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Traditional Catholic Faith => General Discussion => Topic started by: Matto on August 07, 2019, 10:41:22 PM

Title: On Squirrels
Post by: Matto on August 07, 2019, 10:41:22 PM
This is an old thought I had that makes sense to me now:

"Here is a strange thing I noticed about squirrels and the kinds of squirrels that live in different places. In most places that I have been to, the squirrels are the normal grey (or red) kind and they run around finding nuts and climbing trees like regular squirrels do. But then there is a different kind of squirrel that lives in the places where evil reigns. There is a neighborhood I know that is seeped in sin and in this neighborhood the squirrels are not grey (or red). It is as if the normal squirrels have been chased out by a horror of sin and have been replaced by ugly squirrels who are black and slothful and sit around on the ground and have much less energy than the normal squirrels as if they are sick and tired of the world. In places where grace abounds, there is another kind of squirrel I have noticed. These are wonderful squirrels and are snow-white in color and very beautiful. They are very fast and never stop moving. When they climb the trees and jump from branch to branch it is a marvel to look at them as it looks as if they are flying. The difference between these kinds of squirrels is like the difference between saints, and normal sinners, and the unrepentantly wicked. I wonder if God sends these different kinds of squirrels to be among different kinds of people as a reminder of the state of their souls. (My grandmother had these snow-white squirrels in her backyard. That is a hopeful sign)."

After I first thought of it years ago I thought I was mad.
Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: Nadir on August 08, 2019, 12:04:53 AM
It is like that with dogs, not so much the appearance, but the behaviour. If the owner is changed, the nature of the dog is changed.

Once there was a neighbouring dog, and the owners sold the property together with the dog.

Jay Jay had a reputation for being very fierce, and none of the neighbours would go there without fear. 

The new owners came and, lo and behold, Jay Jay, a German shepherd became, well not quite a lamb but approachable. One day I watched him gently edging between a small child and the edge of a pool. He watched continuously like a hawk, and repeated the action as needed.
Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: 1st Mansion Tenant on August 08, 2019, 12:22:04 AM
Thanks, Matto. It's a relief to know I'm not the only one who ponders stuff like that.   
Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: Seraphina on August 08, 2019, 01:38:38 AM
If the three of you are strange, I’m probably stranger.  🕷🕸🦟

On an Ignatian Retreat in Ridgefield, CT, July of 2005, I discovered a friendly and intelligent Brown house spider, a female who made her silken home in the overhead light at the top of the stairs to the chapel.  On the first night I couldn’t sleep and decided to get a breath of fresh air outside.  Upon re-entering, I saw movement in the lamp cover through a place where it was cracked and broken off. I named her Claudette.  She was busy wrapping up a small moth, all the while staring at me, probably wondering what kind of spider I was, having only two eyes.  Every night for the entire retreat, I captured an insect and fed it to Claudette.  Mostly I half killed moths or mosquitoes that swarmed around the outside light at night.  By the last day of the retreat, Claudette was very plump, indeed.  I don’t know if she made an egg sac.  I never saw a husband, but that’s not unusual because spiders often capture and eat their husbands if they don’t run fast enough after performing their duty.  If Claudette did have spiderlings in the lamp, approximately 800 little ones were released in the building.  Her descendants may very well live there to this day.

“The spider taketh hold with her hands, and is in kings’ palaces.”  ~Proverbs xxx; xxviii
Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: Matto on August 08, 2019, 06:21:34 AM
My intuition tells me that moths are symbols of dead souls and butterflies are symbols of living souls, so whenever a spider is eating a moth it is a sign of salvation, and if you ever see a spider eating a butterfly, it would be time to repent (or perhaps time for a crusade)!

A Children's Crusade: Fairy tales and songs and stories are true. We teach them to children so that they will find their way home when they are lost. IF they were baptized but lived with bad parents who never taught them how to be good, they will get lost in the woods, with only their guardian angels to help them. We have to drop them bread crumbs so that they may find their way home.

One thing Jordan Peterson is right about is that a young man has got to go into the belly of the whale (like Jonah) to save his father and only after he conquers his fears will he become a real boy (by the intercession of the Blue Fairy). We men do have to kill our dragons, and always fear the horn of the unicorn, may you never be gored by him. There is a reason the biography of Archbishop Lefebvre by DR. David Allen White is titled Horn of the Unicorn. DAW's book (https://angeluspress.org/products/horn-of-the-unicorn).

Hansel and Gretel is first, then Sleeping Beauty? And Pinocchio. Cinderella and Beauty and the Beast, The Little Mermaid, and of course Little Red Riding Hood. My muse has a tattoo of Little Red Riding Hood on her body.

Everything that exists is true and good, and all the rest are imaginary numbers.
Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: Kazimierz on August 08, 2019, 10:24:01 AM
This thread brings to mind the land of faerie, that perilous realm. How we can marvel at nature and all its critters as all deeply imbued with signs of His handiwork.

I am wary of willow trees, esp very old ones. ;)
Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: Matto on August 08, 2019, 11:17:36 AM
I am far too credulous. That is one of my weaknesses. It is like I do not want to believe that people would tell lies (or be in error because of sin). I am not as wise as a serpent. I laugh when people talk about pee. You all know why . . . don't you?

The Lord of the Rings is truly a masterpiece. "The Ring, the Ring, My Conscience for the Ring." = [(Richard III) + (Richard II) + (The Lord of the Rings)] / 3

Is that right? I am just musing. Telling jokes. When I was in kindergarten my teacher told me I was "a math magician".
Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: Meg on August 08, 2019, 03:32:09 PM
A most interesting thread. As long as we're telling animal stories, I have one to offer, though it's not quite in the same vein as the O.P.

My husband likes to feed the crows that inhabit our neighborhood. I'm not a fan of crows, since they seem to keep other birds away. I call them his "crow buddies."
The crows will sometimes caw in the morning (a most unpleasant sound) in hopes that my husband will give them something - usually food that's stale, like old bread, crackers, etc. Well, about six weeks ago, a crow dropped something on the ground, which fell right next to where my husband was standing in the backyard. It was a cherry, and it was unblemished. My husband got the impression that the crow gave him a little gift, as payback for the food that he gives them. Maybe that's not what it was. But then crows are quite intelligent.
Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: forlorn on August 08, 2019, 04:41:37 PM
A most interesting thread. As long as we're telling animal stories, I have one to offer, though it's not quite in the same vein as the O.P.

My husband likes to feed the crows that inhabit our neighborhood. I'm not a fan of crows, since they seem to keep other birds away. I call them his "crow buddies."
The crows will sometimes caw in the morning (a most unpleasant sound) in hopes that my husband will give them something - usually food that's stale, like old bread, crackers, etc. Well, about six weeks ago, a crow dropped something on the ground, which fell right next to where my husband was standing in the backyard. It was a cherry, and it was unblemished. My husband got the impression that the crow gave him a little gift, as payback for the food that he gives them. Maybe that's not what it was. But then crows are quite intelligent.
I've heard that crows actually do remember human faces, and I've heard many similar stories. So I wouldn't doubt it. 
Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: Kazimierz on August 08, 2019, 06:18:06 PM
"Trouble follows you like crows...." ;) ;)

I have a general disdain for magpies. Far more irritating noiseboxes they are, no to mention another species that drives songbirds away. And molest people's cats. 

If a pair decide try to nest next year in the backwards trees, they will be terminated with extreme pride and prejudice.

Thankfully we do have lots of jackrabbits, who sleep on front lawns. We ponder on how early or late they start to change their coats, reflecting the upcoming season.
We had three very bigguns that hung around our yard last winter. I ended up naming them Gaspar, Melchior and Balthasar. :D

Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: Nadir on August 08, 2019, 07:46:26 PM
In the Murrinhpatha language, crows don't say caw, they say wark, which incidentally is also their onomatapoeiaic name. 

Which brings to mind a spider I once had dealings with.

One day 25 - 30 years ago I heard this strange noise a little like a crow but not quite. So I said to my kids " go outside and see what kind of a bird that is. " Durifully they went out and came back saying, Mum, that's not a bird it's a spider.

Don't be silly, I told them. Now go back and find out what type of bird that is. The same answer, "Mum, it's a spider. Come and have a look."

Out I went and there sitting on the post was a large bird eating spider, otherwise known as the barking spider or Selenocosmia Crassines. As he vocalised his whole body shook and vibrated. 

Life is full of delightful surprises. They say he make a barking sound to scare away predators but my theory is that he does it to attract prey. 
Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: Pax Vobis on August 08, 2019, 08:57:46 PM

Quote
Don't be silly, I told them. Now go back and find out what type of bird that is. The same answer, "Mum, it's a spider. Come and have a look."

Out I went and there sitting on the post was a large bird eating spider, otherwise known as the barking spider or Selenocosmia Crassines.
You must be from Aussie land.  Thank goodness we don't have such large spiders here in "the states".  I hate spiders.
Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: Pax Vobis on August 08, 2019, 09:02:00 PM

Quote
My husband likes to feed the crows that inhabit our neighborhood. I'm not a fan of crows, since they seem to keep other birds away. I call them his "crow buddies." 
The crows will sometimes caw in the morning (a most unpleasant sound) in hopes that my husband will give them something - usually food that's stale, like old bread, crackers, etc. Well, about six weeks ago, a crow dropped something on the ground, which fell right next to where my husband was standing in the backyard. It was a cherry, and it was unblemished. My husband got the impression that the crow gave him a little gift, as payback for the food that he gives them. Maybe that's not what it was. But then crows are quite intelligent.
https://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-31604026 (https://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-31604026)

The girl who gets gifts from birds
.
Lots of people love the birds in their garden, but it's rare for that affection to be reciprocated. One young girl in Seattle is luckier than most. She feeds the crows in her garden - and they bring her gifts in return.
.
Eight-year-old Gabi Mann sets a bead storage container on the dining room table, and clicks the lid open. This is her most precious collection.
.
"You may take a few close looks," she says, "but don't touch." It's a warning she's most likely practised on her younger brother. She laughs after saying it though. She is happy for the audience.
.
Inside the box are rows of small objects in clear plastic bags. One label reads: "Black table by feeder. 2:30 p.m. 09 Nov 2014." Inside is a broken light bulb. Another bag contains small pieces of brown glass worn smooth by the sea. "Beer coloured glass," as Gabi describes it.
.
Each item is individually wrapped and categorised. Gabi pulls a black zip out of a labelled bag and holds it up. "We keep it in as good condition as we can," she says, before explaining this object is one of her favourites.
.
There's a miniature silver ball, a black button, a blue paper clip, a yellow bead, a faded black piece of foam, a blue Lego piece, and the list goes on. Many of them are scuffed and dirty. It is an odd assortment of objects for a little girl to treasure, but to Gabi these things are more valuable than gold.
.
She didn't gather this collection. Each item was a gift - given to her by crows.
.
She holds up a pearl coloured heart. It is her most-prized present. "It's showing me how much they love me."
.
Gabi's relationship with the neighbourhood crows began accidentally in 2011. She was four years old, and prone to dropping food. She'd get out of the car, and a chicken nugget would tumble off her lap. A crow would rush in to recover it. Soon, the crows were watching for her, hoping for another bite.
.
As she got older, she rewarded their attention, by sharing her packed lunch on the way to the bus stop. Her brother joined in. Soon, crows were lining up in the afternoon to greet Gabi's bus, hoping for another feeding session.
.
Gabi's mother Lisa didn't mind that crows consumed most of the school lunches she packed. "I like that they love the animals and are willing to share," she says, while admitting she never noticed crows until her daughter took an interest in them. "It was a kind of transformation. I never thought about birds."
.
In 2013, Gabi and Lisa started offering food as a daily ritual, rather than dropping scraps from time to time.
.
Each morning, they fill the backyard birdbath with fresh water and cover bird-feeder platforms with peanuts. Gabi throws handfuls of dog food into the grass. As they work, crows assemble on the telephone lines, calling loudly to them.
.
It was after they adopted this routine that the gifts started appearing.
.
The crows would clear the feeder of peanuts, and leave shiny trinkets on the empty tray; an earring, a hinge, a polished rock. There wasn't a pattern. Gifts showed up sporadically - anything shiny and small enough to fit in a crow's mouth.
.
One time it was a tiny piece of metal with the word "best" printed on it. "I don't know if they still have the part that says 'friend'," Gabi laughs, amused by the thought of a crow wearing a matching necklace.
.
When you see Gabi's collection, it's hard not to wish for gift-giving crows of your own.
.
"If you want to form a bond with a crow, be consistent in rewarding them," advises John Marzluff, professor of wildlife science at the University of Washington. He specialises in birds, particularly crows and ravens.
.
What food is best? "A few peanuts in the shell," he says. "It's a high-energy food… and it makes noise when you throw it on the ground, so they hear it and they quickly habituate to your routine."
.
Marzluff, and his colleague Mark Miller, did a study of crows and the people who feed them. They found that crows and people form a very personal relationship. "There's definitely a two-way communication going on there," Marzluff says. "They understand each other's signals."
.
The birds communicate by how they fly, how close they walk, and where they sit. The human learns their language and the crows learn their feeder's patterns and posture. They start to know and trust each other. Sometimes a crow leaves a gift.
.
But crow gifts are not guaranteed. "I can't say they always will (give presents)," Marzluff admits, having never received any gifts personally, "but I have seen an awful lot of things crows have brought people."
.
Not all crows deliver shiny objects either. Sometimes they give the kind of presents "they would give to their mate", says Marzluff. "Courtship feeding, for example. So some people, their presents are dead baby birds that the crow brings in."
.
Gabi has been given some icky objects. Her mother threw out a rotting crab claw, for example.
.
Gabi points out a heavily rusted screw she prefers not to touch. It's labelled "Third Favorite." Asking her why an untouchable object is in the favourites, she answers, "You don't' see a crow carrying around a screw that much. Unless it's trying to build its house."
.
Lisa, Gabi's mom, regularly photographs the crows and charts their behaviour and interactions. Her most amazing gift came just a few weeks ago, when she lost a lens cap in a nearby alley while photographing a bald eagle as it circled over the neighbourhood.
.
She didn't even have to look for it. It was sitting on the edge of the birdbath.
.
Had the crows returned it? Lisa logged on to her computer and pulled up their bird-cam. There was the crow she suspected. "You can see it bringing it into the yard. Walks it to the birdbath and actually spends time rinsing this lens cap."
.
"I'm sure that it was intentional," she smiles. "They watch us all the time. I'm sure they knew I dropped it. I'm sure they decided they wanted to return it."
Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: Nadir on August 08, 2019, 09:23:29 PM
"Trouble follows you like crows...." ;) ;)

I have a general disdain for magpies. Far more irritating noiseboxes they are, no to mention another species that drives songbirds away. And molest people's cats.

If a pair decide try to nest next year in the backwards trees, they will be terminated with extreme pride and prejudice.
Our maggies attack people, that is when they have chicks in the nest. They'll swoop down on you so you need to ward them off. Our neighbour does that by feeding them. She says they will never attack you if you feed them.
Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: Matto on August 08, 2019, 09:28:07 PM
Two days ago while walking home from Kew Gardens, I witnessed a battle between sparrows and ugly pigeons. It was in a field enclosed by a fence. I saw the sparrows lined up in rows and the ugly pigeons were all in a jumble. It was like watching a football game. The sparrows were swift and ran circles around the pigeons and the pigeons had to retreat despite being so much larger than the sparrows. They all flew away except for one who was kept prisoner. I don't like ugly city pigeons. I like sparrows. I am only a child. I like going for walks and looking at the flowers and the birds and the butterflies and the bees and the ants. They are my friends.
Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: Meg on August 09, 2019, 05:07:47 AM
https://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-31604026 (https://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-31604026)

The girl who gets gifts from birds
.
Lots of people love the birds in their garden, but it's rare for that affection to be reciprocated. One young girl in Seattle is luckier than most. She feeds the crows in her garden - and they bring her gifts in return.
.
Eight-year-old Gabi Mann sets a bead storage container on the dining room table, and clicks the lid open. This is her most precious collection.
.
"You may take a few close looks," she says, "but don't touch." It's a warning she's most likely practised on her younger brother. She laughs after saying it though. She is happy for the audience.
.
Inside the box are rows of small objects in clear plastic bags. One label reads: "Black table by feeder. 2:30 p.m. 09 Nov 2014." Inside is a broken light bulb. Another bag contains small pieces of brown glass worn smooth by the sea. "Beer coloured glass," as Gabi describes it.
.
Each item is individually wrapped and categorised. Gabi pulls a black zip out of a labelled bag and holds it up. "We keep it in as good condition as we can," she says, before explaining this object is one of her favourites.
.
There's a miniature silver ball, a black button, a blue paper clip, a yellow bead, a faded black piece of foam, a blue Lego piece, and the list goes on. Many of them are scuffed and dirty. It is an odd assortment of objects for a little girl to treasure, but to Gabi these things are more valuable than gold.
.
She didn't gather this collection. Each item was a gift - given to her by crows.
.
She holds up a pearl coloured heart. It is her most-prized present. "It's showing me how much they love me."
.
Gabi's relationship with the neighbourhood crows began accidentally in 2011. She was four years old, and prone to dropping food. She'd get out of the car, and a chicken nugget would tumble off her lap. A crow would rush in to recover it. Soon, the crows were watching for her, hoping for another bite.
.
As she got older, she rewarded their attention, by sharing her packed lunch on the way to the bus stop. Her brother joined in. Soon, crows were lining up in the afternoon to greet Gabi's bus, hoping for another feeding session.
.
Gabi's mother Lisa didn't mind that crows consumed most of the school lunches she packed. "I like that they love the animals and are willing to share," she says, while admitting she never noticed crows until her daughter took an interest in them. "It was a kind of transformation. I never thought about birds."
.
In 2013, Gabi and Lisa started offering food as a daily ritual, rather than dropping scraps from time to time.
.
Each morning, they fill the backyard birdbath with fresh water and cover bird-feeder platforms with peanuts. Gabi throws handfuls of dog food into the grass. As they work, crows assemble on the telephone lines, calling loudly to them.
.
It was after they adopted this routine that the gifts started appearing.
.
The crows would clear the feeder of peanuts, and leave shiny trinkets on the empty tray; an earring, a hinge, a polished rock. There wasn't a pattern. Gifts showed up sporadically - anything shiny and small enough to fit in a crow's mouth.
.
One time it was a tiny piece of metal with the word "best" printed on it. "I don't know if they still have the part that says 'friend'," Gabi laughs, amused by the thought of a crow wearing a matching necklace.
.
When you see Gabi's collection, it's hard not to wish for gift-giving crows of your own.
.
"If you want to form a bond with a crow, be consistent in rewarding them," advises John Marzluff, professor of wildlife science at the University of Washington. He specialises in birds, particularly crows and ravens.
.
What food is best? "A few peanuts in the shell," he says. "It's a high-energy food… and it makes noise when you throw it on the ground, so they hear it and they quickly habituate to your routine."
.
Marzluff, and his colleague Mark Miller, did a study of crows and the people who feed them. They found that crows and people form a very personal relationship. "There's definitely a two-way communication going on there," Marzluff says. "They understand each other's signals."
.
The birds communicate by how they fly, how close they walk, and where they sit. The human learns their language and the crows learn their feeder's patterns and posture. They start to know and trust each other. Sometimes a crow leaves a gift.
.
But crow gifts are not guaranteed. "I can't say they always will (give presents)," Marzluff admits, having never received any gifts personally, "but I have seen an awful lot of things crows have brought people."
.
Not all crows deliver shiny objects either. Sometimes they give the kind of presents "they would give to their mate", says Marzluff. "Courtship feeding, for example. So some people, their presents are dead baby birds that the crow brings in."
.
Gabi has been given some icky objects. Her mother threw out a rotting crab claw, for example.
.
Gabi points out a heavily rusted screw she prefers not to touch. It's labelled "Third Favorite." Asking her why an untouchable object is in the favourites, she answers, "You don't' see a crow carrying around a screw that much. Unless it's trying to build its house."
.
Lisa, Gabi's mom, regularly photographs the crows and charts their behaviour and interactions. Her most amazing gift came just a few weeks ago, when she lost a lens cap in a nearby alley while photographing a bald eagle as it circled over the neighbourhood.
.
She didn't even have to look for it. It was sitting on the edge of the birdbath.
.
Had the crows returned it? Lisa logged on to her computer and pulled up their bird-cam. There was the crow she suspected. "You can see it bringing it into the yard. Walks it to the birdbath and actually spends time rinsing this lens cap."
.
"I'm sure that it was intentional," she smiles. "They watch us all the time. I'm sure they knew I dropped it. I'm sure they decided they wanted to return it."

Wow - that's a great story! I'll share it with my husband.

I also appreciate the responses from forlorn, Kazimierz, and Nadir.
Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: Meg on August 09, 2019, 05:15:14 AM
This is an old thought I had that makes sense to me now:

"Here is a strange thing I noticed about squirrels and the kinds of squirrels that live in different places. In most places that I have been to, the squirrels are the normal grey (or red) kind and they run around finding nuts and climbing trees like regular squirrels do. But then there is a different kind of squirrel that lives in the places where evil reigns. There is a neighborhood I know that is seeped in sin and in this neighborhood the squirrels are not grey (or red). It is as if the normal squirrels have been chased out by a horror of sin and have been replaced by ugly squirrels who are black and slothful and sit around on the ground and have much less energy than the normal squirrels as if they are sick and tired of the world. In places where grace abounds, there is another kind of squirrel I have noticed. These are wonderful squirrels and are snow-white in color and very beautiful. They are very fast and never stop moving. When they climb the trees and jump from branch to branch it is a marvel to look at them as it looks as if they are flying. The difference between these kinds of squirrels is like the difference between saints, and normal sinners, and the unrepentantly wicked. I wonder if God sends these different kinds of squirrels to be among different kinds of people as a reminder of the state of their souls. (My grandmother had these snow-white squirrels in her backyard. That is a hopeful sign)."

After I first thought of it years ago I thought I was mad.

The scenario you describe above might indeed be possible. It's an interesting idea to ponder. 

Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: Nadir on August 09, 2019, 06:12:10 AM
Yes, Pax' story was a good one which I enjoyed. I liked that Seraphina named and fed Claudette. She also fed that young man on the thread about the homeless man.  I liked that story and I read it to my huband and he enjoyed it too.

I ponder why so many people feel so un comfortable with or repulsed by spiders. Not that I would want one for a pet, but they are good around the house, especially if you live in the bush (wilderness) and there other more pestiferous creatures around.

I love the golden orb web weavers and like to watch them at work. Many spiders are harmless, and not aggressive.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=jtX2owKVEAw
Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: Matto on August 09, 2019, 08:23:06 AM
Thank you, Nadir. I subscribed to that Youtube channel for more animal videos.
Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: Kazimierz on August 09, 2019, 08:45:38 AM
Our maggies attack people, that is when they have chicks in the nest. They'll swoop down on you so you need to ward them off. Our neighbour does that by feeding them. She says they will never attack you if you feed them.
That is good to know. Nonetheless there are so many of them, they need to be culled.
Now ravens definitely have a fay quality to them. Their vocalizations are the most interesting amongst the corvids, at least methinks they be. :)
Then there was the time I was given a smooch by a beautiful young female........wolf.It was at a wildlife centre in British Columbia where you can walk with wolves out on trails. ;) :cowboy: The only good thing out of a generally miserable trip to the Rockies last year.
Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: cassini on August 09, 2019, 11:00:43 AM
Here in Ireland magpies, an invasive species from east asia, are multiplying at a frightening rate. They will kill young songbirds and steal their eggs. Songbirds are in decline because of magpies, while magpies increase. There is a poem:

One for sorrow, two for joy, Three for a girl and four for a boy. Five for silver, six for gold, Seven for a secret never told.

Today, one or two magpies are rarely seen. Recently, I counted thirty two magpies in the local park field. That poem could be stretched a bit today. Because of the damage they do to songbirds they now have cages in which they trap magpies. to attract them to the cages they use a magpie from another area. They know the difference and are caught attempting to attack these outsiders.

My best magpie story is the time I was on a holiday to Lisbon in Portugal. One of our trips was to Fatima, very interesting, but the other to an old hunting castle used by the kings and princes of old. One large room had 27 magpies beautifully painted on the roof. The guide explained that this particular hunt was attended by 27 guests who were accommodated in the castle. One morning a beautiful girl was see leaving the Prince's bedroom and the gossip started and spread like wildfire. As it happened the girl was a servant and had just delivered breakfast to the Prince. When the prince heard what the gossip was all about he cleared them all out of his castle. He then hired a painter to draw 27 chattering magpies on the roof of the dining hall and placed all their names along the wall.

Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: 1st Mansion Tenant on August 09, 2019, 01:37:34 PM
You must be from Aussie land.  Thank goodness we don't have such large spiders here in "the states".  I hate spiders.
Ditto. It gives me the heebiejeebies to imagine hearing a spider that was outdoors from inside!
Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: Matto on August 09, 2019, 01:50:03 PM
One for sorrow, two for joy, Three for a girl and four for a boy. Five for silver, six for gold, Seven for a secret never told.
Thank you Cassini. I put it in my book. I will try to learn it by heart.
Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: Syracuse on August 09, 2019, 01:56:37 PM
A long time ago I was deer hunting. I sat on a log in the forest, and a young squirrel came right up next to me within arms reach. He just looked at me and sat there for quite some time. He eventually calmly went away. Squirrels are neat.
Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: cassini on August 10, 2019, 10:27:29 AM
Thank you Cassini. I put it in my book. I will try to learn it by heart.

You get the full story here Matto:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One_for_Sorrow_(nursery_rhyme (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/One_for_Sorrow_(nursery_rhyme))

One for sorrow,
Two for joy,
Three for a girl,
Four for a boy,
Five for silver,
Six for gold,
Seven for a secret,
Never to be told.
Eight for a wish,
Nine for a kiss,
Ten for a bird,
You must not miss.

In keeping to the thread, two grey squirrels come intop my back garden nearly every day stealing the bread and porrage flakes I leave out for the robins and house sparrows. The introduced grey squirrels ran most of the red squirrels out of it in Ireland over the last few decades. The greys devoured the feeding of the Reds. But the pine marten is again increasing In Ireland and it can catch greys and eat them. The reds however can outrun pine martens and are increasing in numbers.
Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: Meg on August 10, 2019, 11:15:57 AM
Here in western Washington state, the gray squirrels have taken over where once the native squirrels were present, at least in the big cities. Our four native squirrels are: the western gray, Douglas,' red, and flying squirrels. According to an article I found, the invasive eastern gray was brought over in the early 1900's by easterners, who released them into parks and other areas. The eastern grays carry a squirrel pox that's deadly to native red squirrels. The eastern grays also eat nine times as much as the native squirrels.

Our native squirrels are protected by law, but the non-native eastern grays can be hunted. I've only seen the eastern gray in our neighborhood. They are a common site.

Article here:


https://www.tri-cityherald.com/living/home-garden/marianne-ophardt/article187456543.html
Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: Nadir on August 10, 2019, 07:44:56 PM

Ditto. It gives me the heebiejeebies to imagine hearing a spider that was outdoors from inside!
How about this?

Most spiders are harmless, and if you mind your business they mind theirs. And their business is to get rid of the really nasties, like cockroaches, ants, mossies https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=UNwPECUavj8
Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: 1st Mansion Tenant on August 20, 2019, 12:27:34 AM
Thanks Nadir, that just took care of all of my Christmas shopping early this year!
Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: Nadir on August 20, 2019, 04:24:52 AM
Thanks for the reminder, 1MT. I have to order one for my arachnaphobic daughter's birthday.
Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: 2Vermont on August 20, 2019, 06:25:20 AM
So, what do you all think of a red-tailed (I think) hawk sitting on your deck railing?  Who flew away 2 times only to return again.  Not high in a tree, but just outside your kitchen window sitting on your deck railing.
Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: Matto on August 20, 2019, 08:13:31 AM
So, what do you all think of a red-tailed (I think) hawk sitting on your deck railing?  Who flew away 2 times only to return again.  Not high in a tree, but just outside your kitchen window sitting on your deck railing.
I am not Tiresias, but I think it is a good sign. Hawks are like princes. Eagles are like Kings. At my local Parish, Holy Child Jesus which we are trying to convert fully to tradition, there are two hawks who come to visit us. A male and a female. They like to perch on the Holy Cross atop the steeple and watch over the neighborhood. My Father always watches them. So If I had to guess the meaning of the sign I would say that it is a sign that Christ the King is watching over you and protecting you.

Once as I was walking in the forest with my Father to go look at the place of my Brother Patrick's death (where my father would plant flowers), we saw on of the hawks with a squirrel in her talons. The hawk slowly walked away out of our eyesight. I saw her with my own eyes. What is the meaning of that sign? I hope it is a sign of my brother's salvation, but perhaps that would be superstitious, I believe it was a grey squirrel and not a white one.

My Father likes to tell a story about a peregrine falcon her in New York City. They had a falcon and a falconer who protects Bryant Park in Manhattan from pests like rats and such. The hawk would fly above and come swooping down to devour any vermin. But one day the hawk made a mistake and killed a little dog, crushing her in his talons. And because of that one mistake they got rid of the falcon. As Yeats wrote and I love to quote: "Turning and turning in the wideninng gyre / The falcon cannot hear the falconer;". I heard that Yeats was an occultist.

The third time is significant, because ON the third day Christ rose again. I hope we are all praying that you are able to get to Mass more often. Or that you are strong enough to subsist without the Eucharist by making spiritual Communions.
Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: 2Vermont on August 20, 2019, 12:52:53 PM
Thanks for your thoughts Matto.  This was very strange indeed.  As much as I don't want to look into it for further meaning, it is really hard not to do so.  This has never happened before.
Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: Clemens Maria on August 20, 2019, 07:20:59 PM
https://www.google.com/amp/s/healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2018/11/13/amp/how-rare-are-white-squirrels.aspx (https://www.google.com/amp/s/healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2018/11/13/amp/how-rare-are-white-squirrels.aspx)

Interesting that white squirrels are rare.  Seems to fit the analogy well if you believe that the number of those who are saved is small.
Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: Viva Cristo Rey on August 22, 2019, 07:37:28 AM
The Squirrel

Anonymous
Whisky, frisky,
Hippity hop;
Up he goes
To the tree top!

Whirly, twirly,
Round and round,
Down he scampers
To the ground.

Furly, curly
What a tail!
Tall as a feather
Broad as a sail!

Where's his supper?
In the shell,
Snappity, crackity,
Out it fell.
Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: Matto on August 22, 2019, 09:41:41 AM
Thanks for the song. I love poems and songs. I loved this one so much I wrote it in my book and will learn it by heart.
Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: Matto on September 12, 2019, 10:29:07 AM
As I was walking home from Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament I heard a lot of songbirds singing in a big tree. Then two squirrels ran into my view on the sidewalk and they started fighting. One black and one grey. Of course I was rooting for the grey squirrel. The grey squirrel won in a quick victory after a moment of acrobatics. Then the grey squirrel chased the black one away. And I shouted out to the black one "Go back to Kew Gardens" then I thought better of myself and said "I don't want you in Kew Gardens either". After the black one ran away another grey squirrel stood up proudly as if in salute. I thought it was a sign of victory. Then I went home.

I am getting fond of Eucharistic Adoration at the local parishes. I feel that God is there, and going does not show my support for the post Vatican II changes. It is just adoring Our Lord who I believe to be truly present. I do not think the Novus Ordo is always invalid anymore or that by visiting the Blessed Sacrament it is approving of the modernists who are trying to destroy the Church (as if that were possible); I am showing my devotion to the Lord Our God. It must be wonderful to live near a traditional chapel with Adoration and Benediction where everything is done in the traditional way.
Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: alaric on September 12, 2019, 04:47:42 PM
Oh no, did someone mention squirrels! 

https://youtu.be/rfh4Mhp-a6U (https://youtu.be/rfh4Mhp-a6U)

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Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: alaric on September 12, 2019, 05:01:12 PM
How about this?

Most spiders are harmless, and if you mind your business they mind theirs. And their business is to get rid of the really nasties, like cockroaches, ants, mossies https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=UNwPECUavj8
I got bit by a spider a couple of weeks ago in my bedroom, I didn't do a damn thing to it. Gave me a big welt on my shoulder.
Damn thing still itches.
I also been stung by bees for no reason and I'm allergic. I can be killed by one of these little winged devils if things don't go right.
I don't like bugs or insects or spiders or any other litter critter that comes in arm's reach of me and if it does, it's lights out for it. I'm not taking any chances. These creatures are not here to make our life any better IMO. But the do serve a purpose I suppose, but make no mistake, they can and will make your life miserable for no reason at all other than you exist in their world.
I'm not one of these people who believe's " Nature's our friend". Far from it actually. Nature is always on the attack against man, just think how long you would last living out there in the "open doors" with lovely nature with no shelter or protection. Just think of how many people die each year from bug bites, insect bites, snake bites and animal attacks. Nature is out there to eliminate you, not live in peace. Including spiders.
No, spiders are far from harmless and nature is not your friend, my friend.
Title: Re: On Squirrels
Post by: alaric on September 12, 2019, 05:15:38 PM
Two days ago while walking home from Kew Gardens, I witnessed a battle between sparrows and ugly pigeons. It was in a field enclosed by a fence. I saw the sparrows lined up in rows and the ugly pigeons were all in a jumble. It was like watching a football game. The sparrows were swift and ran circles around the pigeons and the pigeons had to retreat despite being so much larger than the sparrows. They all flew away except for one who was kept prisoner. I don't like ugly city pigeons. I like sparrows. I am only a child. I like going for walks and looking at the flowers and the birds and the butterflies and the bees and the ants. They are my friends.
You mention the pigeons and the squirrels, I think you make an interesting observation. I've had to deal with pigeons for years in the city with my work, they're really a disgusting creature, they beg and harass you for food constantly, complete nuisance  and crap all over the place, which is very toxic. I have no use pigeons, two-legged, feathered parasites in my opinion.
As for the squirrels, I worked in one the crappiest neighborhoods in the Bronx years ago, there was garbage and trash all over the streets and sidewalks amongst a bunch of condemned houses with noise, pollution and drugs everywhere. a real blight within the city. And one thing I noticed besides the occasional rat scurrying by were these big black squirrels, they were everywhere. I've never seen them before or since I left that dump. I always thought that was strange. You may be on to something.