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Author Topic: Aspergers syndrome and seminaries  (Read 2660 times)

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Offline tradlover

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Aspergers syndrome and seminaries
« on: April 08, 2011, 05:03:29 PM »
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  • Does having Asperger's Syndrome prevent someone from entering a Trad seminary  or is it considered an impediment? I was curious abou how Trad seminaries deal with  autism and their policies concerning people with them.

    Asperger's is an autistic spectrum disorder.

    Offline momofmany

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    Aspergers syndrome and seminaries
    « Reply #1 on: April 08, 2011, 06:42:09 PM »
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  • I think it would depend on the level of functioning of the individual. Personally, I don't think most Aspergians would make very good pastoral priests. I think they are more suited to a monastic life if they feel they have a vocation.
    That's just my take from having a son with AS.


    Offline Sigismund

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    Aspergers syndrome and seminaries
    « Reply #2 on: April 08, 2011, 10:02:55 PM »
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  • Asperger's covers a lot of ground.  I think the statemtn above thet they might have trouble as parish priests would often be true, but there could be exceptions.  The one priest I personally know who has Asperger's is a Benedictine monk and an academic.
    Stir up within Thy Church, we beseech Thee, O Lord, the Spirit with which blessed Josaphat, Thy Martyr and Bishop, was filled, when he laid down his life for his sheep: so that, through his intercession, we too may be moved and strengthen by the same Spir

    Offline Hobbledehoy

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    Aspergers syndrome and seminaries
    « Reply #3 on: April 08, 2011, 10:34:00 PM »
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  • It may be viewed as a cognitive deficiency, which (if severe and untreated, or treated badly) may constitute a sort of defectus animi, as specified in Can. 984, no. 3, in the Pio-Benedictine Code of Canon Law. It is my understanding that those who suffer from chronic depression or schizophrenia, for example, would be barred from Sacred Orders by reason of this prescription.

    As with most impediments either to the Priesthood or Religious life, the situations and factors thereof are as diverse and sundry as the individuals to whom the impediments are applicable. A Father Confessor and Spiritual Director should be consulted, and the counsel of the Rectors of the particular Seminary to which the individual wishes to apply must be sought. A physician or therapist should also be consulted, if it is applicable.

    The Priest has to bear the burden of all his flock, and each soul thereof individually, as a Father in distributing the Sacraments, teaching the doctrines of Holy Church and giving spiritual counsel, and as a Judge in the tribunal of Penance and in practical application of moral principles in individual cases. This necessitates a health of mind and body that is superlative, that a Priest may withstand physically and mentally the exhaustion and crosses proper to his state, especially in these times.
    Please ignore all that I have written regarding sedevacantism.

    Offline Jehanne

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    Aspergers syndrome and seminaries
    « Reply #4 on: April 09, 2011, 08:02:26 AM »
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  • How would anyone know?  If a seminarian simply chose not to reveal it, even under pain of mortal sin, then how would anyone know?  An unjust law is, of course, not a law at all.


     

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