Author Topic: Serious food emergency!  (Read 618 times)

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Offline Matthew

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Serious food emergency!
« on: June 19, 2008, 09:36:35 AM »
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    Offline Matthew

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    Serious food emergency!
    « Reply #1 on: June 19, 2008, 10:33:33 AM »
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    Offline gladius_veritatis

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    Serious food emergency!
    « Reply #2 on: June 19, 2008, 01:28:34 PM »
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  • Whatever your plans are, if you are not ALREADY EXECUTING them, you will have a problem - SOON.  

    GET ON WITH IT.
    + Vincit veritas +

    Offline Alex

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    Serious food emergency!
    « Reply #3 on: June 19, 2008, 03:29:58 PM »
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  • So what are we supposed to do to prepare for this emergency? Are only those already slightly struggling supposed to prepare?

    Offline veritas

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    Serious food emergency!
    « Reply #4 on: June 20, 2008, 10:52:37 AM »
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  • Floods Likely Biggest Ag Disaster Ever In Indiana
    Nearly 10 Percent Of Corn, Soybean Crops Flooded



    TheIndyChannel.com
    POSTED: 3:34 pm EDT June 19, 2008
    UPDATED: 8:44 am EDT June 20, 2008

    INDIANAPOLIS -- Indiana's agriculture director says this month's flooding likely caused the worst agriculture disaster in state history -- damaging nearly a tenth of corn and soybean crops and costing farmers upward of $800 million.

    "There's probably no sector of our state that's been hit harder than our farmers," Indiana Agriculture Director Andy Miller said Thursday. "Our farmers in the affected counties are suffering significantly."

    Preliminary estimates show about 9 percent of the state's corn and soybean crops were flooded, Miller said. Farmers are still trying to determine whether any of those crops can be saved. If those fields are a total loss, it could cost farmers more than $840 million, Miller said.

    Farmers are also dealing with damage to their homes and machinery. Some fields are littered with debris or covered by silt, while others are missing topsoil or large chunks of earth after being eroded by floodwaters.

    "When that soil leaves that field, it's gone," said Jane Hardisty of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service.

    Few livestock died in the floods, but farmers should be concerned about animal care as they start to recover, said Bret Marsh, the Indiana state veterinarian.

    Farmers should make sure animals have clean drinking water and feed, and should look for unusual behavior or other symptoms of illness. Marsh said farmers should watch for signs of bacteria, such as Anthrax, that can live in the soil for many years and then infect livestock after being disturbed.

    Many farmers cleaning up from the floods are wondering whether they can salvage any of their crops as commodity prices rise.

    "They know that every bushel is worth a lot of money and they want to save that if they possibly can," said Charles Hibberd, director of the Purdue University Cooperative Extension Service.

    Crops that simply got wet may survive, although development may be set back, Hibberd said. Fields submerged in the floods will likely not make it, he said, or could be damaged by pathogens in the dirty water. Replanting may be an option for some farmers, but it's unclear whether there is enough time left in the growing season to produce a crop, he said.

    The state Department of Agriculture is planning three forums next week discussing available aid and services such as loans, grants and land conservation programs.

    Agriculture officials urge farmers to contact them quickly to explore options for help. Thirty-seven counties are eligible for aid after being declared federal disaster areas.

    Miller said many farmers are so focused on their crops that they may not be worried yet about personal property damage -- which could lead to missed deadlines for aid applications.

    "It's vitally important that they reach out and understand that stuff now," he said.

    Copyright 2008 by The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.


    Offline gladius_veritatis

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    Serious food emergency!
    « Reply #5 on: June 20, 2008, 01:15:48 PM »
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  • Quote from: Alex
    So what are we supposed to do to prepare for this emergency? Are only those already slightly struggling supposed to prepare?


    The MAIN thing (temporally) is to GET FOOD.  If you have to "beg, borrow, or steal", do it.  Soon, it will be unavailable, even if you have the money to purchase it (which most will not).

    If you have no money, use credit.  I know most say, "Get out of debt", which is sound advice.  However, on this one the contrary may prove useful.  If you incur some debt to get food, no one will be bothering you.  The ENTIRE society is already awash in debt, and when this ship goes down, no one will be worrying about your debt or credit score.  Use the bankers' credit instruments to get what you need.  They created this whole mess, and they have been robbing us blind for years.  Now, they seek to starve/eliminate a good chunk of the world.  Use what you can, while you can - for soon there will be no more opportunity to get what you need.

    Yes, God will provide.  However, this does NOT mean that there are not many who will die of starvation within the next few years.  God speed.
    + Vincit veritas +

    Offline Vandaler

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    Serious food emergency!
    « Reply #6 on: June 20, 2008, 07:25:15 PM »
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  • Quote from: gladius_veritatis
    The MAIN thing (temporally) is to GET FOOD....


    Dude, we really need to go out and have a coffee together somehow to exchange on our world view. You almost worry me.

    Offline roscoe

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    Serious food emergency!
    « Reply #7 on: June 20, 2008, 09:01:30 PM »
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  • Somehow this situation conjures up images of the severe winter in 1788-89 France. The situation at that time was manipulated by Illuminati to set the Rev in motion.
    There Is No Such Thing As 'Sede Vacantism'...
    nor is there such thing as a 'Feeneyite' or 'Feeneyism'


    Offline gladius_veritatis

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    Serious food emergency!
    « Reply #8 on: June 20, 2008, 10:41:04 PM »
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  • Quote from: Vandaler
    Dude, we really need to go out and have a coffee together somehow to exchange on our world view. You almost worry me.


    I would love to have coffee with you, Van.  I am not surprised that such an idea strikes you as odd/incorrect/insane.  Many would say the same.  None, however, will think it odd when they cannot obtain food 2-6 months from now.  I do not care about being "right", but time will tell the truth of the matter.  God speed, my friend.
    + Vincit veritas +

    Offline Vandaler

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    Serious food emergency!
    « Reply #9 on: June 21, 2008, 05:16:26 AM »
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  • Quote from: gladius_veritatis
    I would love to have coffee with you, Van.  I am not surprised that such an idea strikes you as odd/incorrect/insane.  Many would say the same.  None, however, will think it odd when they cannot obtain food 2-6 months from now.  I do not care about being "right", but time will tell the truth of the matter.  God speed, my friend.


    Yes, time always does that.  But as much as I like being right, I think really in this case I'd be content if we mutually injected a dose of scepticism in our own point of views.  Perhaps I need to be a bit more concerned, and you perhaps to enjoy the sun and not be so alarmist.  

    You to, take care.  

     

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