Author Topic: How did you find out what youre good in life?  (Read 2073 times)

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Offline catherineofsiena

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How did you find out what youre good in life?
« Reply #15 on: July 13, 2012, 03:38:21 PM »
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  • Quote from: theology101
    Quote from: catherineofsiena

     
    The Four Temperaments

    http://www.fisheaters.com/quiz1.html   (the online test is here.  I am not endorsing FE).

    http://sedevacantist.com/misc/temperaments.html



    http://www.keirsey.com/    (similar to Myers Briggs but free)


     


    Cool, I found out I'm melancholic. Amazingly accurate too. I do think I am more artistic than scientific- I often spend more time thinking of religious things than scientific, despite my chosen career. Perhaps I should start writing or something.

    I should also note my favorite poem is Milton's Il Penseroso (The Melancholy Man).

    These pleasures, Melancholy, give
    And I with Thee will choose to live.


    It seems many of us who post online are melancholics.  Kind of interesting.
    For it is written: I will strike the shepherd, and the sheep of the flock shall be dispersed. Matthew 26:31

    Offline theology101

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    How did you find out what youre good in life?
    « Reply #16 on: July 13, 2012, 04:36:32 PM »
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  • Quote from: catherineofsiena
    Quote from: theology101
    Quote from: catherineofsiena

     
    The Four Temperaments

    http://www.fisheaters.com/quiz1.html   (the online test is here.  I am not endorsing FE).

    http://sedevacantist.com/misc/temperaments.html



    http://www.keirsey.com/    (similar to Myers Briggs but free)


     


    Cool, I found out I'm melancholic. Amazingly accurate too. I do think I am more artistic than scientific- I often spend more time thinking of religious things than scientific, despite my chosen career. Perhaps I should start writing or something.

    I should also note my favorite poem is Milton's Il Penseroso (The Melancholy Man).

    These pleasures, Melancholy, give
    And I with Thee will choose to live.


    It seems many of us who post online are melancholics.  Kind of interesting.


    I have found that reading and posting on forums is a way to occupy my mind, which is constantly going a million miles an hour. Don't know if that has anything to do with a melancholic temperament, but I do love to learn anything and everything.


    Offline Clint

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    How did you find out what youre good in life?
    « Reply #17 on: July 13, 2012, 05:05:03 PM »
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  • Quote from: catherineofsiena
    Start at the beginning.  Pick up a pen and paper.

    Make a list of what you do during an average day.  What do you enjoy and what do you dislike?

    What do you do for fun?  For stress relief?

    What subjects did you enjoy in high school?

    Do you like books?  If you have a home library look and see what types of books you have.  If you go to a library, bookstore or magazine stand what section do you visit?  What do you avoid? (What you don't like is as important as what you do like in your quest to find mission).

    What bookmarks do you have on your computer?  What kinds of things do you search for if you are wasting time online?

    Are you a physical person or an intellectual type?  Do you need a daily physical workout or daily mental stimulation?  

    Would you rather be outdoors or inside working in office?  Can you do repetitive work or do you require a changing environment?  Do you need structure or freedom?

    Are you an introvert or an extrovert?  Would you rather work alone or in a group?  Do crowds drain you or energize you?

    Would you rather be the boss or the employee?

    Do you like to travel?  Do you need a 9-5 work schedule or flexible days and hours?

    Do you do volunteer work?  Do you have hobbies?

    If you had to write your own obituary what would it say?  What do you want to be remembered for after you die?

    I strongly recommend career and personality testing.  There are a few good tests, some of which are free and online.  Myers-Briggs is excellent but online will cost you.  You can get the book and take the test inside the book.  My results were the same.  

    Your college will also offer career counseling.  If the testing is free you could take it, although I would be cautious about career counselors themselves.  They will pressure you to make a decision when you are really getting to know yourself.  The answers emerge afterward.

    Another thing, if you are called to marriage someday, make sure you have an idea of your mission first because in addition to spiritual concerns you want a wife who will support your mission (Eve created to be Adam's companion and helpmate).
     
    The Four Temperaments

    http://www.fisheaters.com/quiz1.html   (the online test is here.  I am not endorsing FE).

    http://sedevacantist.com/misc/temperaments.html



    http://www.keirsey.com/    (similar to Myers Briggs but free)


     


    An excellent foundation for starting on the right road.

    Let me add that an alternative to 4-6 years of college, is learning by jumping in and working in the profession you like, starting at the bottom. Any salary is better than having to pay for college. Don't worry about salary, more important is that the employment teaches you something every day.

    Offline MaterDominici

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    How did you find out what youre good in life?
    « Reply #18 on: July 13, 2012, 05:06:48 PM »
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  • Quote from: Traditional Guy 20
    No I never thought I'd be here where I am but you know I don't consider my job bad. In fact I get angry at those who show contempt for those who do manual labor. But it does show you that the whole 'follow your dreams' stuff usually doesn't happen. Usually you will become working-class.


    Referring to "manual labor" covers a very large variety of jobs, some of which are quite desireable.

    I know one young man who finished college 7 or 8 years ago and moved into a good entry-level engineering position, but he really didn't like the job as it was nearly 100% a desk job. Now, he works for a small business where he can employ his engineering knowledge but still be the one out in the field getting his hands dirty and implementing his solutions personally.
    "I think that Catholicism, that's as sane as people can get."  - Jordan Peterson

    Offline songbird

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    How did you find out what youre good in life?
    « Reply #19 on: July 13, 2012, 08:26:09 PM »
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  • Always keep it to prayer and ask St Joseph for guidance.  There is a book called "birth Dearth" that give ideas.  Medical will always have a need.  Computer skills are always needed. Take up skills that if you lose a job you can have skills to help take up another job.  Mechanics in diesel are needed.  The best school is in Indiana.  There will be many school buses delivering students to clinics and such. So there is a CDL and mechanics.  Electrical is especially needed with these new school buses.  That job can take you anywhere.  Vocational is ok, as long as you know that there are jobs waiting for you. But prayers are the best way to go.  My husband needed a job and we did the total consecration of De Monfort.  When we finished the 30 days my husband had a job.  He went from aircraft mechanic, Air Force to Pharmacy tech. trained on the job.  He held that job for 20 years.  I don't recommend the military at all!  So, keep it to prayer.


    Offline songbird

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    How did you find out what youre good in life?
    « Reply #20 on: July 13, 2012, 08:26:55 PM »
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  • Always keep it to prayer and ask St Joseph for guidance.  There is a book called "birth Dearth" that give ideas.  Medical will always have a need.  Computer skills are always needed. Take up skills that if you lose a job you can have skills to help take up another job.  Mechanics in diesel are needed.  The best school is in Indiana.  There will be many school buses delivering students to clinics and such. So there is a CDL and mechanics.  Electrical is especially needed with these new school buses.  That job can take you anywhere.  Vocational is ok, as long as you know that there are jobs waiting for you. But prayers are the best way to go.  My husband needed a job and we did the total consecration of De Monfort.  When we finished the 30 days my husband had a job.  He went from aircraft mechanic, Air Force to Pharmacy tech. trained on the job.  He held that job for 20 years.  I don't recommend the military at all!  So, keep it to prayer.

    Offline theology101

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    How did you find out what youre good in life?
    « Reply #21 on: July 13, 2012, 08:44:35 PM »
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  • Quote from: MaterDominici
    Quote from: Traditional Guy 20
    No I never thought I'd be here where I am but you know I don't consider my job bad. In fact I get angry at those who show contempt for those who do manual labor. But it does show you that the whole 'follow your dreams' stuff usually doesn't happen. Usually you will become working-class.


    Referring to "manual labor" covers a very large variety of jobs, some of which are quite desireable.

    I know one young man who finished college 7 or 8 years ago and moved into a good entry-level engineering position, but he really didn't like the job as it was nearly 100% a desk job. Now, he works for a small business where he can employ his engineering knowledge but still be the one out in the field getting his hands dirty and implementing his solutions personally.


    I was a landscaper for the first 15 years or so of my working life, and absolutely loved it. After learning to fix computers I was still basically just a higher paid manual laborer. A lot of the kids that I tutor at the uni tell me they hate or are embarrassed by having to work labor or fast food jobs while in school, and I always admonish them to NEVER be ashamed of working for a living, no matter what work. As the Proverb says, there are lots of people who would starve for being too lazy to lift a fork to their mouths.

    Offline Vladimir

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    How did you find out what youre good in life?
    « Reply #22 on: July 14, 2012, 05:45:21 PM »
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  • Also keep in mind that what you are good at doing and what you enjoy doing and what you actually do aren't necessarily the same.

    Daegus,

    I am in a very similar situation with you. I am also about to enter college, with only a vague impression of what I am going to do. Unlike you, I've passed up a chance to attend a very famous university in order to go to a no-name school in order to pursue my passion for music, a decision that I have already begun to regret.

    I guess there really isn't anything to do except keep spiritually healthy and float by like everyone else.










    Offline theology101

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    How did you find out what youre good in life?
    « Reply #23 on: July 14, 2012, 07:42:57 PM »
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  • Quote from: Vladimir
    Also keep in mind that what you are good at doing and what you enjoy doing and what you actually do aren't necessarily the same.

    Daegus,

    I am in a very similar situation with you. I am also about to enter college, with only a vague impression of what I am going to do. Unlike you, I've passed up a chance to attend a very famous university in order to go to a no-name school in order to pursue my passion for music, a decision that I have already begun to regret.

    I guess there really isn't anything to do except keep spiritually healthy and float by like everyone else.








    Im curious do you regret your decision because you are finding you do not enjoy studying music or you regret your choice of schools? I played trombone and cello in junior high and have played guitar for 20 years or so, but I hated studying music. I still cant read music I play by ear.

    Offline Vladimir

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    How did you find out what youre good in life?
    « Reply #24 on: July 14, 2012, 08:22:25 PM »
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  • Quote from: theology101
    Quote from: Vladimir
    Also keep in mind that what you are good at doing and what you enjoy doing and what you actually do aren't necessarily the same.

    Daegus,

    I am in a very similar situation with you. I am also about to enter college, with only a vague impression of what I am going to do. Unlike you, I've passed up a chance to attend a very famous university in order to go to a no-name school in order to pursue my passion for music, a decision that I have already begun to regret.

    I guess there really isn't anything to do except keep spiritually healthy and float by like everyone else.



    Im curious do you regret your decision because you are finding you do not enjoy studying music or you regret your choice of schools? I played trombone and cello in junior high and have played guitar for 20 years or so, but I hated studying music. I still cant read music I play by ear.


    Although I can't answer your question exactly, since I haven't actually started college yet, it is a combination of both.

    For one thing, I have no chance at a future in music. I play the piano and the organ. These days, if you want to have a chance in piano, you need to be in a conservatory or under a conservatory teacher before you are out of high school. You also need a lot of connections. The standards for levels of technical mastery is so high nowadays that there is no room for mediocrity or even an only averagely impressing command of the instrument. I have 4 Chopin etudes on my working repertoire, 4 more in the process of being learned, and a Liszt concert etude (the easier one, "Un Sospiro") about half way learned, and I firmly believe that I have absolutely no chance at ever becoming a professional pianist. There are teenagers playing Liszt Hungarian rhapsodies after taking lessons for several years less than I have (I've played about 10 years). My repertoire list looks like a Hanon or Czerny exercise to them - they could play that stuff just to warm up in the morning.

    My piano teacher, who recently received his music major, looked almost pained when he said that he regretted working towards a music major and now having to go back to school to get a nursing degree. He gave me some wise advice that is good for other young people thinking about music or other art degrees: What makes you a musician is that you practice every day, not that you have a degree in music. What makes you a doctor or (fill in the blank) is that you have a college degree. So music is not really a skill set - you need some other sort of skill to get by in society. - Now this, was advice coming from my teacher, who was pretty much a child prodigy - playing Chopin etudes from age eight and  who studied under an accomplished concert pianist that has performed the Rachmaninoff Third piano concerto internationally on at least seven occasions. Granted, my teacher is not a Catholic and therefore probably differs in his worldview from my perspective as a traditional Roman Catholic.

    So on that front, if I have no chance at a career in music, what is the point of a degree in music? Isn't it just a bit of self-indulgence that, oh by the way, comes with a hefty price for my parents to pay for me to nourish a futile dream for 4 more years?

    And if a music degree is pointless, then why on earth did I choose to go to an relatively obscure institution over a very famous one just so that I could study music? (The university that I chose to go to does have a better music department in my area, which is organ, not piano, but still - why?)








    Offline Traditional Guy 20

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    How did you find out what youre good in life?
    « Reply #25 on: July 14, 2012, 09:27:23 PM »
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  • Quote from: MaterDominici
    Referring to "manual labor" covers a very large variety of jobs, some of which are quite desireable.


    I put up freight and products in the store I work at.


    Offline theology101

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    How did you find out what youre good in life?
    « Reply #26 on: July 15, 2012, 02:15:33 AM »
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  • Quote from: Vladimir


    Although I can't answer your question exactly, since I haven't actually started college yet, it is a combination of both.

    For one thing, I have no chance at a future in music. I play the piano and the organ. These days, if you want to have a chance in piano, you need to be in a conservatory or under a conservatory teacher before you are out of high school. You also need a lot of connections. The standards for levels of technical mastery is so high nowadays that there is no room for mediocrity or even an only averagely impressing command of the instrument. I have 4 Chopin etudes on my working repertoire, 4 more in the process of being learned, and a Liszt concert etude (the easier one, "Un Sospiro") about half way learned, and I firmly believe that I have absolutely no chance at ever becoming a professional pianist. There are teenagers playing Liszt Hungarian rhapsodies after taking lessons for several years less than I have (I've played about 10 years). My repertoire list looks like a Hanon or Czerny exercise to them - they could play that stuff just to warm up in the morning.

    My piano teacher, who recently received his music major, looked almost pained when he said that he regretted working towards a music major and now having to go back to school to get a nursing degree. He gave me some wise advice that is good for other young people thinking about music or other art degrees: What makes you a musician is that you practice every day, not that you have a degree in music. What makes you a doctor or (fill in the blank) is that you have a college degree. So music is not really a skill set - you need some other sort of skill to get by in society. - Now this, was advice coming from my teacher, who was pretty much a child prodigy - playing Chopin etudes from age eight and  who studied under an accomplished concert pianist that has performed the Rachmaninoff Third piano concerto internationally on at least seven occasions. Granted, my teacher is not a Catholic and therefore probably differs in his worldview from my perspective as a traditional Roman Catholic.

    So on that front, if I have no chance at a career in music, what is the point of a degree in music? Isn't it just a bit of self-indulgence that, oh by the way, comes with a hefty price for my parents to pay for me to nourish a futile dream for 4 more years?

    And if a music degree is pointless, then why on earth did I choose to go to an relatively obscure institution over a very famous one just so that I could study music? (The university that I chose to go to does have a better music department in my area, which is organ, not piano, but still - why?)



    Well you could always teach. I hear you though i have a friend studying vocal performance (opera). I told her that means when she graduates she will either be a diva or a waitress. She agreed she would probably never actually sing professionally, so I guess shes just doing what she loves no matter what.


     

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