Author Topic: Persecution in Iraq  (Read 1047 times)

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Offline SerpKerp

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Persecution in Iraq
« on: August 13, 2014, 04:18:59 PM »
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  • Are the Eastern Catholics being persecuted in Iraq and Syria, Traditional enough to be Martyrs for the One True Faith?

    Offline JezusDeKoning

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    Persecution in Iraq
    « Reply #1 on: August 13, 2014, 04:27:38 PM »
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  • Quote from: SerpKerp
    Are the Eastern Catholics being persecuted in Iraq and Syria, Traditional enough to be Martyrs for the One True Faith?


    If we're talking Iraq and Syria, then they'd more than likely be Assyrian/Chaldean Catholics. Eastern Catholics haven't, barring the Maronites, adopted the insidious Latinizations that Rome did. This makes them still holy and Catholic rites - the people, too. They more than likely are not embracing today's sordid Modernism.
    Tío Samuel, ven pa 'aca


    Offline glaston

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    Persecution in Iraq
    « Reply #2 on: August 13, 2014, 08:02:10 PM »
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    ANTIOCH, IN SYRIA

    an'-ti-ok, (Antiocheia).

    (2) Antioch in Syria.--In 301 BC, shortly after the battle of Ipsus, which made him master of Syria, Seleucus Nicator rounded the city of Antioch, naming it after his father Antiochus. Guided, it was said, by the flight of an eagle, he fixed its site on the left bank of the Orontes (the El-`Asi) about 15 miles from the sea. He also rounded and fortified Seleucia to be the port of his new capital.

    The city was enlarged and embellished by successive kings of the Seleucid Dynasty, notably by Seleucus Callinicus (246-226 BC), and Antiochus Epiphanes (175-164 BC). In 83 BC, on the collapse of the Seleucid monarchy, Antioch fell into the hands of Tigranes, king of Armenia, who held Syria until his defeat by the Romans fourteen years later. In 64 BC the country was definitely annexed to Rome by Pompey, who granted considerable privileges to Antioch, which now became the capital of the Roman province of Syria. In the civil wars which terminated in the establishment of the Roman principate, Antioch succeeded in attaching itself constantly to the winning side, declaring for Caesar after the fall of Pompey, and for Augustus after the battle of Actium. A Roman element was added to its population, and several of the emperors contributed to its adornment. Already a splendid city under the Seleucids, Antioch was made still more splendid by its Roman patrons and masters. It was the "queen of the East," the third city, after Rome and Alexandria, of the Roman world. About five miles distant from the city was the suburb of Daphne, a spot sacred to Apollo and Artemis.

    This suburb, beautified by groves and fountains, and embellished by the Seleucids and the Romans with temples and baths, was the pleasure resort of the city, and "Daphnic morals" became a by-word. From its foundation Antioch was a cosmopolitan city. Though not a seaport, its situation was favorable to commercial development, and it absorbed much of the trade of the Levant. Seleucus Nicator had settled numbers of Jews in it, granting them equal rights with the Greeks (Ant., XII, iii, 1). Syrians, Greeks, Jews, and in later days, Romans, constituted the main elements of the population. The citizens were a vigorous, turbulent and pushing race, notorious for their commercial aptitude, the licentiousness of their pleasures, and the scurrility of their wit. Literature and the arts, however, were not neglected.

    In the early history of Christianity, Antioch occupies a distinguished place. The large and flourishing Jewish colony offered an immediate field for Christian teaching, and the cosmopolitanism of the city tended to widen the outlook of the Christian community, which refused to be confined within the narrow limits of Judaism. Nicolas, a proselyte of Antioch, was one of the first deacons (Acts 6:5). Antioch was the cradle of Gentile Christianity and of Christian missionary enterprise. It was at the instance of the church at Antioch that the council at Jerusalem decided to relieve Gentile Christians of the burden of the Jewish law (Acts 15). Antioch was Paul's starting-point in his three missionary journeys (Acts 13:1; 15:36; 18:23), and thither he returned from the first two as to his headquarters (Acts 14:26; 18:22). Here also the term "Christian," doubtless originally a nickname, was first applied to the followers of Jesus (Acts 11:26). The honorable record of the church at Antioch as the mother- church of Gentile Christianity gave her a preeminence which she long enjoyed. The most distinguished of her later sons was John Chrysostom. The city suffered severely from earthquakes, but did not lose its importance until the Arab conquest restored Damascus to the first place among Syrian cities. Antioch still bears its ancient name (Antakiyeh), but is now a poor town with a few thousand inhabitants.

    C. H. Thomson


    That's why the Talmud-Satanist Mongol Faux Jew has kicked off trouble and attrocities in the country esp Christian Targets!

    Online poche

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    Persecution in Iraq
    « Reply #3 on: August 13, 2014, 10:32:17 PM »
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  • The Eastern Rite Catholics have shoen that they are willing to give up everything that they have on this earth in order to not profess belief in a false religion.  

    Offline Ladislaus

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    « Reply #4 on: August 14, 2014, 08:40:11 AM »
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  • In my experience, it really varies.  Many of them are cultural Catholics and don't believe in much of anything.  Many clearly have a core supernatural Faith in the Church dogmas.  Some of them are anti-Roman and don't really believe in the Papal Primacy and the dogmas surrounding the papacy but think more like Eastern Orthodox.  All but a few have embraced Ecumenical thinking whereby they feel more kinship with their schismatic equivalents than with Western Catholics.  There are some who are very devout.  So it all depends ... just as it does anywhere else and always has been.  Rest assured that God will sort it all out.  I'm sure that there are some genuine martyrs among them, and yet I imagine that others are just victims.  God alone knows.


    Offline IllyricumSacrum

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    Persecution in Iraq
    « Reply #5 on: August 14, 2014, 02:37:29 PM »
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  • Quote from: JezusDeKoning
    Quote from: SerpKerp
    Are the Eastern Catholics being persecuted in Iraq and Syria, Traditional enough to be Martyrs for the One True Faith?


    If we're talking Iraq and Syria, then they'd more than likely be Assyrian/Chaldean Catholics. Eastern Catholics haven't, barring the Maronites, adopted the insidious Latinizations that Rome did. This makes them still holy and Catholic rites - the people, too. They more than likely are not embracing today's sordid Modernism.


    As an Eastern Catholics I can tell you that it is the de-latinizers (read: de-Catholicizers) that are the ones most infected with Modernism and Ecumania. Much more so among the Melkites than the Syrians, Assyro-Chaldeans or the Armenians. Its even spreading to the Ruthenians.

    Offline BTNYC

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    Persecution in Iraq
    « Reply #6 on: August 14, 2014, 05:18:49 PM »
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  • I've been to Divine Liturgies in Ukrainian, Melkite, Maronite and Coptic Catholic churches. From my experience, the Ukrainians and the Copts were the most traditional while the Melkites and (especially) the Maronites were the least (with such horrors as altar girls, lectresses and Mass versus populum being prominently in evidence among the latter).

    I have no personal experience with Chaldeans, but I was greatly disheartened by these videos:

    [youtube]https://www.youtube.com/embed/Z_jWGzPzga4[/youtube]

    [youtube]https://www.youtube.com/embed/INouqp4uaKQ[/youtube]

    Offline SerpKerp

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    « Reply #7 on: August 14, 2014, 07:28:56 PM »
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  • This is so Confusing


    Offline SerpKerp

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    Persecution in Iraq
    « Reply #8 on: August 14, 2014, 07:30:38 PM »
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  • The thing about the Crisis is you really can't point to who is objectively Catholic and not Catholic.
    Its just a big hunk of Grey to me.

    For instance I lean Sedevacantist. So my Catholic meter is that the SSPX is Catholic (Obviously) while accepting a False Pope, and that the mainstream Novus Ordo/Liberal Novus Ordo is a Protestant Sect.

    But when it comes to the Eastern Catholics, Indult groups, and Conservative Novus Ordo (By Conservative Novus Ordo I mean those with a Very Strict reading of Vatican II who often go to the Novus Ordo begrudgingly) I couldn't tell you.

    Im also wondering what others think too.  

    Offline JezusDeKoning

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    « Reply #9 on: August 14, 2014, 10:24:18 PM »
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  • Maronites are wonky because of their status as what is essentially the Church's millennia-old arm in the Levant. The others (Romanian-Greek, Ukrainian, Assyrian, etc.) didn't ever have this because they were, especially in Europe, Eastern Orthodox communities that kept their style of worship but accepted the Primacy of Peter and converted.

    Tío Samuel, ven pa 'aca

    Online poche

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    Persecution in Iraq
    « Reply #10 on: August 14, 2014, 10:32:46 PM »
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  • Quote from: SerpKerp
    The thing about the Crisis is you really can't point to who is objectively Catholic and not Catholic.
    Its just a big hunk of Grey to me.

    For instance I lean Sedevacantist. So my Catholic meter is that the SSPX is Catholic (Obviously) while accepting a False Pope, and that the mainstream Novus Ordo/Liberal Novus Ordo is a Protestant Sect.

    But when it comes to the Eastern Catholics, Indult groups, and Conservative Novus Ordo (By Conservative Novus Ordo I mean those with a Very Strict reading of Vatican II who often go to the Novus Ordo begrudgingly) I couldn't tell you.

    Im also wondering what others think too.  

    With respect to the Iraqi Christians look at the evidence. When given the choice a few took the easy way and at least said with the lips what they had to say in order to not disrupt their lives. The vast majority chose to give up everything they had literally. Today many of them are camped out under their stars. Where their next meal will come from is a mystery. Their witness speaks louder than anything I could ever say. I only hope that I will be as faithful when the day of my tribulation comes.


    Online poche

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    « Reply #11 on: August 15, 2014, 03:11:51 AM »
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  • Christians who have fled their homes in the wake of the advance of the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant are dying of hunger, thirst, and disease in refugee camps, the Catholic Herald reported.

    Outside the camps, “the Christians are homeless. There are no places for them — (they are) only sitting in the churches, parks, streets, in this heat of sun,” said Sahar Mansour, who taught chemistry at the University of Mosul before the Islamic State invaded the city.

    “A lot of people are sick: elderly, infants and pregnant women sitting under the sun, and they cannot catch their breath,” she added. “People are dying because of the shortage of medicine, water and food.”


    http://www.catholicculture.org/news/headlines/index.cfm?storyid=22293

    All this pain and agony could have been avoided if these Christians had been willing to accept the false "religion of peace." Their suffering and death is because they choose to be Catholic.

     

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