Author Topic: Physical Recreation in MonasteriesSeminaries  (Read 1621 times)

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Offline Vladimir

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Physical Recreation in MonasteriesSeminaries
« on: February 08, 2012, 02:15:58 PM »
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  • On most traditional monasteries/seminaries websites there is information about obligatory physical recreation, usually coupled pictures of the monks or seminaries playing sports like soccer, basketbal, football, etc.

    1. Is this a truly traditional practice?

    2. If so, why isn't something more productive done, like martial arts (which could be useful to defend against thieves, or pillagers, etc - especially if the Sanctuary is in danger of being defiled)?

    Something along the lines of what the Buddhist Shaolin monks used to practice.




    Offline Matthew

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    « Reply #1 on: February 08, 2012, 02:27:30 PM »
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  • Interesting question.

    Especially certain martial arts (Aikido comes to mind) are defensive in nature, and not overly violent.

    In fact, Aikido takes a long time to learn, but you get better at it as you get older and weaker. You have to use more technique, less muscle.

    Aikido doesn't require that you either "let him go" or "push his nose into his brain and kill him". Such "military" martial arts would be useless for a peaceful Catholic.

    But Aikido gives you the choice about what you will "do" -- just show him what you could have done? Or drive his head into the brick wall as hard as you can? Or anything in between.
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    Offline Telesphorus

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    « Reply #2 on: February 08, 2012, 02:39:10 PM »
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  • Quote from: Vladimir
    On most traditional monasteries/seminaries websites there is information about obligatory physical recreation, usually coupled pictures of the monks or seminaries playing sports like soccer, basketbal, football, etc.


    It's safe to say it couldn't possibly be traditional.


    Offline Retablo

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    « Reply #3 on: February 08, 2012, 02:40:16 PM »
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  • Vladimir:

    Sports and other forms of recreation are neither traditional nor untraditional, in terms of seminary formation; they're entirely neutral. One may recreate in any legitimate way one elects to recreate, provided the seminary has no restrictions. For example, a seminary might decide that playing video games or watching television is verboten for a variety of reasons. But what would be objectionable about, say, soccer, or football, or hockey, or basketball, or any other competitive athletic sport?

    As far as martial arts, well, you need to have a qualified instructor for that, and I would imagine most seminaries haven't got someone like that on staff. On the other hand, everyone knows how to play baseball.

    Offline Catholic Samurai

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    « Reply #4 on: February 08, 2012, 02:46:32 PM »
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  • Quote from: Matthew
    Interesting question.

    Especially certain martial arts (Aikido comes to mind) are defensive in nature, and not overly violent.

    In fact, Aikido takes a long time to learn, but you get better at it as you get older and weaker. You have to use more technique, less muscle.

    Aikido doesn't require that you either "let him go" or "push his nose into his brain and kill him". Such "military" martial arts would be useless for a peaceful Catholic.

    But Aikido gives you the choice about what you will "do" -- just show him what you could have done? Or drive his head into the brick wall as hard as you can? Or anything in between.


    You probably don't realize it, but you're talking about Asian martial arts in general as opposed to Western "Marine" fighting. But I know you have a personal preference (bias lol) for Akido. There are many other styles that are just as good for that purpose since they all emphasize self control.

     
    "Louvada Siesa O' Sanctisimo Sacramento!"~warcry of the Amakusa/Shimabara rebels

    "We must risk something for God!"~Hernan Cortes


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    Offline Vladimir

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    « Reply #5 on: February 08, 2012, 02:49:36 PM »
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  • Quote from: Retablo
    Vladimir:

    Sports and other forms of recreation are neither traditional nor untraditional, in terms of seminary formation; they're entirely neutral. One may recreate in any legitimate way one elects to recreate, provided the seminary has no restrictions. For example, a seminary might decide that playing video games or watching television is verboten for a variety of reasons. But what would be objectionable about, say, soccer, or football, or hockey, or basketball, or any other competitive athletic sport?

    As far as martial arts, well, you need to have a qualified instructor for that, and I would imagine most seminaries haven't got someone like that on staff. On the other hand, everyone knows how to play baseball.


    Comptetitive sports may foster ill-feelings between people due to their competitive nature. Isn't it very worldly to strive to win at these games, etc?

    Some people are uncomfortable playing sports and may not even know how to play them.

    Practicing martial arts together fosters a sense of purpose and community.

    That is true that you need someone who knows the art (they wouldn't have to be certified I don't think, although they probably would be anyhow) which is probably the biggest drawback. Didn't the Winona seminary hire some early music specialist to teach the seminarians about music though? I guess recreation isn't as important.

    Thanks for that blurb about Aikido! Never heard of it before, but it looks very interesting...



    Offline Catholic Samurai

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    « Reply #6 on: February 08, 2012, 03:03:40 PM »
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  • Quote from: Vladimir


    Comptetitive sports may foster ill-feelings between people due to their competitive nature. Isn't it very worldly to strive to win at these games, etc?

    Some people are uncomfortable playing sports and may not even know how to play them.

    Practicing martial arts together fosters a sense of purpose and community.

    ....

    Thanks for that blurb about Aikido! Never heard of it before, but it looks very interesting...


    If your gonna actually practice martial arts at all then you're gonna have to have all the practitioners engage in hand to hand fighting, otherwise it really isn't "practice". So it's not going to matter... someone's feelings are gonna get hurt because they lost or got beat up or whatever... big deal! It'll be great for health and humility!


    You know Vlad, Fr.Thrihn would tell you to take Taekwondo or Karate if you asked him.

    *Don't know if I misspelled is name or not. Sorry.
    "Louvada Siesa O' Sanctisimo Sacramento!"~warcry of the Amakusa/Shimabara rebels

    "We must risk something for God!"~Hernan Cortes


    TEJANO AND PROUD!

    Offline Retablo

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    « Reply #7 on: February 08, 2012, 03:15:34 PM »
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  • Vladimir:

    "Comptetitive sports may foster ill-feelings between people due to their competitive nature..."

    No more so than grades given by professors. How would you account for ill-feelings that might arise between seminarians because some are smarter than others? The fault is with the offended person, not with the activity of testing and scoring.  Same with competitive sports.  

    "Isn't it very worldly to strive to win at these games, etc?"

    No.


    Offline MaterDominici

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    « Reply #8 on: February 08, 2012, 03:33:27 PM »
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  • Quote from: Vladimir
    Some people are uncomfortable playing sports and may not even know how to play them.


    I doubt a seminary/monastery would make any particular activity mandatory. It would likely be physical activity in general that would be mandatory, so the individual would be free to choose from whatever the possibilities.
    "If I could only make the faithful sing the Kyrie, the Gloria, the Credo, the Sanctus and the Agnus Dei ... that would be to me the finest triumph sacred music could have, for it is in really taking part in the liturgy that the faithful will preserve their devotion. I would take the Tantum ...

    Offline s2srea

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    « Reply #9 on: February 08, 2012, 04:09:38 PM »
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  • Quote from: Matthew
    Interesting question.

    Especially certain martial arts (Aikido comes to mind) are defensive in nature, and not overly violent.

    In fact, Aikido takes a long time to learn, but you get better at it as you get older and weaker. You have to use more technique, less muscle.

    Aikido doesn't require that you either "let him go" or "push his nose into his brain and kill him". Such "military" martial arts would be useless for a peaceful Catholic.

    But Aikido gives you the choice about what you will "do" -- just show him what you could have done? Or drive his head into the brick wall as hard as you can? Or anything in between.



    My wife's aunt and uncle are both Akido sense's and have their own studio. Unfortunately, they live about 3 hours away, and it would be impossible for me to attend any classes with them on a regular basis.

    Offline Sigismund

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    « Reply #10 on: February 08, 2012, 08:23:29 PM »
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  • Quote from: Telesphorus
    Quote from: Vladimir
    On most traditional monasteries/seminaries websites there is information about obligatory physical recreation, usually coupled pictures of the monks or seminaries playing sports like soccer, basketbal, football, etc.


    It's safe to say it couldn't possibly be traditional.



    What couldn't be traditional?
    Stir up within Thy Church, we beseech Thee, O Lord, the Spirit with which blessed Josaphat, Thy Martyr and Bishop, was filled, when he laid down his life for his sheep: so that, through his intercession, we too may be moved and strengthen by the same Spir


    Offline Sigismund

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    « Reply #11 on: February 08, 2012, 08:25:47 PM »
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  • I think this is a great idea.  I am also having fun imagining my son and his fellow seminary classmates as Aikido masters.

     :smile:
    Stir up within Thy Church, we beseech Thee, O Lord, the Spirit with which blessed Josaphat, Thy Martyr and Bishop, was filled, when he laid down his life for his sheep: so that, through his intercession, we too may be moved and strengthen by the same Spir

    Offline Vladimir

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    « Reply #12 on: February 11, 2012, 07:31:37 PM »
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  • to highlight a need for this, there is a Redemporist monastery in Houston that needed to obtain a few large watchdogs because blacks from the surrounding ghetto would walk in and take the money donation boxes right in front of the priests.




    Offline Lybus

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    « Reply #13 on: February 11, 2012, 09:33:36 PM »
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  • Quote from: Vladimir
    On most traditional monasteries/seminaries websites there is information about obligatory physical recreation, usually coupled pictures of the monks or seminaries playing sports like soccer, basketbal, football, etc.

    1. Is this a truly traditional practice?

    2. If so, why isn't something more productive done, like martial arts (which could be useful to defend against thieves, or pillagers, etc - especially if the Sanctuary is in danger of being defiled)?

    Something along the lines of what the Buddhist Shaolin monks used to practice.



    1. Think of medieval festivals; there were many competitions I"m sure and I bet even the seminarians were allowed to get out and have some fun every now and then.

    2. Recreational activities were not supposed to be productive, but done for their own sake; to relax and ease the mind. Sometimes sitting back and smelling the roses gives you time to really appreciate all that God has given you. Besides, Team sports (like football) are great at developing community because it directs several people towards a common goal, where each person must lay aside their own ego and do whatever they can to support the team. You develop intimacy and companionship with you teammates and you grow to become more satisfied with the team's success than with your own.

    In regards to being a responsible man, would it be interesting to learn, after six years of accumulating all the wisdom you could, that you had it right all alon

    Offline alaric

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    « Reply #14 on: February 12, 2012, 06:57:17 AM »
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  • Whatever happened to the "warrior-monk" like the Templars?


     

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