Author Topic: Dangers of Modern Supermarkets  (Read 666 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline PinoyMonk

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 341
  • Reputation: +10/-0
Dangers of Modern Supermarkets
« on: July 12, 2007, 04:54:53 PM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • Hey all,

    I thought I'd NOT derail the soy thread but still continue the discussion, particularly my past involvement with the Jewel supermatket.

    Perhaps it is not a universal phenomenon, but my store was rather horrible.  Since someone mentioned the purchase of one of those fake butters, I'll start this thread off with some insights into the dairy department at my former place of employment.

    When shipments would come in, there would never be enough room in the dairy coolers for the deliveries, so the product would sit out in the back rooms for 20-30 minutes minimum (often quite longer, perhaps even several hours).

    As you know, the product cannot be taken out to the floor on the original wooden shipping pallets, so the dairy workers would "break down" the load onto carts.  These would be stored in the coolers and taken out one at a time (or so was the plan) to the floor to be stocked on the shelf.

    Just like the original pallets, these carts would often be left sitting in the back room for hours on end (while the employees wandered off to do who knows what).  These carts would have cheese, butters, yogurt, juices, etc.  You name it; they left it sitting in the HOT back room.

    Before the carts even made it out to the floor, product would often fall off of the carts and spill on the floor.  1-2 sheets of paper towel later, the mess would be smeared around on the floor, and then the carts would be run over the mess (ie. they'd drag the yogurt, cottage cheese, etc. all over the store).

    In the event that someone was motivated enough to actually stock the shelves, they would pull the cart out onto the floor and begin stocking.  In all likelihood (by this time), it'd be the right moment for a break, a run to the W.C., or just a chance to hide in the back coolers and read a magazine from the checkout lines.

    So, what does that mean?  It means that the cart (full of disgusting product) gets to sit on the floor for an additional 20-30 minutes while the employee is off doing something else.  In all likelihood, the employee will come back and ignore the cart on the floor.  He'll grab another from the back and start the whole process again.

    To give you an idea, I'd often see carts of yogurt sit on the floor for 3-4 hours minimum on a regular basis with nobody attending to them.  That is if the managers aren't yelling at us to put them away.  Sometimes, they'd be there for my entire shift 6-8 hours, and nobody would be doing anything with them.

    Well, thank you very reading the first installment of "Insights of a Former Jewel Employee."

    Until next time!

    Pinoy Monk
    "In this difficult time, to be victorious, we must be steadfast using all of our strength and capabilities like brave soldiers fully armed in the battlefield ... Whatever happens, behave in such a way that God will be glorified."

    -Saint Andrew Kim

    "

    Offline katoliko

    • Newbie
    • *
    • Posts: 59
    • Reputation: +11/-0
    • Gender: Female
    Dangers of Modern Supermarkets
    « Reply #1 on: July 12, 2007, 06:20:45 PM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • were you one of these workers??  i hope your past involvement in shelfing half rotten dairy products and being lazy has been confessed!


    Offline Trinity

    • Sr. Member
    • ****
    • Posts: 3233
    • Reputation: +183/-0
    • Gender: Female
    Dangers of Modern Supermarkets
    « Reply #2 on: July 12, 2007, 06:30:19 PM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • Of course he was.  That's why it reads like St Augustine's Confessions.  I am teasing you, Pinoy.  Let us face it, if we aren't being poisoned on purpose (homicide), we are being poisoned inadvertently (negligent homicide).  I told my husband about the soy last night and I think he hit new lows of despair.   :pop:
    +RIP
    Please pray for the repose of her soul.

    Offline Dawn

    • Sr. Member
    • ****
    • Posts: 2439
    • Reputation: +44/-0
    • Gender: Female
      • h
    Dangers of Modern Supermarkets
    « Reply #3 on: July 12, 2007, 08:52:49 PM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • I would bet the meat department stories are wonderful as well. My favorite is the highly seasoned meats now available, what are they hiding and who are they kidding, it is usually old meat. There are times when in the middle of the aisle, on Saturday, there is a cart of meat waiting to be shelved. Funny, I think someone is right there but due to the busy time stepped away for a second. Now my Jewel has those enclosed refrigerator or freezer shelves, but, not long ago half the food towards the front of the meat case, milk case would be sort of out in the open and warm so I would grab from behind. And, let us not forget the great fun of the mental defects called customers who think that it is fun to open products, screw the cap back a hectic mom does not notice till she is home unpacking. YUCCH.

    Offline PinoyMonk

    • Jr. Member
    • **
    • Posts: 341
    • Reputation: +10/-0
    Dangers of Modern Supermarkets
    « Reply #4 on: July 12, 2007, 10:16:39 PM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • Installment 2: The Meat Department

    Personally, I did not work for the meat department nor did I work in their immediate vicinity, but I will say what I know.

    Their loads came in on the same pallets as the regular "freezer" loads with the Jewel brand pizzas, ice cream treats, popsicles, etc.  Similarly to the dairy shipments, the meats (along with the frozen products) would often sit out on the floor for a minimum of 30ish minutes.

    There is one exception which applies to the above rule (which applies to all deliveries).  In the event that the director of the store appears in the back room and spots the load, it cannot be sorted out and sent to the freezers and coolers swiftly enough!

    Anyway, I cannot speak for the department on the whole, but I'll mention a few other anecdotes.  Quite often, I'd find steaks, fish, etc. that customers had tossed on shelves throughout the store, left in the ice cream freezers, etc., so I'd need to return the product to the meat department.  Most of the time, the fresh meats would need to be thrown out (after being damaged, of course).

    The older ladies in the department were quite kind to me and usually would throw out the damaged product (deep frozen steaks, for example).  The middle-aged blokes glared at me.  I don't really remember what they did with the product.  Left it sitting out for all I know...

    The last minor anecdote that I could remember is that the meat department had a processing room in the basement where they'd cut the steaks down to size and all of those sorts of things.  Although the two older blokes that worked down there were always quite condescending towards me and made sure that nobody went through their area, my managers had no problem pushing old tables, loads, etc. through their processing room if the normal corridor was blocked.  Perhaps this isn't a big deal, but I personally found it to be unsanitary to track all of that muck through a meat processing room.

    Until next time...

    Pinoy Monk
    "In this difficult time, to be victorious, we must be steadfast using all of our strength and capabilities like brave soldiers fully armed in the battlefield ... Whatever happens, behave in such a way that God will be glorified."

    -Saint Andrew Kim

    "


    Offline Dawn

    • Sr. Member
    • ****
    • Posts: 2439
    • Reputation: +44/-0
    • Gender: Female
      • h
    Dangers of Modern Supermarkets
    « Reply #5 on: July 13, 2007, 07:05:50 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • Sanitation. You are quite right. My mother, who is retiring today from her job, has been the team leader for the local hospital's nutrition services department for 26 years. She has been in food service her whole life and taken many courses on sanitation. She has a hard time eating at restaraunts or going to grocecy stores. In a store, down most every aisle she can list the things they are doing wrong. Drives me nuts, still she is correct.

    Offline Miss_Fluffy

    • Jr. Member
    • **
    • Posts: 233
    • Reputation: +20/-0
    • Gender: Female
    Dangers of Modern Supermarkets
    « Reply #6 on: July 13, 2007, 09:23:53 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • I do think there are good grocery stores out there that don't follow such unsanitary and unsafe practices.  Problem is, they are usually the more expensive ones in uptown kind of neighborhoods.

    There are health codes that need to be followed.  You may want to contact your city's health and human services if you know of a store that is in violation of basic sanitary precautions.

    Offline PinoyMonk

    • Jr. Member
    • **
    • Posts: 341
    • Reputation: +10/-0
    Dangers of Modern Supermarkets
    « Reply #7 on: July 13, 2007, 10:02:22 AM »
  • Thanks!0
  • No Thanks!0
  • Quote from: Miss_Fluffy
    I do think there are good grocery stores out there that don't follow such unsanitary and unsafe practices.  Problem is, they are usually the more expensive ones in uptown kind of neighborhoods.

    There are health codes that need to be followed.  You may want to contact your city's health and human services if you know of a store that is in violation of basic sanitary precautions.


    With the exception of a handful of the upscale (Western) markets that you mention, I suspect that the majority of the local shops are in violation of codes, to be quite honest with you.  In particular, the ethnic markets would be in major violation...

    I'll use this as an opportunity to start a mini-installment on health and general sanitation.

    As mentioned previously in the dairy thread, product would often fall onto the floor, be smeared around with paper towels, and then dragged throughout the store by the wheels of the carts.

    The back rooms (particularly the produce section) constantly had smudges on the floors, which I suspect to be old product that's been run into the floors.

    Also, we once had an inspector show up (unannounced, of course), and the store director tried to guide him around in order to minimise the damage.  Unfortunately, I happened to be walking around the same areas to get my tasks done.

    First off, we had a dairy load sitting in the back room (ie. not in the coolers) when this guy showed up.  It had been blocking the doors into the dairy coolers actually, and the inspector could barely get in to inspect.

    Later on, I was taking something down to pizza/icecream freezers, and I had the great honour of running into the director and inspector again.  Before I could slip back out, the director barked at me about how I was irresponsible for leaving such a mess...in the meat department's freezer (ie. not my department).

    While the inspector looked on, I had to acquire a broom and clean up the freezer.  There were empty wrappers on the floor along with plenty of dust (or some sort of dust-like particles) and random pieces of torn up cardboard.  Yummy.

    My last comment on this topic (for now) is that I had at least one coworker who would spit on the floors in the back room and on the elevators too.  It was pretty evident because you could see random blobs on the floors.  Disgusting.

    Until next time... *gag*

    Pinoy Monk
    "In this difficult time, to be victorious, we must be steadfast using all of our strength and capabilities like brave soldiers fully armed in the battlefield ... Whatever happens, behave in such a way that God will be glorified."

    -Saint Andrew Kim

    "


     

    Sitemap 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16