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Offline 1st Mansion Tenant

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Austria closing mosques and expelling Imams
« on: June 13, 2018, 12:03:41 PM »
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  • BERLIN –  Austria's government is closing seven mosques and plans to expel imams in a crackdown on "political Islam" and foreign financing of mosques.
    Chancellor Sebastian Kurz said Friday that the government is shutting a hardline Turkish nationalist mosque in Vienna and dissolving a group called the Arab Religious Community that runs six mosques.
    The actions by the government were based on a 2015 law that, among other things, prevents religious communities from getting funding from abroad. Interior Minister Herbert Kickl said the residence permits of around 40 imams employed by ATIB, which oversees Turkish mosques in Austria, are being reviewed.


    Kickl said that, in two cases, permits have already been revoked. Five more imams were denied first-time permits.
    The conservative Kurz governs in a coalition with the anti-migration Freedom Party.




    Offline Mega-fin

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    Re: Austria closing mosques and expelling Imams
    « Reply #1 on: June 13, 2018, 05:07:16 PM »
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  • Well maybe Austria wouldn’t be a half bad place to be!


    Offline songbird

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    Re: Austria closing mosques and expelling Imams
    « Reply #2 on: June 13, 2018, 05:11:51 PM »
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  • My family left Bavaria in 1847.  Never returned.

    Offline JPaul

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    Re: Austria closing mosques and expelling Imams
    « Reply #3 on: June 13, 2018, 07:40:42 PM »
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  • Good for them! Of course it will upset Francis no end, but he has more care for Mohametans than for Catholics.

    Offline JezusDeKoning

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    Re: Austria closing mosques and expelling Imams
    « Reply #4 on: June 14, 2018, 01:55:42 AM »
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  • Sebastian Kurz could hopefully be the Catholic leader Europe and Austria so richly deserve. This is amazing news. It doesn't go far enough, but it's a start.
    There is a God, but there probably is no Pope Francis.


    Offline Neil Obstat

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    Re: Austria closing mosques and expelling Imams
    « Reply #5 on: June 14, 2018, 04:01:37 PM »
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  • Good for them! Of course it will upset Francis no end, but he has more care for Mohametans than for Catholics.
    .
    Maybe Francis should bring the Mohammedans into the Vatican, then someone could use the floor space of the Papal suite since it's too fancy for His Humbleness. Just let them run rampant, they won't mind. They're good at taking over buildings. And cities. And countries.
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    Offline Neil Obstat

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    Re: Austria closing mosques and expelling Imams
    « Reply #6 on: June 14, 2018, 04:02:45 PM »
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  • My family left Bavaria in 1847.  Never returned.
    .
    Now's your chance to turn over a new leaf! 
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    Offline Neil Obstat

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    Re: Austria closing mosques and expelling Imams
    « Reply #7 on: June 14, 2018, 04:07:32 PM »
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  • BERLIN –  Austria's government is closing seven mosques and plans to expel imams in a crackdown on "political Islam" and foreign financing of mosques.
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    What does Berlin have to do with Austria? Berlin is in Germany. Vienna is the capital of Austria, 524 km away. 


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    Offline AlligatorDicax

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    Berlin allerdings!/Re: Austria closing mosques and expelling Imams
    « Reply #8 on: June 14, 2018, 11:00:15 PM »
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  • What does Berlin have to do with Austria?  Berlin is in GermanyVienna is the capital of Austria, 524 km away.

    Some readers of CathInfo might be indebted to you for your clarification.  Are you enjoying your pedantry-of-the-obvious?  You might've offered the Anschluß (1938) as a less-obvious answer to your opening question.

    For a news-agency nowadays, having a bureau in every European capital is a luxury that's now decades in the past.  Possibly as long past as the "news media" being called "the press".  Bureaus were eliminated when the agencies' news divisions were changed from principled public services into corporate profit centers that were required to generate income comparable to entertainment divisions (as in, e.g., t.v. and radio networks).  Thus the increase in frequent-flyer roving reporters, who might have little understanding of the countries--neither language nor culture--from which they were temporarily reporting.  But the role was probably perceived by the audience as glamorous, and the scheme satisfied the new corporate cost-cutting priorities.

    Berlin is an excellent location for a news agency's Central-Europe(an) bureau.  Especially back when there was a free West Berlin and a walled-in East Berlin.  Bureaucrats or other, um, contacts of varying shadiness in the latter were probably the most efficient path to obtaining whatever official papers were needed to report news from the occupied territories of the Former Soviet Union (e.g., Czechoslavakia, Poland, Yugoslavia).  Having served both West & East, Berlin might also offer the best assortment of airline destinations & departure-times.

    But thus far, this posting is just a response to your digression.

    To return to the real topic: Give 'em [Hades] Herr Kanzler Kurz!  Some European head-of-state's gotta do it!  And we know that Austria's neighbor Frau Merkel is a shamelessly overt traitor, not only to her own Germany, but also to all Europe!

    Offline Nadir

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    Re: Austria closing mosques and expelling Imams
    « Reply #9 on: June 15, 2018, 03:13:56 AM »
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  • My family left Bavaria in 1847.  Never returned.
    Bavaria is not in Austria either, but maybe it was in 1847.

    Offline Nadir

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    Re: Austria closing mosques and expelling Imams
    « Reply #10 on: June 15, 2018, 03:40:24 AM »
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  • Offline Nadir

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    Re: Austria closing mosques and expelling Imams
    « Reply #11 on: June 18, 2018, 05:04:49 PM »
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  • FINIAN CUNNINGHAM | 17.06.2018 | WORLD / EUROPEFEATURED STORY
    Italy Wins First Showdown over Migrants
    Only days after coming to power, Italy’s new populist government has won in an early showdown with the European Union establishment over the contentious issue of migration.
    This week, Italy refused to let a search-and-rescue ship dock in Sicily with over 600 refugees onboard. The stranded people mainly from Africa had been picked up in the coastal waters off Libya and were being transported to Italy.
    Italy’s interior minister Matteo Salvini pointedly refused to let the ship disembark. He said: “Saving lives at sea is a duty, but transforming Italy into an enormous refugee camp is not… Italy is done bowing its head and obeying. This time there’s someone saying no.”
    After a 24-hour period of uncertainty over the destiny of the wretched passengers – including pregnant women and children – the vessel was in the end agreed to be received by Spain at its port of Valencia. One may surmise that the European Union establishment in Brussels intervened hurriedly to avert a public relations disaster from a ship crowded with refugees being stranded on the high seas.
    In that way, Salvini, the leader of the League party – which is a coalition partner in the new Italian government – was fulfilling one of its main election promises: ending the flow of migrants into Italy.
    Since 2104, Italy has received some 600,000 refugees who have come to its shores from the Middle East and North Africa after making perilous journeys across the Mediterranean. Thousands have died from drowning while trying to make the crossing in overcrowded and leaky boats.
    When Salvini refused the docking of the vessel this week in Sicily, media reports initially portrayed the response as heartless and a transgression of international maritime law. His party is routinely described as being “far-right” and “anti-immigrant”. It seems those sinister epithets are used in the media as a way to undermine Salvini and the new government in Rome from holding their objections to the influx of refugees.
    But let’s look at the issue from a broader point of view as the Italian government seeks to do.
    Salvini and his coalition partner Luigi Di Maio, of the Five Star Movement (M5S), contend that Italy is bearing the burden of receiving unprecedented numbers of migrants, numbers that are way beyond what other EU countries are accepting.
    Geographically, Italy sits as a frontline state on the route for refugees from the Middle East and Africa. Under EU rules, the country which is the first point of arrival is obliged to accommodate the refugees. The Italian government argues that those rules are null and void given the unprecedented numbers, and given that the 28 EU member states should allocate a fairer distribution of refugees.
    Also, and this point is badly overlooked in media coverage, the vast majority of migrants are the result of wars and conflicts that have been sponsored by NATO powers, either directly or covertly, as well as by illegal human trafficking networks which have metastasized out those wars.
    The context is therefore not one of a simple humanitarian dislocation being met by a heartless “xenophobic” government. It is more a question of why one, or a few, European countries should be saddled with attending to such disproportionate human needs while other EU member states close their doors. Especially when those member states like Britain and France have taken such a prominent role in engaging in illegal US-led NATO wars that have led directly to the surge in refugees to Europe.
    In other words, it seems grossly unfair, not to say futile, that some countries like Italy are being obliged to cope with a refugee crisis on a national basis when that crisis has been engendered on an international basis through NATO wars in Central Asia, the Middle East and Africa.
    There is also a big unasked question about illegal human trafficking. We are dealing here with systematic collusion between human traffickers, governments and so-called humanitarian NGOs which are aiding and abetting the flow of migrants to European frontline states like Italy.
    This author personally learned of the plight of Ethiopian refugees who were being held in a Libyan state military camp in Sabha. The refugees ended up there after being passed on by trafficking gangs. The detainees were eventually released after families back in Ethiopia paid out ransoms – a few thousand dollars which is huge money for these people. The released migrants then end up being taken to Italy under the auspices of the UN.
    In the latest episode this week, the Aquarius search-and-rescue ship with over 600 refugees onboard is co-owned reportedly by a Franco-German civic group called SOS Méditerranée and Doctors Without Borders (Medecins Sans Frontieres, or MSF). The latter is funded by the shady multibillionaire financier George Soros who seems to have an agenda of promoting large migration flows into Europe. Several other so-called rescue NGOs operating in the Mediterranean are funded by Soros’ Open Society Foundations.
    Surely a question is: by what authority are self-appointed private groups picking up refugees off the coast of Libya and then transporting these wretched people to Italy?
    Surely an international response must be organized to stabilize countries racked by war and other deprivations by mobilizing massive debt-free financial investment; just as importantly, where NATO powers have been involved in waging wars and conflict as in Libya, Mali, Ivory Coast, Central African Republic, and covertly in Syria, those perpetrators must be prosecuted and compelled to pay reparations.
    Italy’s new government has right. Why should one country be forced to become a dumping ground for refugees from illegal wars and illegal human trafficking? In particular, when there is a collective responsibility of culprit states, like the US, Britain and France, which skulk off into the shadows.
    The showdown this week between Italy and the EU establishment was an important victory. Not a victory about spurning humanitarian need, but rather about overhauling the narrative of the refugee crisis to a more accurate perspective of what it is really about, who is really to blame and who should be really held to account?

     

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