Author Topic: Spelling Challenge  (Read 5499 times)

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Offline Neil Obstat

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Re: Spelling Challenge
« Reply #15 on: November 15, 2018, 04:17:51 AM »
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  • Why doesn't cloves rhyme with gloves :confused:
    .
    Why doesn't love rhyme with move :confused:
    .
    Who can explain these English language discrepancies?
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    Cloves rhymes with droves, groves, By Jove's, coves and stoves.
    .
    Gloves rhymes with above's, doves, shoves and loves.
    .
    Love rhymes with above, dove (the bird) and wuv. (Wuv is +W's very seldom used silly-word for love.)
    .
    Move rhymes with behoove and groove. So why isn't it spelled moove, or just moov? Final e should make the o long, like in moave.
    .--. .-.-.- ... .-.-.- ..-. --- .-. - .... . -.- .. -. --. -.. --- -- --..-- - .... . .--. --- .-- . .-. .- -. -.. -....- -....- .--- ..- ... - -.- .. -.. -.. .. -. --. .-.-.

    Offline 1st Mansion Tenant

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #16 on: November 15, 2018, 12:00:36 PM »
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  • :)  When you said ducksearch, I visualized a pretty iridescent black and white Muscovy drake nodding his large red head forward and backwards as he walks. How do ducks manage to walk and to nod their heads at the same time without getting dizzy? And yet, while they are searching for the next slug, snail or silver legless lizard to grab in their beaks, they continue to nod.

    For more information on Muscovy ducks or for information on raising them for their delicious eggs, do a duckduckgo.com search.


    God is so delightful in His creatures.

    My personal opinion is that people who dislike ducks are highly suspect. However, ducks are known for their lack of spelling and grammatical acumen.   :D


    Offline Neil Obstat

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #17 on: November 15, 2018, 02:10:56 PM »
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  • .
    What drives some of us crazy is the misspelling of you as one letter: u. 
    .
    Now that's showing up on signs posting announcements for all viewers.
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                                               ... could make it "b4 u enter"
    .
    .
    Would u wear this button? 
    .
    Might be a personal message: 
    .

    British No U Turn signs:                                                
      
    (It was a political message: British Government U-Turn On Euro Constitution -- LONDON - APRIL 19: A 'No U-Turn' road sign is seen near the British Houses of Parliament on April 19, 2004 in London, England. The British government seems set to announce plans for a referendum on a European Union constitution which is being seen as a major U-turn by British Prime Minister Tony Blair. (Photo by Scott Barbour/Getty Images))
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    Sometimes it's not really information that's being posted.....
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    Some people seem to treat spelling as a religion...
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    Offline Neil Obstat

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #18 on: November 15, 2018, 02:24:09 PM »
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  • .
    Danny Glover's name is all around "love." 
    .
    GLOVER & GIBSON
    .--. .-.-.- ... .-.-.- ..-. --- .-. - .... . -.- .. -. --. -.. --- -- --..-- - .... . .--. --- .-- . .-. .- -. -.. -....- -....- .--- ..- ... - -.- .. -.. -.. .. -. --. .-.-.

    Online Nadir

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #19 on: November 15, 2018, 03:01:20 PM »
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  • Quote: Neil
    Quote
    None of these words in quotes  is  [are] mine!  .................... you're welcome.
    .
    The test you use to prove the text right is this: omit words between (e.g., "in quotes") and see if it's right: "...these words ... are mine."
    That is obviously better than "...these words ... is mine." Corrected form: None of these words in quotes are mine.
    Neil, You are reasoning like a turnip!  :jester:

    I said "None ...... is mine". None indicates negation (not one). Now "one" is singular and any more than one is plural. So if one is singular what is less than one? Could less than one possibly be plural?  "None" is an abbreviated form of "not one".

    From https://dictionary.cambridge.org/grammar/british-grammar/quantifiers/no-none-and-none-of

    In formal styles, we use none of with a singular verb when it is the subject. However, in informal speaking, people often use plural verbs:
    Quote
    None of that surprises me.

    Quote
    Indeed, none of his novels is well shaped or well written.

    Quote
    None of the products have been tested on animals and all the bottles are recyclable.(informal)



    Offline Emitte Lucem Tuam

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #20 on: November 15, 2018, 07:14:47 PM »
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  • Unfortunately, in this day and age, ignorance of proper English, and spoken English slang are the choice, when it comes to English grammar and spoken English, in the 21st century.  This includes both North American English, United Kingdom English, Australian English and South African English along with the Caribbean English dialects. Correct English grammar and pronounciation will never change, BUT the willingness to use “proper English”, regardless of national pronouciation/grammar will ALWAYS be an effort and an ordeal.  Proper classical English is a beautiful language...it is so unfortunate that most English speakers, planet wide, revert to slang and ignorant speaking when conversing with their fellow human beings in the English language.

    Online Nadir

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #21 on: November 17, 2018, 02:36:40 PM »
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  • Quote
    And whom will be the real rulers the Zionist Jews enforcing Talmudic laws.
    These are two sentences written as one.
    And whom will be the real rulers. The Zionist Jews enforcing Talmudic laws.

    Tip:
    Use who for the subject.
    Use whom for the object.

    Who is at the door? Who is the subject of the verb is.
    Whom did you see at the door? Whom is the object of the verb see.
    To whom is he speaking? Whom should be used as the object of a preposition.



    Offline Maria Regina

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #22 on: November 17, 2018, 05:48:00 PM »
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  • These are two sentences written as one.
    And whom will be the real rulers. The Zionist Jews enforcing Talmudic laws.

    Tip:
    Use who for the subject.
    Use whom for the object.

    Who is at the door? Who is the subject of the verb is.
    Whom did you see at the door? Whom is the object of the verb see.
    To whom is he speaking? Whom should be used as the object of a preposition.U
    Sometimes substituting a personal pronoun helps.

    Who is at the door?
    Is he at the door?
    He is at the door.
    Since he is the subject, the correct relative pronoun will be who.

    Whom did you see at the door?
    You saw whom at the door?
    Did you see him at the door?
    Since him is the object of the verb, whom is the correct relative pronoun.

    To whom is he speaking?
    He is speaking to whom?
    He is speaking to him.
    Since him is the object of the preposition "to," whom is the correct relative pronoun.
    Lord have mercy.


    Offline Student of Qi

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #23 on: November 17, 2018, 10:51:28 PM »
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  • English spelling can be a nightmare. There are just so many different rules to learn and so many exceptions to rules, and many different ways to pronounce any particular letter, unlike say Italian, which has basic rules which always apply,
    .
    I’ve noticed that, since I first signed up to CathInfo, the standards of written English, in particular spelling, has gradually declined.  I am not speaking of mistakes made because members don’t reread to make corrections, but persistent mistakes which illustrate that the writer does not understand the formation or meaning of the word.
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    So I have been wondering for a while how to approach this. This morning I did some reading from an anonymous thread and I discovered several mistakes, and decided to collect and try to correct – of course, on a new non-anonymous thread.
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    So here we go. Feel free to add your own contributions or comments. I hope to add more as they appear. Not naming the poster of wrong spelling, of course, though she/she may recognise themselves.
    Thanks, Nadir. I always find these kinds of threads useful. I havent looked over the entirety of this one, but would like to say that a lot of spelling and or grammatical errors are also due to people spelling words the way they say them. Non native speakers I talk with tend to do this, and even I do too, as you've certainly noticed. It's pretty common for a number of young Americans too, though we should really try to do better since everyone wants to speak our type of English. 😅
    Many people say "For the Honor and Glory of God!" but, what they should say is "For the Love, Glory and Honor of God". - Fr. Paul of Moll

    Online Nadir

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #24 on: November 17, 2018, 11:45:12 PM »
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  • Nice to get your feedback, Student of Qi. So you recognised yours!  :)


    Quote
    .... a lot of spelling and or grammatical errors are also due to people spelling words the way they say them.
    Yes, but that is the difficulty with English. My husband, who is not a native English speaker, tells me that in his school days there was no need for spelling lessons as the English speakers need. You simply spell words exactly as they are pronounced, and once you've learned a comparatively small number of sounds, away you go. Home and hosed! Every vowel is sounded and none is superfluous, like the "k" in knife.

    For some. spelling just does not come easily. Now, if you were Chinese that would be a different story altogether. You would have to get out your brush and illustrate your story or whatever.

    Yes, wherever you go, the people want to learn English.

    Online Nadir

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #25 on: November 26, 2018, 09:29:28 PM »
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  • Quote
    In regards to your question about how to use ...
    In regard to and with regard to are phrases that mean "regarding," "concerning," "on the subject of."
    As regards—note the s on the end—means the same thing. Perhaps this is why people mindlessly pluralize regard and say in regards to and its partner in crime, with regards to.
    Both of the following examples are correct: With regard to your friend, let's hope she is well. Compare that to With regards to your friend. Let's hope she is well.
    In the first sentence, With regard to means "concerning." But in the second sentence, regards with an s is a plural noun meaning "best wishes."


    Online Nadir

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #26 on: December 01, 2018, 04:52:33 PM »
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  • Apologies for the huge letters in last post.

    ---------------

    The confusion between then and than seems to be of fairly recent origin, and I believe it stems from hearing poor diction.


    Quote
    Husbands job … show more progress then cleaning house/raising kids.

    Corrections: 
    Husband's job … shows more progress than cleaning house/raising kids.
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    Think: then rhymes with when so refers to timing. This sentence does not refer to timing, but rather to comparing two different jobs.
    .
    Then means (at) that time (in the past or in the future):
    Examples:
    I was working in the city then.
    Give it to me next week - I won't have time to read it before then.
    Call tomorrow - then I should have the details.
    .
    Compare with
    .
    Than - preposition, conjunction 
    • ·      is used to join two parts of a comparison:

    My son is taller than my daughter. (son compared with daughter)
    You walk faster than I do! (you compared with me)
    You're earlier than usual. (present compared with past)

    • ·      Or is used with "more" or "less" to compare numbers or amounts:

    I spent more than I intended to.
    It cost less than I expected.
     

    Offline Maria Regina

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #27 on: December 01, 2018, 05:22:29 PM »
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  • Apologies for the huge letters in last post.

    ---------------

    The confusion between then and than seems to be of fairly recent origin, and I believe it stems from hearing poor diction.


    Corrections:
    Husband's job … shows more progress than cleaning house/raising kids.
    .
    Think: then rhymes with when so refers to timing. This sentence does not refer to timing, but rather to comparing two different jobs.
    .
    Then means (at) that time (in the past or in the future):
    Examples:
    I was working in the city then.
    Give it to me next week - I won't have time to read it before then.
    Call tomorrow - then I should have the details.
    .
    Compare with
    .
    Than - preposition, conjunction
    • ·      is used to join two parts of a comparison:

    My son is taller than my daughter. (son compared with daughter)
    You walk faster than I do! (you compared with me)
    You're earlier than usual. (present compared with past)

    • ·      Or is used with "more" or "less" to compare numbers or amounts:

    I spent more than I intended to.
    It cost less than I expected.
     
    Another reason for misspelling the two words, then and than, can be due to old age and/or diabetes, which can cause blurry vision.
    With only 10 to 15 minutes to edit my posts here at CI, many typographical errors go unnoticed. Factoring in all the robo-calls I receive at home, this distraction causes even more mistakes to go unnoticed.

    I wish there was some way to stop all the robo calls. My own brother-in-law lowered the volume of his phone ringer so that  no one could contact him. Then when we finally were able to contact him, we discovered that he had been given a diagnosis of terminal cancer. It was too late to visit him as there was not enough time to make travel arrangements.
    Lord have mercy.

    Online Nadir

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #28 on: December 01, 2018, 05:57:33 PM »
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  • I am almost always timed out. You just need to click post again. It's always worked for me. It's a good idea to write first on a word document and that makes less problem with formatting, as in the case of my penultimate post. Besides, I have not noticed mistakes in your posts, Maria Regina.
    .
    But we are not talking about typos here. We are talking about oft repeated errors due to poor knowledge of language. It is mainly younger posters who have problems with the spelling / grammar / formation of the language.

    Offline Neil Obstat

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    Re: Spelling Challenge
    « Reply #29 on: December 01, 2018, 06:40:20 PM »
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  • Quote: NeilNeil, You are reasoning like a turnip!  :jester:

    I said "None ...... is mine". None indicates negation (not one). Now "one" is singular and any more than one is plural. So if one is singular what is less than one? Could less than one possibly be plural?  "None" is an abbreviated form of "not one".

    From https://dictionary.cambridge.org/grammar/british-grammar/quantifiers/no-none-and-none-of

    In formal styles, we use none of with a singular verb when it is the subject. However, in informal speaking, people often use plural verbs:
    .
    Therefore, according to your principle, the following are properly rendered with the singular verb, "is":
    .
    None of the US presidents is women. (in lieu of "None ... are women.")
    .
    None of Alaska's earthquakes since 1964 is so strong as this one. (in lieu of "None ... are so strong...")
    .
    None of my socks is lost in the dryer. (in lieu of "None ... are lost...")
    .
    None of the stars in the sky is brighter than the moon.
    .
    None of the cans on the shelf is dented.
    .
    None of these used cars is for sale.
    .
    None of the police officers is out of uniform, sir.
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    None of the ships at sea is sinking.
    .
    None of the people using the Internet is sleeping.
    .
    None of the hairs on your head is gray.
    .
    None of our Christmas trees is dry.
    .
    None of these houses is available.
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    None of these sentences is correct.
    .
    None of these dog's fleas is immune.
    .
    None of these radio commercials is interesting.
    .--. .-.-.- ... .-.-.- ..-. --- .-. - .... . -.- .. -. --. -.. --- -- --..-- - .... . .--. --- .-- . .-. .- -. -.. -....- -....- .--- ..- ... - -.- .. -.. -.. .. -. --. .-.-.

     

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