Author Topic: Anyone else like Shakespeare?  (Read 2139 times)

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Offline Jacob III

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Anyone else like Shakespeare?
« on: February 25, 2013, 08:52:28 PM »
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  • What's your favorite play?

    I just finished reading Julius Cesar and found the play very interesting. It was composed during the reign of Elizabeth I and became popular because it dealt with the ever possible assassination of a controversial leader. I'll read Antony and Cleopatra next, because it is apparently a "sequel".
    Laudetur Iesus Christus!

    Offline Marlelar

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    Anyone else like Shakespeare?
    « Reply #1 on: February 25, 2013, 09:53:14 PM »
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  • I enjoy watching Shakespeare but not reading the plays.  I like the comedies best especially Taming of the Shrew.  

    Have you heard Dr. David Allen White's commentaries on Shakespeare?  The CDs are available from the SSPX seminary at:

    STAS Audio

    Marsha


    Offline Hobbledehoy

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    Anyone else like Shakespeare?
    « Reply #2 on: February 26, 2013, 01:09:01 AM »
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  • Quote from: Jacob III
    What's your favorite play?

    I just finished reading Julius Cesar and found the play very interesting. It was composed during the reign of Elizabeth I and became popular because it dealt with the ever possible assassination of a controversial leader. I'll read Antony and Cleopatra next, because it is apparently a "sequel".


    Richard II is the play of Shakespeare's that I most admire for so many reasons. Timon of Athens, however, is the play to which I can relate the most.
    Please ignore all that I have written regarding sedevacantism.

    Offline Potiphera

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    Anyone else like Shakespeare?
    « Reply #3 on: February 26, 2013, 02:35:10 AM »
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  • Yes, I'm very much into  Shakespeare.
    I've read all the plays bar 2 and seen all the perfomances at The Shakespeare Theatre.  I live close to it.

    It's interesting that Marlelar said she/he enjoys watching Shakespeare but not reading the plays.   I got into Shakespeare by first reading the plays and what I like to do before going to see a play is to read it first just to refresh my memory .
    My first introductions to reading Shakespeare was reading the History plays which absolutely fascinated me and still do.  I enjoy watching different perfomances although I prefer the  authentic costume and dress .  
    We attend a stunning performance Richard II , at the Globe Theatre in London in I think it was 2003, and at the end of the play they did an Elizabethan dance , accompanied by authentic musical instruments.  It was an unforgettable experience and the audience were  held spellbound.   That was the days when the Globe theatre was under the direction of Mark Rylance.  Now under new direction  it has changed I think for worst.
    Once and only once did I ever walk out of a modern performance.  



    Offline scolairebocht

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    Anyone else like Shakespeare?
    « Reply #4 on: February 26, 2013, 04:41:28 AM »
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  • I think Julius Caesar is my favourite play as well and don't forget that the current thinking is that there is a lot of hidden Catholicism in his plays. The Catholics will be called Romans a lot of the time. Anyway he is very good alright like so many of the other great Irish poets and playwrights ...


    Offline Marlelar

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    Anyone else like Shakespeare?
    « Reply #5 on: February 26, 2013, 09:20:27 AM »
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  • What is it about the tragedies that you all appreciate?  I find living in the modern world to be one "tragedy" after another so I watch Shakespeare for some "comic" relief.

    I know, I am WAY too shallow.   :jester:  

    Marsha

    Offline Jacob III

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    Anyone else like Shakespeare?
    « Reply #6 on: February 26, 2013, 07:38:43 PM »
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  • bump
    Laudetur Iesus Christus!

    Offline Jacob III

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    Anyone else like Shakespeare?
    « Reply #7 on: February 26, 2013, 07:42:00 PM »
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  • Quote from: Marlelar
    I enjoy watching Shakespeare but not reading the plays.  I like the comedies best especially Taming of the Shrew.  

    Have you heard Dr. David Allen White's commentaries on Shakespeare?  The CDs are available from the SSPX seminary at:

    STAS Audio

    Marsha


    Thanks Marsha, I wish I could afford these. Lots of good stuff there!
    Laudetur Iesus Christus!


    Offline Sigismund

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    Anyone else like Shakespeare?
    « Reply #8 on: February 26, 2013, 09:05:18 PM »
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  • Macbeth
    Hamlet
    Romeo and Juliet
    Henry V
    Othello
    The Merchant of Venice
    Titus Andronicus
    Julius Caesar

    Most people who like Shakespeare like these.  I really like Measure for Measure, which rarely makes people's list of favorites.  Also, I don't much like The Tempest, which often does.  

    Stir up within Thy Church, we beseech Thee, O Lord, the Spirit with which blessed Josaphat, Thy Martyr and Bishop, was filled, when he laid down his life for his sheep: so that, through his intercession, we too may be moved and strengthen by the same Spir

    Offline Kazimierz

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    Anyone else like Shakespeare?
    « Reply #9 on: February 26, 2013, 09:10:52 PM »
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  • The Tragedies, then the Histories, then the Comedies.

    Arkangel put out the complete Shakespeare on audio. Excellent production. Film and TV versions are hit and miss.

    (I must also admit to enjoying Christopher Plummer as the Shakespeare quoting Klingon in Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (Hamlet in Space!)

    Da pacem Domine in diebus nostris
    Qui non est alius
    Qui pugnet pro nobis
    Nisi  tu Deus noster

    Offline Sigismund

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    Anyone else like Shakespeare?
    « Reply #10 on: February 26, 2013, 09:34:56 PM »
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  • Quote from: Kazimierz
    The Tragedies, then the Histories, then the Comedies.

    Arkangel put out the complete Shakespeare on audio. Excellent production. Film and TV versions are hit and miss.

    (I must also admit to enjoying Christopher Plummer as the Shakespeare quoting Klingon in Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (Hamlet in Space!)



    "You have not experienced Shakespeare until you have heard in in the original Klingon,"   :smile:
    Stir up within Thy Church, we beseech Thee, O Lord, the Spirit with which blessed Josaphat, Thy Martyr and Bishop, was filled, when he laid down his life for his sheep: so that, through his intercession, we too may be moved and strengthen by the same Spir


    Offline Marlelar

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    Anyone else like Shakespeare?
    « Reply #11 on: February 26, 2013, 09:56:22 PM »
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  • Quote from: Kazimierz
    (Hamlet in Space!)


    Now there is a movie I'd go see !

    I think this is an idea whose time has come - all the Shakespeare plays set in outer space.  I usually don't like the plays done in "modern" dress but I'd make an exception for sci-fi productions  :dancing-banana:

    Marsha

    Offline Anthony Benedict

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    Anyone else like Shakespeare?
    « Reply #12 on: February 26, 2013, 11:16:56 PM »
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  • The late, great Joe Sobran had memorized ALL of Shakespeare by the end of his teens.

    My headmaster, a Piarist priest from Hungary who suffered torture from the Soviet and Hungarian secret police, had memorized an entire encyclopedia by the time he was 12 years old.

    Sobran entered eternal life of the opinion that Shakespeare was actually another man and not the William Shakespeare of history.

    Offline cassini

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    Anyone else like Shakespeare?
    « Reply #13 on: February 27, 2013, 07:15:24 AM »
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  • Quote from: scolairebocht
    I think Julius Caesar is my favourite play as well and don't forget that the current thinking is that there is a lot of hidden Catholicism in his plays. The Catholics will be called Romans a lot of the time. Anyway he is very good alright like so many of the other great Irish poets and playwrights ...


    SSPX distribute Shakespeare? Never knew that.
    I suppose they tell you Shakespeare he was a Catholic? More informed say he was Francis Bacon, anti-Catholic.
    Here is a bit I read lately:

    Shakespeare’s (Bacon’s) knowledge of Hermetic, neo-Platonic and cabbalistic teaching appears by way of certain Rosicrucian themes found in As You Like It; Love’s Labour Lost; Venus and Adonis; and the Sonnets.

    ‘In Bacon’s New Atlantis we have a vision of a science ruled by sages of Solomon’s House (Magi) and the Father of Solomon’s house rides in a chariot surmounted by a golden sun. It is possible that the character of Berowne in Shakespeare’s Love’s Labour’s Lost is based on Bruno [arch heretic] perhaps also the two pedants, Don Armado and Holofernes, who are the foils of the lovers. Some of the rituals connected with Freemasonry may be derived from the Hermetic writings, and Mozart’s Magic Flute, which is concerned with Freemasonry, has a temple of Osiris and Egyptian priests.’ ---J. Trusted: Physics and Metaphysics: Routledge, 1991,  p.40.  

    Shakespeare is also awash with Freemasonic propaganda, symbols, allegory, coded messages and innuendos. In the Comedy of Errors:

    ‘DUKE: One of these men is Genius to the other;
    And so of these: which is the natural man,
    And which is the spirit? Who deciphers them?’ (Act V, sc,I)

    The ‘genius’ is, of course, Bacon himself, and he teases the world by asking who is the natural son and who is the spiritual Son, profaning Jesus when He asked the Pharisees: “What do you think of the Christ? Whose son is He?” (Matt.22:42) wherein Jesus was trying to draw out of them a recognition of the that Spiritual Sonship by which He is introduced in the opening sentence of the New Testament, where in the Melchisedech sense of (Ps 109:4) He is termed a Son of David, in contra-distinction to David’s natural son and successor Solomon in whose name the rival ‘Allegorical Temple’ was/is being built, a distinction of such grave import that the very reality of the two Kinds of sonship forms the martial backdrop to the allegory key that the former Pharisee-Adept Saul would later as Paul give to the Galatians (4:24).

    Since it was first disclosed by Dodd and others that Francis Bacon was that wholly accomplished writer Shakespeare, many ‘experts’ have dismissed the notion as nonsense, and no doubt, will continue to do so. Such critiques may well succeed on the mundane level where it makes no difference who really wrote the Shakespearian works. On an esoteric level however, the level at which the [war of Genesis 3;15 is being fought] was/is being enacted, Dodd wrote with understanding and authority, that which is reflected only in the higher initiates. From our own studies we believe Shakespeare himself gives the game away when he acts totally out of character by his vicious attack on the integrity of (St) Joan of Arc in his play Henry VI, treating the English as having ‘God as our fortress’ and the French as being one with the ‘witches and the help of hell.’ (Pt.I, Act.II, Sc.1) [not very SSPX like] The likes of Bacon would be very well aware that Joan la Puchelle was used by God in this war of Principalities and Powers. Consequently, whereas he was a man able to engage and parry as equal with anyone from King to the most lowly wretch, all of whom are manifested in the writings of Shakespeare, he could not contain himself when making reference to a superior on the Melchisedech field of combat, Joan of Arc, now a saint, whom Diana Vaughan was pleased to invoke in her war against her former colleagues in Freemasonry

    ‘In the first part of Henry the Sixth Jeanne d’Arc addresses the Duke of Burgundy in a speech of thirty-three lines. This speech is an absolutely faithful version of a letter in France written by the Maid of Orleans to the then Duke of Burgundy and dated July 17th, 1429. There is no historical authority for this letter which never saw the light of print till discovered by the Historian of the house of Burgundy in 1780. Bacon in his travels might easily have seen this letter: in fact the author of this play must have done so. Shakespeare [Bill Shaksper] was never within miles of it.’ ---Walter Ellis’s The Shakespeare Myth

    Bacon’s Shakespeare and the ‘Holy Grail’

    ‘To be, or not to be, that is the question:’ --- Hamlet Act III, Sc. I.

    Thus goes the most quoted allegory in the history of literature, written of course by the Hermetic occult philosopher and proto-Mason Francis Bacon under his pseudonym of Shakespeare. Esoterically, it asks the simplest but most important question about God that can occur to man: To be (is He) distinct from the cosmos or not to be (or not) distinct from the cosmos? Is God a person or a principle; that is the question? Shakespeare, or rather Francis Bacon, is spelling out the battle on hand, the ‘Holy Grail’ of all secret societies, the secret behind [all attempts, especially pseudo-science] to destroy belief in God as distinct from the universe, replacing Him with a ‘god as force,’ with Pantheism, a god-concept not distinct from the universe and all that is in it.
         Perhaps the greatest exponents of these two mutually exclusive worldviews of the Melchisedech order, God as distinct and God as not distinct, are St Thomas Aquinas and Francis Bacon respectively. As God raises great intellectual saints to combat heresies in the world, so too must Lucifer recruit and illuminate men of exceptional but prideful intelligence to do his work for him. Now it matters not one iota to him whether his work is done by willing men or unwitting men, by men conscious of what they do or men deceived into doing what they do, the net result will be the same, the advancement of Naturalism at the expense of Catholicism. Satan, we repeat, Jesus told us, was a liar from the beginning, but men cannot perceive just how good a liar Satan is. Accordingly, the human intellect had better know how to retain a proper grace-assisted discernment as to how one’s intellectual asset is to be deployed and developed as the Creator intended, or one will surely find oneself entrenched in Satan’s lies. Now whereas the battle for human minds, and thus our eternal souls, began in the Garden of Eden, this quest accelerated during the Renaissance, or more specifically, with the resurgence of Hermetic Rosicrucian Freemasonry. To influence and control society, apart from a complete monopoly of the world’s monetary and commercial institutions, one must also dominate human knowledge on earth. The information industry must be commandeered and then regulated to serve their ends. Thus universities, academies, colleges, are seen as places of influence, as well as newspapers, television, publishing houses, the distribution business etc., are all targeted by Freemasonry.
         As to how successful the proto-mason Bacon has been, note it is the works of Shakespeare, not the Sacred Scripture that are on the curriculum of every student learning literature in the world today. Amid claims by Catholics that Shakespeare writings are most Catholic, we see that Shakespeare has become more popular than the Bible, and is certainly quoted more often these days. The works of Shakespeare have precluded any Catholic author or work from attaining such a status in English literature. If Freemasonry set out to dominate all the instruments of knowledge, this cannot be better demonstrated than through the genius of the words supposedly written by that uneducated illiterate groom from sixteenth century England. Scholars have shown us that Francis Bacon was also one of the first naturalists, rationalists, socialists, liberals, communists, call them whatever you like. This would pit him in opposition to hierarchy, the Melchisedech government in the Christian world. We mention this only to confirm Francis Bacon was the complete ‘secret antichrist,’ opposed to Christian philosophy, priests and kings.

    Offline Spork

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    Anyone else like Shakespeare?
    « Reply #14 on: February 27, 2013, 08:00:30 AM »
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  • I majored in English. There can be no doubt as to the mastery of the language and dissection of the degree to the human condition so employed by the author of such magnanimous works of pen. Yet we must proceed with caution as to "Shakespeare's" histories as they are ripe with areas of propaganda towards those whom we rightly must consider Catholic heroes, e.g. Richard III.

    Also, there is more convincing evidence that Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford, was the right writer of these microcosms of humanity. I have considered this even before that movie.




     

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