Author Topic: Paganism Alive and Well  (Read 941 times)

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Offline sspxbvm

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Paganism Alive and Well
« on: March 02, 2013, 10:36:50 PM »
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  •  PAGANISM


    Offline Alex117

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    « Reply #1 on: March 02, 2013, 11:00:42 PM »
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  • All worship the great, benevolent Easter Bunny - may his whiskers be long and his ears be straight.


    Offline Pelly

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    « Reply #2 on: March 03, 2013, 11:52:39 AM »
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  • This is very commonplace. Christmas and Easter being commercialized highly... and Jesus was never mentioned. Instead, they bring the bunnies, the chicks, Santa Claus in.

    Offline Neil Obstat

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    « Reply #3 on: March 03, 2013, 10:56:15 PM »
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  • It kind of gets me when Catholics have "Easter egg hunts" and all the
    children go out and compete with each other to grab the most eggs.
    All it does is teach greed and addiction to sugar.  The one puts you
    in hell and the other gives you rotten teeth and diabetes.  

    I know adults who are stuck in the Easter-egg-hunt attitude of daily life.

    The resurrection of Our Lord has nothing to do with an Easter basket
    and chocolate covered candies.

    My mother used to bake a special Easter lamb cake that she used a
    special baking pan for.  That pan got put away every year, and did
    not come out again until it was the Triduum again next year.  These
    traditions are passed on through the mothers of families.  When it's up
    to the fathers to keep them alive they tend to die, because women
    find reasons to be resentful of men when that happens, and men don't
    find the same joy in the traditions that they do when the women take on
    their roles properly with the children.  

    She used a unique recipe for the cake that made the little lamb a very
    special treat.  That recipe was never used for any other cake in the
    whole year, only for the Easter lamb.  And I recall her telling about how
    the pan was given to her from one of her relatives.  It was probably
    100 years old in the 1960's.  But now, you know how anything "old" is
    generally disregarded as useless, that is, unless it's a deed to real
    estate or some old stock certificates, or numismatic coins.  Then they
    have market value, you see.  It's the Easter-egg-complex, again.  

    The lamb sat upright on the platter, with a floral garnish all around him.
    And he was reserved for Easter dinner dessert.  Along with the placing
    of the Paschal Lamb on the table came the reading of a story that was
    similar to a Bible story, but I did not ask for nor keep a copy of that,
    either.  I get the feeling that I was the only one who appreciated her
    efforts in this regard.  But I did not really learn very well, because I
    cannot duplicate it.

    It had an ivory color and a sweet, dense vanilla flavor.  It smelled
    delicious.  Sometimes it had a coconut frosting all over that kind of
    looked like wool.  I made the serious mistake of never asking her for
    the recipe.  So I bear the sin of dropping the age-old family tradition.  
    And all I can do is tell my descendants about it.  We'll see how that
    goes, I suppose.  



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    Offline ServusSpiritusSancti

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    « Reply #4 on: March 03, 2013, 11:11:34 PM »
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  • Protestants are guilty of falling for the secularization of Christmas and Easter. They buy into all of it.

    I've heard of Protestants who begin having Easter celebrations on Good Friday. It's ridiculous.

    It's sad how Christmas and Easter have been so secularized.


    Offline Caviezel Fan

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    « Reply #5 on: March 04, 2013, 03:44:58 PM »
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  • "Easter" will always be "Resurrection Day" to me.  It's such a shame that the true importance of this day is lost in all of the secular celebrations, like bunnies, egg hunts, etc.  Maybe Easter should be officially named Resurrection Day, because that is what it is!

    Offline AlligatorDicax

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    « Reply #6 on: March 04, 2013, 05:26:42 PM »
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  • Quote from: Neil Obstat (Mar 3, 2013, 11:56 pm)
    My mother used to bake a special Easter lamb cake that she used a special baking pan for. That pan got put away every year, and did not come out again until it was the Triduum again next year. [....]  And I recall her telling about how the pan was given to her from one of her relatives.  It was probably 100 years old in the 1960's.

    That makes me think it was less a "baking pan" than a metal mold, like the cast-iron corn-cob-shaped corn-bread/fritters baking molds that've remained popular enough to seem to've remained in 'new' production.  Or the molds used mostly as forms for chilled dips, Jello, and certain other kinds of foods (that I just don't know enough about to describe).

    Quote from: Neil Obstat (continued, 11:56 pm)
    The lamb sat upright on the platter, with a floral garnish all around him.

    "Sat" literally meaning seated on its hindquarters, but with erect forelegs?  Or "upright" in the sense of standing on all 4 legs, perhaps with sculptor's tricks for structural support, designed to be hidden by the garnish?  Or "upright" in the sense of merely being served perpendicularly to the baking platter, instead of being a horizontal cut-out shape that remains parallel to the baking pan: a baker's analogue to a sculptor's lapidary bas-relief image?

    Quote from: Neil Obstat (concluded, 11:56 pm)
    She used a unique recipe for the cake that made the little lamb a very special treat.  That recipe was never used for any other cake in the whole year, only for the Easter lamb. [....]  It had an ivory color and a sweet, dense vanilla flavor.  It smelled delicious. Sometimes it had a coconut frosting all over that kind of looked like wool.  I made the serious mistake of never asking her for the recipe. [....] So I bear the sin of dropping the age-old family tradition.  And all I can do is tell my descendants about it.

    I get the impression that you have no siblings or surviving aunts or uncles who could help reconstruct it.

    Even if you're on your own, for now, you could contribute to some family-history triage: Look for old photos that show it.  Sketch it yourself from memory, or if relatively ungifted as an artist, describe it to a relative who has that gift, and hang over her|his shoulder until you think it looks about right.  But either way, no matter how habitually frugal you are, do not use scrap paper for such a sketch, which could create a mistaken impression, especially in a cavalier compulsive cleaner, that it's not worth keeping. At least the sketch could be passed down until a younger family member decides to take up the challenge of reconstruction.

    Your mention of coconut brought back the image of an Easter-Bunny cake in my family, with pink-paper ears.  But more relevant to you: A meringue-pie-like icing, sprinkled with shredded coconut.  And a pink jelly bean for its nose.  Meringue fits because vanilla is commonly used to enhance its sugar-intensive flavor.

    Fascinating: I hadn't though about that cake for many years.

    Perhaps you already had comparable ideas years ago.  It's likely that a lot of CathInfo members know a lot more about baking than I do.

    Offline MrsZ

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    « Reply #7 on: March 04, 2013, 06:21:30 PM »
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  • Just a note about the Easter Lamb Cake.  I looked on Pinterest under those search terms and a whole bunch of photos and recipes came up. I don't think it will be that difficult to look at the images and descriptions to find the one closest to the one your remember your mother making.  Maybe Google images to start.  Hope this helps.


    Offline Marlelar

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    « Reply #8 on: March 04, 2013, 06:33:08 PM »
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  • Wilton makes a pan for a stand-up Easter lamb.

    Lamb pan

    Offline Neil Obstat

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    « Reply #9 on: March 05, 2013, 03:56:26 AM »
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  • Quote from: Marlelar
    Wilton makes a pan for a stand-up Easter lamb.

    Lamb pan







    This is sort of how it looked.  When I say sat upright, I mean lying down but
    its head was upright, like this picture.  The legs were not standing.  The lamb
    I recall we had seemed bigger than this one, but maybe that's my imagination.
    It was 50 years ago.  The pan was really a mold, as shown, and I think it was
    aluminum too, and this two part description seems to be right.  I recall there
    was a delicate process to remove the mold at just the right time, and then
    one of the tasks was trimming off the seam line that went over the back.  I
    was allowed to help with that job the last few years that we had the lamb,
    but I don't remember why we stopped it.  Something happened.  And I do
    not recall ever telling my mother that I appreciate this memory.  Now it's
    too late for that.  


    As I recall our lamb had a more prominent snout, but who knows?




    Anyone making plans for Easter a.k.a. Resurrection Sunday Dinner may
    enjoy the time to order this pan from Wilton and give it a shot.  

    I don't think you will be disappointed.  They must include some kind of
    recipe with the pan.  This is weird.  In my mind I can imagine the aroma
    of this cake from 50 years ago!  The whole house was filled with it, and
    that came to be synonymous with Easter.  That and the ham baked with
    clove flowerettes stuck all over it every two inches.  



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