Author Topic: Birthday of a Catholic Hero  (Read 570 times)

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Offline PereJoseph

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Birthday of a Catholic Hero
« on: September 09, 2011, 07:07:00 PM »
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  • Today is the 426th birthday of a great man, one of the most pre-eminent geniuses in the history of Christendom, a fellow Poitevin who, in my opinion, had all the excellences of our race, and a hero in the chronicles of the Church and the Kingship of Christ.  Unfortunately, because of the lack of faith and appreciation on the part of the French, they were punished by Louis XIV being raised terribly by a grossly incompetent and foolish woman, Anne of Austria.  Thus, when Louis le Grand refused to consecrate himself to the Sacred Heart, all of the framework laid by this noble prince of the Church for the triumph of the rights of God, the peace of Christendom, the liberty of the Roman Pontiff, and the recovery of the Holy Land was squandered.  But just who is this great Poitevin Cardinal who was of one heart with and dreamed the same dreams -- of conquering Constantinople and of the universal progress of religion and morals -- as His Grey Eminence the saintly Père Joseph du Tremblay, who fostered his career and worked tirelessly by his side ?  He is perhaps the most calumniated man in the history of our religion, none other than His Red Eminence himself, Armand-Jean Cardinal du Plessis, duc de Richelieu.  Please, in your mercy, make him the birthday present of praying for the repose of his soul in case he is in Purgatory.
     

    Offline PereJoseph

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    Birthday of a Catholic Hero
    « Reply #1 on: September 10, 2011, 12:18:34 AM »
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  • Hilaire Belloc, in his book on Cardinal Richelieu, makes a very clumsy and unfair case against him, accusing him of many character flaws and bad intentions with either no evidence but his own rash suspicions or else a mountain of contrary evidence he didn't consult.  The typical argument, as so typically presented by Hilaire Belloc before being regurgitated by other anglophones, is that, for instance, it was a great crime to fund Gustavus Adolphus against the Habsburgs, since Gustavus Adolphus stopped the Habsburg war effort, which would most likely have entailed an increase in the Faith in the German regions the Habsburgs would have conquered.  But then he admits that Richelieu didn't envision Gustavus Adolphus going on a prodigious rampage across the German lands and was expecting him to distract and draw away Habsburg forces from other battles, being very alarmed when the Swedish King started destroying whole armies instead.  But then, after that crucual admission, he prevents it from influencing his conclusion and still assigns Richelieu with blame for the whole affair with the insinuation that everything accorded with his plan.  Ridiculous.  Alexandre Dumas also didn't do the Cardinal any favours.


    Offline s2srea

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    Birthday of a Catholic Hero
    « Reply #2 on: August 18, 2012, 11:03:13 PM »
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  • Do you think Mazarin, his successor, was successful in continuing the policies of Richelieu. Mazarin was an Italian, which I thought was interesting.

     

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