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Author Topic: Gabrielle Lefebvre In Memorium July 12th  (Read 617 times)

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Offline mcollier

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Gabrielle Lefebvre In Memorium July 12th
« on: July 10, 2018, 10:02:49 PM »
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  • I believe July 12th marks the date that +Abp. Lefebvre’s mother, Gabrielle died.

    I have heard that she was a stigmatist and that there was a cause for her canonization prior to her son’s valiant stand against the Conciliar Romans.

    Is this true? I could not find anything more backing this up, but she was obviously a very holy person (5 of 8 children entered religious orders).

    What is the tradition/custom when praying for or having a Mass said on behalf of someone we have a strong inclination is a saint, but who has not yet been formally canonized by the Church?

    For instance +Abp. Lefebvre. Should one say “pray for us” or “requiescat in pace”?

    Are Masses offered for the +Abp and/or his mother for the cause of their canonization or for the repose of their souls?

    Offline X

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    Re: Gabrielle Lefebvre In Memorium July 12th
    « Reply #1 on: July 10, 2018, 10:25:52 PM »
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  • http://www.angelusonline.org/index.php/index.php?section=articles&subsection=show_article&article_id=878

    "In December 1909, she finalized the vow of obedience to her spiritual director, Father Hure, in all that concerned the sanctification of her soul by a definite formula addressed in a letter to him. "In the Name of the Father, Son and the Holy Ghost. In the presence of God, my Creator, of Jesus, my adorable Spouse, of the Holy Ghost, my Light and my Strength, under the protection of Mary, Queen of my heart, of my Guardian Angel and of Saint Gabriel, with the blessing of the priest whom God has given me for my soul, quite freely and with good heart, I make a vow cf obedience, complete and entire to my director in all that concerns my sanctification, until it pleases him to relieve me of it; blessing and thanking, in advance, Jesus and Mary for all the good and merit which this vow will bring about."

    More and more she delivered herself to Jesus "not only to do His will but to anticipate His desires." Father Hure encouraged her in a letter, "... you should respond by sacrifices and generosities without number. But already what He has done for you is admirable; and how much we feel the pressing need to bless Him and to be blessed."

    By this vow of obedience she offered her liberty to God.

    Her devotion to the Passion, her union with the sufferings of her Redeemer, her attraction to the Wounds of the Crucified, were a preparation for an extraordinary favor—the Stigmata. There are, however, no witnesses to describe the peculiarities of this supernatural phenomena in the case of Madame Lefebvre, but the letters of Father Hure seem to suggest its existence. "Does not this 'inconvenient' Spouse multiply by design the occasions for sacrifice? ... with the insistence which one uses to ask a favor. You sigh after the Fifth Wound, destined to perfect in you the Sacred Effigy. Like St. Francis you want to be able to say 'I carry in my flesh the wounds of Jesus Christ!' Let us thank God together for that which you have done, and for that which has been given to me to do; it is a great grace for us both."

    Certain phrases remain obscure and the meanings can only be conjectured. If Madame Lefebvre received the spiritual favor of the Stigmata, she carefully hid it. Some of her children only suspected it.

    It was in the month of July 1909 that she may have felt the first impression of the Stigmata. At the remembrance of a meditation in the church at Bruges, she wrote, "Knoeke—picture of Bruges—p. of the n.". This can be completed to "point of the nail." She saw herself "as a sponge drinking in the Divine Blood."

    "When Jesus possesses a soul," she meditated in 1912, "He marks it too with the Cross; one cannot approach Him without also approaching the Cross ... There are certainly superior degrees to which my soul is too feeble still to aspire, which it might never be possible for it to aspire to, so small and incapable does it feel. Divine flower of suffering which only develops on earth, the well beloved flower of the Divine Gardener, have You not seduced me before I knew You. Is it not Your sight that has charmed me before showing me that which represents You? If it pleases You that I suffer, O my Jesus, I accept it if it is going to make me love You more ... Is it not to abandon oneself while alive into the hands of the Living God?" In reply to this her Spiritual Director said: "Have confidence in Him ... Your Spouse knows quite well what to do ... Has He not led you until now, formed you, espoused you with a really exquisite goodness?"


    Offline Neil Obstat

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    Re: Gabrielle Lefebvre In Memorium July 12th
    « Reply #2 on: July 11, 2018, 05:13:07 AM »
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  • What is the tradition/custom when praying for or having a Mass said on behalf of someone we have a strong inclination is a saint, but who has not yet been formally canonized by the Church?

    For instance +Abp. Lefebvre. Should one say “pray for us” or “requiescat in pace”?

    Are Masses offered for the +Abp and/or his mother for the cause of their canonization or for the repose of their souls?

    .
    The Church's history has many instances of the Faithful having been moved by zeal to recognize someone's sanctity.
    .
    Normally now, it is up to the Church to officially recognize and to canonize a saint, but see what we have happening, the so-called canonization of John Paul II and now, if that wasn't quite sufficient, this October we have the looming specter of the same nonsense but this time for the infamous Paul VI. Fr. Luigi Villa did his best to warn us but his best might not have been sufficient, somehow.
    .
    When St. Anthony of Padua died, the Catholics all over Italy raised their voices and came from far away to the place his body was kept. There was such a spontaneous eruption of demand for his sainthood that the Church recognized him as a saint only one year later. The Catholics of his home town, Lisbon, Portugal, still refer to him as Saint Anthony of Lisbon, after nearly 800 years (will be in 2031).
    .
    Nobody could convince the spiritual children of Padre Pio that he wasn't a saint. I know some who started praying TO him as soon as they heard he had died. They didn't wait for Rome to speak. 
    .
    And today, when they say Rome is speaking, it somehow doesn't sound like the voice of Rome we recognize. 
    So you have a number of things to consider here. 
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