy. One could say they were "redpilled" on Vatican 2 if they realised it for the heretical council it really is and not some "vibrant progressive council" nonsense that most believe. 

    The term comes from the film "The Matrix" where the protagonist could take a blue pill and live in blissful ignorance, or take a red pill and be shown the horrible truth about the world. 

    Drinking the koolaid comes from a cult in the 70s I think, that committed mass suicide by drinking poisoned koolaid. Drinking the koolaid refers to blindly following/believing someone against all rationality.

    Online Nadir

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #103 on: February 24, 2019, 02:33:37 PM »
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  • Thanks , Forlorn. before replying I had sussed out the first two, but not the third. It's good, not  only to understand the meaning, but to know from where it originates.

    Online Nadir

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #104 on: April 11, 2019, 04:51:02 PM »
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    no woman can follow or accept any tenant of feminism and still claim to be a Christian 
    The bolded word is often misused, in lieu of the correct word here which is TENET.  

    We all know what a tenant is but....

    A tenet is a principle, belief, or doctrine generally held to be true especially one held in common by members of an organization, movement, or profession.

     

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